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Getting Fit for Golf

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, new to the forum but wanted to ask around about a golf specific work out program. I have a myTPI account and after looking through their exercises and drills I am a little overwhelmed. I have searched the internet as well and still have not really found anything to my liking. Any suggestions? What workouts do you guys use? Any help is greatly appreciated!!

 

 

post #2 of 16
Hi Paz, I'm sure there are a lot of different workout programs, many of which are better than mine, so I'll just respond to what I'm doing and get a reply going. I'm in my early 60's so I decided that it was time to get in the best golf shape I could this winter before my league starts again in late April. So anyway, I joined the local "Y" and hired a personal trainer for 5 consecutive sessions, 5 Saturdays apart. I told her I wanted to specifically work on my body for my golf game. She has been doing this for over 20 years, so she knew where to head with me and what I would need. Tomorrow will be my last session, then I am on my own with the program we have built up and documented together. So the gist of my response is really not to list my program out, that would take too long. What I am saying is, that for me, getting into an organized facility, with a professional trainer, and clarifying my needs, one on one, was the best thing I could have ever done. At 62, I already feel like I am in the best shape I have ever been in, in preparation for an upcoming golf season. And, I have several months until my league starts to continue now, and faithfully stick with it. I learned how to exercise, what muscles are used in golf, how to have and follow a workout program for the first time in my life, and how to set and accomplish goals for myself. I couldn't have done this at home, nor with the advise of let's say 'nonprofessional' trainers or workout advisors who may have good advice, but who don't give you the exact information you are asking for when you say "a golf specific work out program" I hope this helps some. :)
post #3 of 16

I started golfing a little over 2 years ago. I have invented dozens of drills with a bowflex and golf clubs. I've discarded drills that didn't work and kept the ones that do. I have a drill for the backswing, weight shift, pivot and follow through all with cables on a bowflex. I have a mat and a net in my back yard where I'll swing for 50 repetitions and then hit 3 balls to test impact position. Lately what I do every day unless I am golfing. I golf Thursday mornings and twice on Sundays at dawn, eat, then play another 18 walking only. The other 5 days I do 100 swings with an orange whip then jog 2 miles. That is my current routine and I am really hitting the ball well lately. I also practice putting on an 8 foot putting strip. I have another putting drill I do that uses a 2 ft. x 4 ft board with a 2.5 diameter hole at one end, I covered the board with felt and tilt it up 3 degrees and practice arcing the ball into the hole from 6in, 12 in, and 18in away. That drill really helped with 2 foot yips. Anyway sorry for the long winded response but that is my current routine. I started as a 105 golfer and am currently in the low to mid 90's. I have shot in the 80's a few times with a pr of 83. My goal is to be a consistent low to mid 80's golfer. I am 54 and completely obsessed with the game.

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazimmer610 View Post
 

Hey guys, new to the forum but wanted to ask around about a golf specific work out program. I have a myTPI account and after looking through their exercises and drills I am a little overwhelmed. I have searched the internet as well and still have not really found anything to my liking. Any suggestions? What workouts do you guys use? Any help is greatly appreciated!!

 

 

Honestly I would suggest P90x or Insanity work out. They are not crazy Olympic style lifting, and they are designed for newbies as well. You'll probably feel like you are dying after you work out, but your body will adapt. The worst thing you can do is go out and try do something like a deadlift with to much weight and wrench your back out. Also those programs are a full body work out, which is important. 

post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

 

Honestly I would suggest P90x or Insanity work out.

 

I like this, these are good general fitness type philosophies.  Though intense enough to be hard to maintain.

 

As for the OP - Golf doesn't really require one to be fit at all - seriously, look around the course, and even on the tours.  But being overall fit can help performance in anything you do.  Fitness and nutrition is just plain great goals for 'life' (and I think it makes activities more fun, including golf)

post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post
 

 

I like this, these are good general fitness type philosophies.  Though intense enough to be hard to maintain.

 

As for the OP - Golf doesn't really require one to be fit at all - seriously, look around the course, and even on the tours.  But being overall fit can help performance in anything you do.  Fitness and nutrition is just plain great goals for 'life' (and I think it makes activities more fun, including golf)


The programs mentioned may help but I have seen countless people also injured form doing them.  They have kept many a therapist in business, I assure you.   Quantity is a far cry from quality. 

 

Golf may not require "fitness" in the traditional physiological/cardio sense.  However, the joint range and stability demands are far greater than many "sports" like running, cycling, rowing, and even swimming. 

post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

 

 

Honestly I would suggest P90x or Insanity work out. They are not crazy Olympic style lifting, and they are designed for newbies as well. You'll probably feel like you are dying after you work out, but your body will adapt. The worst thing you can do is go out and try do something like a deadlift with to much weight and wrench your back out. Also those programs are a full body work out, which is important. 

 

+1 for this.  I'm a fan of pretty much any full-body workout with no or minimal weight lifting.  Love body weight resistance and flexibility stuff from pull-ups, push-ups, dips, to yoga or plyometrics (all of which are included in the P90x program).

 

Also, in the past 6 months or so I've gotten really into swimming.  Good full body workout (especially if you get fins and do some laps with fins, with or without a kickboard), good cardio workout too, and it emphasizes full range of motion back and shoulders strength and stability, and the core, which are important for golf.  You can mail it in and just sort of cruise, but if you go after it it can be a really good high-reps strength workout too.

post #8 of 16
I played baseball in college my first time around, and picked up golf once baseball injuries ended my career... The cool thing about baseball and golf is that they both demand applying strength throughout a wide range of motion; the key is the balance of strength and flexibility. Say, as opposed to football, there is more demand for explosive strength and linear/lateral speed. (a running back is so musclebound that he can't really swing a club with a decent range of motion).

A really good book that you could buy on amazon for 5$ is called Core Performance by Mark Verstegen. It uses the idea that athletic strength should be founded on the core rectangle which is the torso and it's four corners (two hip joints and two
Shoulder joints). My first degree was in exercise physiology and I trained a lot of athletes before going back into nursing and a lot of my clients loved the book. There is even a golf version of the book Mark designed specifically for golfers.
post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbartho5 View Post

I played baseball in college my first time around, and picked up golf once baseball injuries ended my career... The cool thing about baseball and golf is that they both demand applying strength throughout a wide range of motion; the key is the balance of strength and flexibility. Say, as opposed to football, there is more demand for explosive strength and linear/lateral speed. (a running back is so musclebound that he can't really swing a club with a decent range of motion).

A really good book that you could buy on amazon for 5$ is called Core Performance by Mark Verstegen. It uses the idea that athletic strength should be founded on the core rectangle which is the torso and it's four corners (two hip joints and two
Shoulder joints). My first degree was in exercise physiology and I trained a lot of athletes before going back into nursing and a lot of my clients loved the book. There is even a golf version of the book Mark designed specifically for golfers.

 

 

100% agree with this. I started stretching after I work out more often, I can now touch my toes doing a hamstring stretch, Oh Yea!!! Core Performance is OK, I own the book. I recommend the rehabilitation section with the foam roller stuff. I did that the first time and caused my whole spine to pop from tailbone to upper back. Great for relaxing. If you want a deep massage, go use a tennis ball.

 

If I had to isolate and name areas that people need to exercise at its the hips. 

 

Gluts for power

Hamstrings to maintain proper posture through out the swing

Hip abductors and adductors for rotational stability and power

Abdominal for proper posture and rotational power

Quads for stability and power

 

What I do now is a one leg dead lift. I don't use weights for this. I just basically keeping my back in neutral and my core solid, i will bend over at the waist. My leg not on the ground will keep straight. I try to maintain a straight posture from head to leg the whole way. I just balance on my one leg. So I really work the whole leg I am balancing on. I can really feel it in the hamstring, the gluts, and the smaller muscles. I can really tell my left leg is not as balanced as my right. 

post #10 of 16
Right on saevel25... I think the biggest fitness misconception in any sport is that many people try to take the body building style workout regimen and apply that for use in a competitive sport. Learning to strengthen the core and build your full body strength for FUNCTIONAL strength is the goal in sports. Going to the gym and lifting biceps and back one day then chest and triceps the next day is going to strengthen those muscles for certain, but really they are only becoming stronger within the range of that particular lift.

Full body lifts that incorporate multiple muscle groups (dead lifts, cleans, squads, RDL's) even at very light weights using correct posture will transfer over to the golf course, basketball court, baseball diamond, etc with much better results.
post #11 of 16
I said this in another thread and I plan on writing up a review on it but Joey D golf fitness (http://joeydgolf.com/) has been the best golf monoty I've spent in a long time. It's a 30 Day three times per week program. It's basically P90X for golfers. Im actually wrapping up my last week and I dont want to sound like an infomercial but I went from hitting my driver 225 to most of my well struck drives in the 250-261 range. (Measuerd by GPS) My poorly struck drives are going about 240. Still not long but as a 22 hcp I feel I can work with those yardages. I feel like Im 100% in control of my swing these days. I could never say that before.
post #12 of 16
Hey guys, I would really recommend the fitness blender golf workout. It incorporates balance, strength, and flexibility all into one workout.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbartho5 View Post

Right on saevel25... I think the biggest fitness misconception in any sport is that many people try to take the body building style workout regimen and apply that for use in a competitive sport. Learning to strengthen the core and build your full body strength for FUNCTIONAL strength is the goal in sports. Going to the gym and lifting biceps and back one day then chest and triceps the next day is going to strengthen those muscles for certain, but really they are only becoming stronger within the range of that particular lift.

Full body lifts that incorporate multiple muscle groups (dead lifts, cleans, squads, RDL's) even at very light weights using correct posture will transfer over to the golf course, basketball court, baseball diamond, etc with much better results.


Amen. So true. Compound movements build the foundation that make you functionally strong and powerful in all endeavors.

post #14 of 16

Core strength exercises is all you need,
Squats, Deadlifts, Bench Press, also work on flexibility and stretching.

 

These exercises cover your body's entire foundation and you will do nothing but better your overall strength and agility. Strong legs & core = power

post #15 of 16

Agree with adzeemah, been doing http://madcow.wackyhq.com/geocities/5x5_Program/Linear_5x5.htm for 5 weeks now and have to say the idea behind it is simply brilliant.

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tepi View Post
 

Agree with adzeemah, been doing http://madcow.wackyhq.com/geocities/5x5_Program/Linear_5x5.htm for 5 weeks now and have to say the idea behind it is simply brilliant.


Wow! You posted a link to the bible of training for me. Bill Starr's 5 x 5 was the program I adhered to the most.

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