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post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hey everyone, just need some oppinions. The closest range to me is "Albert Park" in Melbourne and after reading some review's all of the teachers and pros seem pretty good and everyone seems really keen on them. But they are pretty expensive and I can really only afford the 30min classes. Just wondering if anyone think's you can benefit from 30mins or is it a waste of time and just some quick money for the instructor? 

post #2 of 17

I think there is a great thread if you do a quick search on how to pick an instructor, I guess my best advice is to make sure that your teacher uses technology during the lesson.  Ya, if you can't swing the club at all that is a different story, but in your case I'm thinking you should look for someone with video analysis.  This way, he can pin point what you need to work on and you can manage your improvement.  I can't speak about the 30 minutes or not, but it sounds to me like plenty of time for a good teacher to go through one lesson.  

post #3 of 17

You may want to check out Evolvr. I have not used it, but many on the site have and love it.

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mackingchicken View Post
 

Hey everyone, just need some oppinions. The closest range to me is "Albert Park" in Melbourne and after reading some review's all of the teachers and pros seem pretty good and everyone seems really keen on them. But they are pretty expensive and I can really only afford the 30min classes. Just wondering if anyone think's you can benefit from 30mins or is it a waste of time and just some quick money for the instructor? 

30 minutes should be plenty if the instructor is really good. The first lesson may be more about the instructor understanding your swing and flaws but after that it should be pretty effective IF the instructor is good.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by geauxforbroke View Post
 

You may want to check out Evolvr. I have not used it, but many on the site have and love it.

Evolvr lessons typically run 7-12 minutes and are highly effective because they target a very specific piece (priority) for you to work on. As long as you are capable of practicing in a disciplined and efficient manner you will see improvement. 

post #5 of 17

I would also recommend Evolvr.  I am on it and get better every lesson.  I don't think you can possibly go wrong with Evolvr. 

post #6 of 17

Evolvr prices are less than many other online lessons, with up to 4 submissions a month.

post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 

evolvr does seem like a great way but I think personally I would benefit more from hands on coaching. Just wondering if the 30mins is a decent amount of time

post #8 of 17
Yes it should be, it is almost standard lesson time anyway..
post #9 of 17

The best technology is ball flight.  If you know how the tool (golf club face) works the ball flight will tell you immediately what you did. 

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mackingchicken View Post
 

evolvr does seem like a great way but I think personally I would benefit more from hands on coaching. Just wondering if the 30mins is a decent amount of time

 

The things you need to consider are:

 

  1. The quality of instruction (are you working on the right things)
  2. After the lesson how are you going to get feedback? (When practicing are you practicing what you are suppose to?  Do you have a camera to check yourself?  Maybe a friend?  Or maybe you will need to go back to the instructor to check on your progress.)

 

 

So to answer your question, it could be beneficial with the other pieces in place.  I personally don't do 30 minute lessons with my students though.

post #11 of 17

You should only work on one or two things at a time, so 30 min. should more than enough time to find something for you to work on.

post #12 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by cortsongolf View Post

The best technology is ball flight.  If you know how the tool (golf club face) works the ball flight will tell you immediately what you did. 

Ball flight is just one part of the story. You can hit a draw, think you hit inside out but actually path out to in and hit towards the toe to get the draw. If you're looking at flight you can't always assume you hit it on the sweetspot.
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevets88 View Post


Ball flight is just one part of the story. You can hit a draw, think you hit inside out but actually path out to in and hit towards the toe to get the draw. If you're looking at flight you can't always assume you hit it on the sweetspot.

 

Trackman, Flightscope, etc is the best way to see your path and face at impact.

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by EverythingGolf View Post

 

Trackman, Flightscope, etc is the best way to see your path and face at impact.

 

Technically Trackman and Flightscope can't see the face, so if you toe it they'll report it as more "open" than it was.

post #15 of 17

I agree with that, but you are more than like to not hit it off the toe every shot. So it can be more accurate than just ball flight.

post #16 of 17

Personally I find that the 50 minutes lessons I have go really quickly, I don't think 30 mins would be enough for me to listen to what my instructor tells me and have a decent amount of practise shots with him watching to make sure I get the movements correct.

 

Why not just go half as often?

post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 

Well I decided to take the plunge and I booked a lesson yesterday. We chatted and said first lesson we should do an hour to film swing and work out fully what is going on, then after that half hours whenever I book to work on whatever I need at the time. 

He sounded really nice and has nothing but good reviews after doing some research. Hopefully he creates some improvement in my game 

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