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Is overconfidence ever an issue? - Page 2

Poll Results: Can overconfidence be detrimental to your game?

 
  • 57% (11)
    Yes
  • 42% (8)
    No
19 Total Votes  
post #19 of 35
I voted no for me. If anything, sometimes I'll get underconfident when it comes to distance. If I'm working on my swing and either not making great contact or not making full swings, I'll start way over-clubbing to make sure I get enough distance.

"150? It's really an 8-iron, but they always say take more club and swing easy, so I'll hit 7."

Then I realize I'm not swing quite as poorly as I thought, and I'm chipping from off the back of the green.
post #20 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamo View Post

I voted no for me. If anything, sometimes I'll get underconfident when it comes to distance. If I'm working on my swing and either not making great contact or not making full swings, I'll start way over-clubbing to make sure I get enough distance.

"150? It's really an 8-iron, but they always say take more club and swing easy, so I'll hit 7."

Then I realize I'm not swing quite as poorly as I thought, and I'm chipping from off the back of the green.


Yeah, I have no confidence especially when there is OB behind the green. I think I would still pull the 8i out for 150 even if it means I come up a little short.

post #21 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamo View Post

I voted no for me. If anything, sometimes I'll get underconfident when it comes to distance. If I'm working on my swing and either not making great contact or not making full swings, I'll start way over-clubbing to make sure I get enough distance.

"150? It's really an 8-iron, but they always say take more club and swing easy, so I'll hit 7."

Then I realize I'm not swing quite as poorly as I thought, and I'm chipping from off the back of the green.

 

 

Doesn't that sum up the key to golf really, swing easy... the less you try to hit it, the further it goes. If you're hitting it poorly, don't try to hit it at all. 

 

@OP, you've mentioned a few scenarios, where after a good shot, you'll make a mess of the second. 

Personally I would call this a lack of concentration, but I can see why you call it overconfidence. 

But for me "overconfidence" is a more positive flaw to have as opposed to a lack of concentration, because I feel that if you are overconfident it at least means that you have focused on the shot.

I would associate overconfidence with attempting a shot that you really don't have the ability to carry out. 

But at least with this, you have some degree of focus on what is at hand. If I had a choice I would prefer to have too much confidence than too little. 

 

I used to mess up my second shot quite regularly after a good tee shot (and still do but to a lesser extent), this was because I would get carried away after hitting my good shot and my mind would race ahead. I'd have "hopes" as opposed to "expectations" (that's why I don't call it overconfidence) of a birdie or par attempt and I would fail to concentrate on the task at hand. 

 

Something that has helped me greater is the work of a mental coach called Karl Morris, he has worked with many Pros such as GMac. 

He has a free App on IOS https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/golf-mind-factor-karl-morris/id560458975?mt=8

I find it very good and try to listen to it every now and again as a refresher as I haven't fully embraced it yet. 

He talks about the importance of staying "In Neutral" during golf. 

post #22 of 35

Yes.

 

Confidence, with a solid recognition of your own abilities and limitations is a fine attribute in a golfer.  But, by definition, over-confidence indicates more confidence in your ability than you have skill and/or experience to back up.  That leads to trying hero shots you're unable to make with any degree of reliability, under-clubbing for the length/conditions, and generally poor decision making.  All of which is a recipe for a bad round of golf. 

 

Those that tell you, "Hey watch this.....I've got this shot!", seldom do.

post #23 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by hopefulhacker View Post
 

Doesn't that sum up the key to golf really, swing easy... the less you try to hit it, the further it goes. If you're hitting it poorly, don't try to hit it at all. 

 

 

I think the whole "swing easy" thing seems more like a way to get higher handicappers to swing within themselves. Good players like @jamo know that swinging 100% doesn't mean swinging as hard as physically possible, but instead means swinging as hard as possible while maintaining consistently solid contact. Plus, when you think you're swinging harder, chances are your clubhead speed is actually lower. 

 

To answer the OP's question, I can't think of a scenario where over-confidence has led to poor ball striking. However, over-confidence may tell you it's a good idea to fire at a pin tucked behind the bunker with water long and left. So yes, I think it can be an issue.

post #24 of 35

It's an issue to me in that it gives me unrealistic expectations of how I'm going to play, which leads to disappointment on course, which leads to frustration and even worse play. Having said that, the solution isn't to be less confident, it's to practise more.

post #25 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hopefulhacker View Post
 

 

 

Doesn't that sum up the key to golf really, swing easy... the less you try to hit it, the further it goes. If you're hitting it poorly, don't try to hit it at all. 

 

@OP, you've mentioned a few scenarios, where after a good shot, you'll make a mess of the second. 

Personally I would call this a lack of concentration, but I can see why you call it overconfidence. 

But for me "overconfidence" is a more positive flaw to have as opposed to a lack of concentration, because I feel that if you are overconfident it at least means that you have focused on the shot.

I would associate overconfidence with attempting a shot that you really don't have the ability to carry out. 

But at least with this, you have some degree of focus on what is at hand. If I had a choice I would prefer to have too much confidence than too little. 

 

I used to mess up my second shot quite regularly after a good tee shot (and still do but to a lesser extent), this was because I would get carried away after hitting my good shot and my mind would race ahead. I'd have "hopes" as opposed to "expectations" (that's why I don't call it overconfidence) of a birdie or par attempt and I would fail to concentrate on the task at hand. 

 

Something that has helped me greater is the work of a mental coach called Karl Morris, he has worked with many Pros such as GMac. 

He has a free App on IOS https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/golf-mind-factor-karl-morris/id560458975?mt=8

I find it very good and try to listen to it every now and again as a refresher as I haven't fully embraced it yet. 

He talks about the importance of staying "In Neutral" during golf. 

The bold is worded better than my post but yes, this is what happened to me a lot last year. It's almost like after a good shot or two I'd forgot that I still suck and that I still have to really concentrate. Lol. 

 

I haven't read any of Karl Morris' books, but I like the notion of "staying neutral". I am going to work a bit more on that this year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ctcampbell View Post
 

It's an issue to me in that it gives me unrealistic expectations of how I'm going to play, which leads to disappointment on course, which leads to frustration and even worse play. Having said that, the solution isn't to be less confident, it's to practise more.

Same with me. I have to remember that one or two good rounds doesn't mean that I have become drastically better overnight.

post #26 of 35
Yes and no for me. I have nevet been overconfident on the course but I have certainly had days where something felt right and those are always the days I play best and score best. If I feel bad, stressed or in general just out of sorts confidence suffers and so does everything else.
post #27 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonMA1 View Post
 

The bold is worded better than my post but yes, this is what happened to me a lot last year. It's almost like after a good shot or two I'd forgot that I still suck and that I still have to really concentrate. Lol. 

 

I haven't read any of Karl Morris' books, but I like the notion of "staying neutral". I am going to work a bit more on that this year.

Same with me. I have to remember that one or two good rounds doesn't mean that I have become drastically better overnight.

It is certainly something I notice when playing with better golfers! 

For sure, they have a better swing etc but they are also more "even" or "in neutral" when playing.

Maybe it's down to experience with them having played the game more as well. 

And I think this is true after both good and bad shots.

 

The low guys I play with they just accept when they hit a bad shot and are in trouble, whereas at the start, I would be cursing myself for hitting a bad shot as I walked up to it.

The good players tend to just accept it and focus on getting out of trouble. 

I was playing with a 5 HC'er last week where he shot level par. To be quite honest, it wasn't as impressive as I would have imagined, he hit plenty of poor/bad shots that would make you think...this guy isn't great. 

But the real difference is what he did after those bad shot... he always recovered well from it. 

Never follow a bad shot with another bad shot. 

 

I'm not sure if Karl Morris has published any books, that link was for an Audio App that someone had recommended to me. 

It's only about 30mins if I recall....actually, I think I might have another listen to it now with all this talk. 

post #28 of 35

Over-confidence to me is almost an outward expression that is manifested physically because the player either can't control their emotions, or they are trying to bring themselves to a state of confidence by acting it out.  I think it can be risky for many golfers.  Inner-confidence to me is what we should strive for.  The days(they are few for me) when you have it, the course becomes easy.  It can be seen by others as meekness, but it is a true inner sense of knowing the result before it happens and the only thing left is to act the result out.  Because you have not shown it to other players physically/vocally I think it becomes easier to deal with when you don't get the result you expected as well.  It only makes you more determined to make that up and down or to make the next shot count.


Edited by cipher - 1/15/14 at 8:22am
post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by cipher View Post
 

Over-confidence to me is almost an outward expression that is manifested physically because the player either can't control their emotions, or they are trying to bring themselves to a state of confidence by acting it out.  I think it can be risky for many golfers.  Inner-confidence to me is what we should strive for.  The days(they are few for me) when you have it, the course becomes easy.  It can be seen by others as meekness, but it is a true inner sense of knowing the result before it happens and the only thing left is to act the result out.  Because you have not shown it to other players physically I think it becomes easier to deal with when you don't get the result you expected as well.  It only makes you more determined to make that up and down or to make the next shot count. 

 

 

 

Couldn't agree more. Its being comfortable with your own game, and knowing when to push it. 

 

Like if you have a shot that you know you can hit 80% of the time, and it gives you good results go for it. If you have a 50/50 shot, now its time to do some soul searching, and really think hard about what you can or can not do and if this is a time to take that risk. This is were I think over-confidence can rear its ugly head. Not in the easy shots, but in the difficult ones. Or when amateurs make that stupid mistake, trying to fit a ball in a small window, and then they wonder why they hit that tree, or you hear them mutter,  "STUPID STUPID STUPID"

post #30 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cipher View Post
 

Over-confidence to me is almost an outward expression that is manifested physically because the player either can't control their emotions, or they are trying to bring themselves to a state of confidence by acting it out.  I think it can be risky for many golfers.  Inner-confidence to me is what we should strive for.  The days(they are few for me) when you have it, the course becomes easy.  It can be seen by others as meekness, but it is a true inner sense of knowing the result before it happens and the only thing left is to act the result out.  Because you have not shown it to other players physically I think it becomes easier to deal with when you don't get the result you expected as well.  It only makes you more determined to make that up and down or to make the next shot count. 

 

 

 

Couldn't agree more. Its being comfortable with your own game, and knowing when to push it. 

 

Like if you have a shot that you know you can hit 80% of the time, and it gives you good results go for it. If you have a 50/50 shot, now its time to do some soul searching, and really think hard about what you can or can not do and if this is a time to take that risk. This is were I think over-confidence can rear its ugly head. Not in the easy shots, but in the difficult ones. Or when amateurs make that stupid mistake, trying to fit a ball in a small window, and then they wonder why they hit that tree, or you hear them mutter,  "STUPID STUPID STUPID"

 

We're all amateurs (except Erik, Mike, Phil, etc.), I think you mean a novice player. I can make pretty small windows, now, as compared to a year ago when I was a novice. :-) 

post #31 of 35
Thread Starter 

With poor mechanics, an inability to concentrate and a lack of experience, I may very well be the worst player on this forum and definitely not the sharpest tool in the shed. But faced with a choice between a lay up and a risky shot, when that little voice inside my head tells me "this is a bad idea", I think I do a pretty good job of listening. It may be one of the few things a poorer player can control. 

 

Does that change when one becomes a better player and the risky shots become less so?

post #32 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonMA1 View Post
 

With poor mechanics, an inability to concentrate and a lack of experience, I may very well be the worst player on this forum and definitely not the sharpest tool in the shed. But faced with a choice between a lay up and a risky shot, when that little voice inside my head tells me "this is a bad idea", I think I do a pretty good job of listening. It may be one of the few things a poorer player can control. 

 

Does that change when one becomes a better player and the risky shots become less so?


What I have found is that shots that were "risky" a year ago, are no longer risky. I think it's all about knowing your limitations and not being over-confident.

post #33 of 35

Overconfidence can be a problem, especially if you think that you can pull off hero shots all the time.  I'll admit that Im guilty of seeing a small gap in the trees and thinking I can fit my shot through it.  Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesnt.

post #34 of 35

Confidence instead of competence leads to nothing good. 

post #35 of 35

Being confident and being risky are different things.

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