or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › True distance vs imaginary distance.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

True distance vs imaginary distance. - Page 6

post #91 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

Forced carries are the only way I know to tell how far you carry.
Same here. There's a sign at one of the courses I regularly play that says "240 yards to carry the hazard," and I carry the hazard, so that was one of the ways I learned.
post #92 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

Forced carries are the only way I know to tell how far you carry.
Same here. There's a sign at one of the courses I regularly play that says "240 yards to carry the hazard," and I carry the hazard, so that was one of the ways I learned.


I tried to look for ball marks on the fairway, but unless I am playing on a pristine or really soft fairways there is no way to tell.

 

The other thing is temperature variations can make almost a 10% difference. I play in the afternoon and the mornings. I typically can depend upon 7% to 10% longer distances in the afternoon (75F to 85F) versus morning (45F to 50F). The ball makes a 4% difference, air density maybe 2% and the rest is probably the way I react to cold?

 

So, when someone says they average 240, I would assume that includes various play conditions. So, in summer months they might average 252 and winter they might average 228.

post #93 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 


I tried to look for ball marks on the fairway, but unless I am playing on a pristine or really soft fairways there is no way to tell.

 

The other thing is temperature variations can make almost a 10% difference. I play in the afternoon and the mornings. I typically can depend upon 7% to 10% longer distances in the afternoon (75F to 85F) versus morning (45F to 50F). The ball makes a 4% difference, air density maybe 2% and the rest is probably the way I react to cold?

 

So, when someone says they average 240, I would assume that includes various play conditions. So, in summer months they might average 252 and winter they might average 228.

 

this is why I love Ohio in early spring. You get a good couple days of rain, plus the soft ground from snow melt, then you get perfect embedded ball situation. INSTANT CARRY DISTANCE!! 

post #94 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave2512 View Post

Is it just me or do people seem more concerned about how far they their drive than how accurate their approach yardage is. When I roll up to my ball I'm not thinking wow I really crushed that. I just want to be sure I grab the right club for the next shot. That's my only yardage concern.

This ^
post #95 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by PJCdude View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave2512 View Post

Is it just me or do people seem more concerned about how far they their drive than how accurate their approach yardage is. When I roll up to my ball I'm not thinking wow I really crushed that. I just want to be sure I grab the right club for the next shot. That's my only yardage concern.

This ^


I just started using my rangefinder so I am ranging everything in sight. :-D

 

Seriously, the only reason it comes into play is that my yardages vary so much from morning to afternoon due to a 20 to 30 degree F change in temperature. It's nice to know what to expect based upon the first drive. The other thing is I choose the tees I will play based upon yardages as well.

post #96 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

Forced carries are the only way I know to tell how far you carry.
Same here. There's a sign at one of the courses I regularly play that says "240 yards to carry the hazard," and I carry the hazard, so that was one of the ways I learned.

 

The 18th hole on my home course has a plaque that says "240 yards to carry left bunker", and it's dead on.  However, the bunker sits in the corner of a sharp dogleg on a mound that's 8 feet above the fairway and the same above the tee.  To me that means that I actually need about a 250 yard equivalent.  I've carried that bunker many times, but not in the last 3 years.  My length has dropped such that I just can't do it any more.  I can still carry the right bunker on the mound with a good strike, and that carry is about 15 yards shorter.

post #97 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 


I just started using my rangefinder so I am ranging everything in sight. :-D

 

Seriously, the only reason it comes into play is that my yardages vary so much from morning to afternoon due to a 20 to 30 degree F change in temperature. It's nice to know what to expect based upon the first drive. The other thing is I choose the tees I will play based upon yardages as well.

First you are likely to have an extra layer on in the AM especially with the temp swings as you describe.  It may not be the temp as much as you would think. 2nd Use a ladies ball in the morning or a srixon soft....plus they are cheap

post #98 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spitfisher View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 


I just started using my rangefinder so I am ranging everything in sight. :-D

 

Seriously, the only reason it comes into play is that my yardages vary so much from morning to afternoon due to a 20 to 30 degree F change in temperature. It's nice to know what to expect based upon the first drive. The other thing is I choose the tees I will play based upon yardages as well.

Use a ladies ball in the morning or a srixon soft....plus they are cheap


I was just thinking about that, but was not that confident it would really work. Thank you.

post #99 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 


I was just thinking about that, but was not that confident it would really work. Thank you.


But you are a "work in progress"......what wouldn't really work?  Its a golf ball and you are playing golf.

 

your words not mine.:surrender:

post #100 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spitfisher View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 


I was just thinking about that, but was not that confident it would really work. Thank you.


But you are a "work in progress"......what wouldn't really work?  Its a golf ball and you are playing golf.

 

your words not mine.:surrender:


True enough ;-), I have nothing to lose but a few bucks.

post #101 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post

The 18th hole on my home course has a plaque that says "240 yards to carry left bunker", and it's dead on.  However, the bunker sits in the corner of a sharp dogleg on a mound that's 8 feet above the fairway and the same above the tee.  To me that means that I actually need about a 250 yard equivalent.
You're right, the height difference requires a longer carry distance. One of the courses I play has a short par 4 at 285 yards or so. The first time I played there, my friend asks me if I'm gonna go for it. On a perfect drive I might have a chance, if only the green wasn't 12 feet above the tee box.

I have a rangefinder, so I've used that as a way to figure out my carry distance, as well. There are times when I've carried it into fairway bunkers and gotten measurements based on the distance to the bunkers.

I like the Google Earth and I plan to use it with my rounds to get a better grasp of my actual distance. I have an idea now, but I'll know with certainty by the end of the season. One of the things I've discovered already is how much distance I lose when I slice it as opposed to hitting it relatively straight.
post #102 of 132

Just something to be aware of when using Google Maps from a cellphone.

 

GPS accuracy can be up to several meters depending on your GPS signal and connection to local towers.

 

If you really want to do the job properly you need to use a hand held sat system which with the latest devices using either degrees, minutes and seconds or MGRS should give you close to five meters accuracy. Civilian applications that provide greater accuracy such as this used by Oil and Gas companies which are hugely accurate cost tens of thousands of dollars.. The alternative is to use a laser measuring system which are, depending upon how much you are prepared to spend, 'almost' spot on. Final thought for obtaining distances, take time with a club fitter who uses Trackman or something similar. They are pretty much on the mark as well.

 

Just my two penny worth.

post #103 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by utrinqueparatus View Post

Just something to be aware of when using Google Maps from a cellphone.


GPS accuracy can be up to several meters depending on your GPS signal and connection to local towers.


If you really want to do the job properly you need to use a hand held sat system which with the latest devices using either degrees, minutes and seconds or MGRS should give you close to five meters accuracy. Civilian applications that provide greater accuracy such as this used by Oil and Gas companies which are hugely accurate cost tens of thousands of dollars.. The alternative is to use a laser measuring system which are, depending upon how much you are prepared to spend, 'almost' spot on. Final thought for obtaining distances, take time with a club fitter who uses Trackman or something similar. They are pretty much on the mark as well.


Just my two penny worth.


 



Lately (when I get bored) I go to Google Maps and check the carry distance for hazards on courses I used to play.

Since I used to never see a shot I thought I couldn't hit I almost always tried anything and everything no matter how ridiculous it looked. Looking back on some of those ridiculous (and unsuccessful) attempts now that I know the distances is funny. It would have saved me a lot of golf balls if I had known.
post #104 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by utrinqueparatus View Post
 

Just something to be aware of when using Google Maps from a cellphone.

 

GPS accuracy can be up to several meters depending on your GPS signal and connection to local towers.

 

If you really want to do the job properly you need to use a hand held sat system which with the latest devices using either degrees, minutes and seconds or MGRS should give you close to five meters accuracy. Civilian applications that provide greater accuracy such as this used by Oil and Gas companies which are hugely accurate cost tens of thousands of dollars.. The alternative is to use a laser measuring system which are, depending upon how much you are prepared to spend, 'almost' spot on. Final thought for obtaining distances, take time with a club fitter who uses Trackman or something similar. They are pretty much on the mark as well.

 

Just my two penny worth.

 

And two pennies is about all it's worth.  While it is possible for them to be off 3-5 yards with a dedicated handheld unit, in actual use I've never seen that much error except on a buddy's SkyCaddie when the battery was low (that one was all over the charts, up to 30 yards or more).  Normally when I've verified by using 2 GPS units side by side, or by using a laser to check it (I used to carry both), they have typically been within 2 yards of each other every time.  That also holds true when I compare my GPS reading against Google Maps (on the computer).  My home course has professionally lasered fairway distance markers, and my Garmin is dead on with them. 

 

GPS reliability does go down in some settings.  If you are in a deep canyon, in among tall buildings as downtown in some big cities, in a very dense forest - these can have a varying effect on GPS reception, but I've only experienced any of these issues with the GPS in my car, and then only in some spots in downtown Denver when the signal gets bounced around by the buildings.  It's never been an issue driving up any of the canyons into the mountains.

 

However, these conditions are rarely found on a golf course, so it would be rare to have such issues when playing.  I've found my Garmin G5 to be both accurate and reliable 100% of the time.  

post #105 of 132

I agree with @Fourputt.  I downloaded the SkyDroid app, which costs $2, when I had to send my rangefinder in for service.  When I got it back, I used both at times and the SkyDroid app was within a yard of the laser read. 

post #106 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by MS256 View Post

 

Lately (when I get bored) I go to Google Maps and check the carry distance for hazards on courses I used to play.

Since I used to never see a shot I thought I couldn't hit I almost always tried anything and everything no matter how ridiculous it looked. Looking back on some of those ridiculous (and unsuccessful) attempts now that I know the distances is funny. It would have saved me a lot of golf balls if I had known.

My personal favorite of the most stupid shots I ever tried to hit (before I knew any better). Had no idea how far it was but it looked to me like I should be able to do it.:doh:

Only 382 yards. Exactly 0% chance.

post #107 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

 

GPS reliability does go down in some settings.  If you are in a deep canyon, in among tall buildings as downtown in some big cities, in a very dense forest - these can have a varying effect on GPS reception, but I've only experienced any of these issues with the GPS in my car, and then only in some spots in downtown Denver when the signal gets bounced around by the buildings.  It's never been an issue driving up any of the canyons into the mountains.

 

However, these conditions are rarely found on a golf course, so it would be rare to have such issues when playing.  I've found my Garmin G5 to be both accurate and reliable 100% of the time.

I've find myself in a very dense forest on the golf course every now and then....GPS doesn't help :-D

post #108 of 132
Quote:
Originally Posted by utrinqueparatus View Post

Just something to be aware of when using Google Maps from a cellphone.

GPS accuracy can be up to several meters depending on your GPS signal and connection to local towers.

If you really want to do the job properly you need to use a hand held sat system which with the latest devices using either degrees, minutes and seconds or MGRS should give you close to five meters accuracy. Civilian applications that provide greater accuracy such as this used by Oil and Gas companies which are hugely accurate cost tens of thousands of dollars.. The alternative is to use a laser measuring system which are, depending upon how much you are prepared to spend, 'almost' spot on. Final thought for obtaining distances, take time with a club fitter who uses Trackman or something similar. They are pretty much on the mark as well.

Just my two penny worth.

I covered this in an earlier post, and even included a link to the NAVSTAR specifications.

The improvements made by the commercial companies are using time delay of the phases of the first packets received from any satellite. The more satellites, the more accurate the time delay measurement, and the sub Navstar accuracy of the position.

I only carried my rangefinder to measure my club distance for a about a month, and my Galaxy 3S is surprisingly accurate. To verify both of them I took many landmark readings along each hole, and verified them with Google Earth.

The differential GPS systems are accurate to cm, which we verified many times while testing robots.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Golf Talk
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › True distance vs imaginary distance.