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Getting Fit for Golf

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

Hey guys, new to the forum but wanted to ask around about a golf specific work out program. I have a myTPI account and after looking through their exercises and drills I am a little overwhelmed. I have searched the internet as well and still have not really found anything to my liking. Any suggestions? What workouts do you guys use? Any help is greatly appreciated!!

 

 

post #2 of 21
Hi Paz, I'm sure there are a lot of different workout programs, many of which are better than mine, so I'll just respond to what I'm doing and get a reply going. I'm in my early 60's so I decided that it was time to get in the best golf shape I could this winter before my league starts again in late April. So anyway, I joined the local "Y" and hired a personal trainer for 5 consecutive sessions, 5 Saturdays apart. I told her I wanted to specifically work on my body for my golf game. She has been doing this for over 20 years, so she knew where to head with me and what I would need. Tomorrow will be my last session, then I am on my own with the program we have built up and documented together. So the gist of my response is really not to list my program out, that would take too long. What I am saying is, that for me, getting into an organized facility, with a professional trainer, and clarifying my needs, one on one, was the best thing I could have ever done. At 62, I already feel like I am in the best shape I have ever been in, in preparation for an upcoming golf season. And, I have several months until my league starts to continue now, and faithfully stick with it. I learned how to exercise, what muscles are used in golf, how to have and follow a workout program for the first time in my life, and how to set and accomplish goals for myself. I couldn't have done this at home, nor with the advise of let's say 'nonprofessional' trainers or workout advisors who may have good advice, but who don't give you the exact information you are asking for when you say "a golf specific work out program" I hope this helps some. :)
post #3 of 21

I started golfing a little over 2 years ago. I have invented dozens of drills with a bowflex and golf clubs. I've discarded drills that didn't work and kept the ones that do. I have a drill for the backswing, weight shift, pivot and follow through all with cables on a bowflex. I have a mat and a net in my back yard where I'll swing for 50 repetitions and then hit 3 balls to test impact position. Lately what I do every day unless I am golfing. I golf Thursday mornings and twice on Sundays at dawn, eat, then play another 18 walking only. The other 5 days I do 100 swings with an orange whip then jog 2 miles. That is my current routine and I am really hitting the ball well lately. I also practice putting on an 8 foot putting strip. I have another putting drill I do that uses a 2 ft. x 4 ft board with a 2.5 diameter hole at one end, I covered the board with felt and tilt it up 3 degrees and practice arcing the ball into the hole from 6in, 12 in, and 18in away. That drill really helped with 2 foot yips. Anyway sorry for the long winded response but that is my current routine. I started as a 105 golfer and am currently in the low to mid 90's. I have shot in the 80's a few times with a pr of 83. My goal is to be a consistent low to mid 80's golfer. I am 54 and completely obsessed with the game.

post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by pazimmer610 View Post
 

Hey guys, new to the forum but wanted to ask around about a golf specific work out program. I have a myTPI account and after looking through their exercises and drills I am a little overwhelmed. I have searched the internet as well and still have not really found anything to my liking. Any suggestions? What workouts do you guys use? Any help is greatly appreciated!!

 

 

Honestly I would suggest P90x or Insanity work out. They are not crazy Olympic style lifting, and they are designed for newbies as well. You'll probably feel like you are dying after you work out, but your body will adapt. The worst thing you can do is go out and try do something like a deadlift with to much weight and wrench your back out. Also those programs are a full body work out, which is important. 

post #5 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

 

Honestly I would suggest P90x or Insanity work out.

 

I like this, these are good general fitness type philosophies.  Though intense enough to be hard to maintain.

 

As for the OP - Golf doesn't really require one to be fit at all - seriously, look around the course, and even on the tours.  But being overall fit can help performance in anything you do.  Fitness and nutrition is just plain great goals for 'life' (and I think it makes activities more fun, including golf)

post #6 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post
 

 

I like this, these are good general fitness type philosophies.  Though intense enough to be hard to maintain.

 

As for the OP - Golf doesn't really require one to be fit at all - seriously, look around the course, and even on the tours.  But being overall fit can help performance in anything you do.  Fitness and nutrition is just plain great goals for 'life' (and I think it makes activities more fun, including golf)


The programs mentioned may help but I have seen countless people also injured form doing them.  They have kept many a therapist in business, I assure you.   Quantity is a far cry from quality. 

 

Golf may not require "fitness" in the traditional physiological/cardio sense.  However, the joint range and stability demands are far greater than many "sports" like running, cycling, rowing, and even swimming. 

post #7 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

 

 

Honestly I would suggest P90x or Insanity work out. They are not crazy Olympic style lifting, and they are designed for newbies as well. You'll probably feel like you are dying after you work out, but your body will adapt. The worst thing you can do is go out and try do something like a deadlift with to much weight and wrench your back out. Also those programs are a full body work out, which is important. 

 

+1 for this.  I'm a fan of pretty much any full-body workout with no or minimal weight lifting.  Love body weight resistance and flexibility stuff from pull-ups, push-ups, dips, to yoga or plyometrics (all of which are included in the P90x program).

 

Also, in the past 6 months or so I've gotten really into swimming.  Good full body workout (especially if you get fins and do some laps with fins, with or without a kickboard), good cardio workout too, and it emphasizes full range of motion back and shoulders strength and stability, and the core, which are important for golf.  You can mail it in and just sort of cruise, but if you go after it it can be a really good high-reps strength workout too.

post #8 of 21
I played baseball in college my first time around, and picked up golf once baseball injuries ended my career... The cool thing about baseball and golf is that they both demand applying strength throughout a wide range of motion; the key is the balance of strength and flexibility. Say, as opposed to football, there is more demand for explosive strength and linear/lateral speed. (a running back is so musclebound that he can't really swing a club with a decent range of motion).

A really good book that you could buy on amazon for 5$ is called Core Performance by Mark Verstegen. It uses the idea that athletic strength should be founded on the core rectangle which is the torso and it's four corners (two hip joints and two
Shoulder joints). My first degree was in exercise physiology and I trained a lot of athletes before going back into nursing and a lot of my clients loved the book. There is even a golf version of the book Mark designed specifically for golfers.
post #9 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbartho5 View Post

I played baseball in college my first time around, and picked up golf once baseball injuries ended my career... The cool thing about baseball and golf is that they both demand applying strength throughout a wide range of motion; the key is the balance of strength and flexibility. Say, as opposed to football, there is more demand for explosive strength and linear/lateral speed. (a running back is so musclebound that he can't really swing a club with a decent range of motion).

A really good book that you could buy on amazon for 5$ is called Core Performance by Mark Verstegen. It uses the idea that athletic strength should be founded on the core rectangle which is the torso and it's four corners (two hip joints and two
Shoulder joints). My first degree was in exercise physiology and I trained a lot of athletes before going back into nursing and a lot of my clients loved the book. There is even a golf version of the book Mark designed specifically for golfers.

 

 

100% agree with this. I started stretching after I work out more often, I can now touch my toes doing a hamstring stretch, Oh Yea!!! Core Performance is OK, I own the book. I recommend the rehabilitation section with the foam roller stuff. I did that the first time and caused my whole spine to pop from tailbone to upper back. Great for relaxing. If you want a deep massage, go use a tennis ball.

 

If I had to isolate and name areas that people need to exercise at its the hips. 

 

Gluts for power

Hamstrings to maintain proper posture through out the swing

Hip abductors and adductors for rotational stability and power

Abdominal for proper posture and rotational power

Quads for stability and power

 

What I do now is a one leg dead lift. I don't use weights for this. I just basically keeping my back in neutral and my core solid, i will bend over at the waist. My leg not on the ground will keep straight. I try to maintain a straight posture from head to leg the whole way. I just balance on my one leg. So I really work the whole leg I am balancing on. I can really feel it in the hamstring, the gluts, and the smaller muscles. I can really tell my left leg is not as balanced as my right. 

post #10 of 21
Right on saevel25... I think the biggest fitness misconception in any sport is that many people try to take the body building style workout regimen and apply that for use in a competitive sport. Learning to strengthen the core and build your full body strength for FUNCTIONAL strength is the goal in sports. Going to the gym and lifting biceps and back one day then chest and triceps the next day is going to strengthen those muscles for certain, but really they are only becoming stronger within the range of that particular lift.

Full body lifts that incorporate multiple muscle groups (dead lifts, cleans, squads, RDL's) even at very light weights using correct posture will transfer over to the golf course, basketball court, baseball diamond, etc with much better results.
post #11 of 21
I said this in another thread and I plan on writing up a review on it but Joey D golf fitness (http://joeydgolf.com/) has been the best golf monoty I've spent in a long time. It's a 30 Day three times per week program. It's basically P90X for golfers. Im actually wrapping up my last week and I dont want to sound like an infomercial but I went from hitting my driver 225 to most of my well struck drives in the 250-261 range. (Measuerd by GPS) My poorly struck drives are going about 240. Still not long but as a 22 hcp I feel I can work with those yardages. I feel like Im 100% in control of my swing these days. I could never say that before.
post #12 of 21
Hey guys, I would really recommend the fitness blender golf workout. It incorporates balance, strength, and flexibility all into one workout.
post #13 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbartho5 View Post

Right on saevel25... I think the biggest fitness misconception in any sport is that many people try to take the body building style workout regimen and apply that for use in a competitive sport. Learning to strengthen the core and build your full body strength for FUNCTIONAL strength is the goal in sports. Going to the gym and lifting biceps and back one day then chest and triceps the next day is going to strengthen those muscles for certain, but really they are only becoming stronger within the range of that particular lift.

Full body lifts that incorporate multiple muscle groups (dead lifts, cleans, squads, RDL's) even at very light weights using correct posture will transfer over to the golf course, basketball court, baseball diamond, etc with much better results.


Amen. So true. Compound movements build the foundation that make you functionally strong and powerful in all endeavors.

post #14 of 21

Core strength exercises is all you need,
Squats, Deadlifts, Bench Press, also work on flexibility and stretching.

 

These exercises cover your body's entire foundation and you will do nothing but better your overall strength and agility. Strong legs & core = power

post #15 of 21

Agree with adzeemah, been doing http://madcow.wackyhq.com/geocities/5x5_Program/Linear_5x5.htm for 5 weeks now and have to say the idea behind it is simply brilliant.

post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tepi View Post
 

Agree with adzeemah, been doing http://madcow.wackyhq.com/geocities/5x5_Program/Linear_5x5.htm for 5 weeks now and have to say the idea behind it is simply brilliant.


Wow! You posted a link to the bible of training for me. Bill Starr's 5 x 5 was the program I adhered to the most.

post #17 of 21

Is What We Eat Effect How We Play?

 

Getting 'golf-fit' is really important and what we eat on and off the golf course can definitely impact our total fitness...no matter what kind of golf workout plan we may be on.

 

As the first golf fitness training expert and physical therapist on the PGA Tour and now Director of Golf Fitness at the Cantigny Golf Academy in Wheaton, IL, I am asked constantly about what kind of special nutrition is best for golfers?

 

As golfers, it’s time to think more about what we eat and drink before and during our rounds if we want to reach our true potential. 

 

Golf isn’t the game it was 20 years ago. Golf is now much closer to “athlete” status and today’s golfers realize that they have to do everything they can to get an edge and that includes eating and drinking right – especially before and during a round. With the right food and drink you can save 3-5 shots per round (at least). Have you ever felt exhausted during or after a round of golf? Then you’re not eating and drinking properly.

 

Golf is a unique sport in that you’re playing for 4-5 hours which is a long time to be burning calories and using your brain. It’s not like most other sports where you play intensively for an hour or so and react to what’s going on. Instead you need to switch your focus on and off for (on average) 86 times per round and then perform a precise physical action which depends on how well you’ve prepared for it. To choose the right shot, align correctly, pick the right club, read the greens etc. and then make a smooth swing, requires mental sharpness and physical energy that you won’t have if you haven’t fueled your body properly.

 

Here’s all you need to know (right from the Tour player play-book) to make sure you’re firing on all cylinders right up until the last putt on the 18th green. I should add that if you’re playing with your buddies and use golf as a time to indulge and eat hot-dogs and drink beer then I have nothing against that! But if you want to perform as best you can then I would advise that you follow these simple ideas and experiment with how you feel and see what it does for your scores.

 

The best pre-round preparation without swinging a golf club.

 

The night before your round: Rest

Poor sleep affects growth hormone production and hence recovery from both physical and mental stress. You need a good quality sleep to think properly and access those mental skills you need for great performance. Here are a few tips to getting that great sleep before a big round:

 

Avoid alcohol: Although you get off to sleep quicker, it’s proven that you don’t reach the deeper levels of sleep to fully rest your brain and be sharp the following day.

Avoid drinking anything within 2 hours of going to bed: This way you avoid being woken up earlier than you need to go to the bathroom.

 

Avoid eating within 2 hours of going to bed: The increase in blood sugar inhibits sleep.

 

Hyrdrate like the Tour Pros:

Drinking water keeps your mind and body working properly and it’s critical for optimal brain function and muscle performance. If you’re thirsty, you’re already dehydrated, which limits your ability to concentrate and lowers your performance on the course. Being dehydrated by just 2-3% results in 10% lower performance which in an average round of golf, could be as high as 8 shots! The Tour pros take hydration very seriously and so should you, as it could make the difference between your best score and an average round.

Drink 16fl oz of water with your pre-round meal and another 8 fl oz (237 mL) 10 to 20 minutes before your round.

Make sipping water on every tee a habit (you’ll need to drink around 6fl oz every 30 minutes, more if it’s hot) as you’ll lose more and more electrolytes through sweat as the round progresses. Electrolytes is another term for the salts and minerals  that transmit electrical impulses across the cells in your body so that your muscles (and brain) work properly. When you sweat, you lose these electrolytes, so to maintain peak muscle and brain function, you need to replace them by drinking water and/or electrolyte solutions.

 

The best pre-round meal: Ideas for your meal before round of golf

Eat your pre-round meal about 2-3 hours before you play and eat a snack an hour before you head to the first tee. Studies show that a meal containing 200-300g of carbohydrates 2-3 hours before playing increase athletic performance. If you have an early morning round, be sure to have a healthy breakfast at least an hour before playing. The quality of the carbohydrate is important. Poor quality (starchy) carbohydrates like bagels, pancakes and donuts give you a surge of energy and raise insulin levels and eventually you crash and become lethargic. You want to focus on those carbs you get from fruit and vegetables and if you eat bread, pasta or bagels, make sure they’re whole wheat.  You don’t need much fat or fiber but include a moderate amount of protein. Eat just enough to be neither hungry or full.

 

Good examples would be:

Vegetable omelet with fruit
Bowl of steel-cut oatmeal with nuts
Grilled chicken or fish with salad and vegetables (Tiger’s choice)
Grilled chicken sandwich with soup
Whole wheat spaghetti and pasta sauce.
Whole wheat bagel with light cream cheese
Yogurt and fruit
Whole wheat toast and scrambled eggs

 

Snacks to eat before and during your round of golf

Eat these snacks in small amounts throughout the round to maintain energy and concentration levels. Small bites at regular intervals, just enough not to get hungry or full

 

What the pros eat during a round* from Golf Digest:

Bill Haas: Fruit and nuts
Fredrik Jacobsen: Jerky
Adam Scott: Clif Bars
Yani Seng: Meiji bars (Chocolate covered almonds)
Aaron Baddley: Almonds
Jim Furyk: Lara Bars
Steve Marino: Nuun tablets in water
Ben Crane: Back Nine Electrolyte Tablets
Matt Kuchar: Almonds
Brittany Lincicome: Peant butter and Jelly Sandwich
Ben Curtis: granola bars and Amino Vital
Martin Laird: Vitalyte Electrolyte Tablets
Phil Mickelson: Bananas
Keegan Bradley: Peanut butter and jelly sandwiches on multigrain bread, almonds, raisins, peanuts, trail mix, and always packs a few Clif Bars

 

Double bogey drinks and meals/snacks to avoid before and during golf:

Coffee (too much caffeine)
Fruit Juice (too much sugar)
Soda (too much sugar)
Energy drinks and bars (too much caffeine and sugar)
Fried breakfast (empty calories)
Pancakes (refined carbohydrate that will give you a burst of energy then make you crash)
Donuts (as above)
Most breakfast cereal (as above)
Anything that lacks carbs like scrambled eggs with no toast
Hot dogs (too high in sodium and saturated fat)
Most Granola Bars (too much sugar)
Beer: It’s a sedative and (unfortunately) will affect your coordination.

 

Many of the pros and players that I work with (including myself) have started using a system of products that are organic, whole food and packed with nutrients and highly bio-available protein but also low calorie. Not only do these systems balance out blood sugar allowing me to maintain a consistent mental focus but they also help to generally improve health leading to excess fat loss and lean muscle development. And they will improve your golf game too…

 

Again, it took me a while to buy into the idea but now I wouldn’t go a day (and especially a round of golf) with the following in my body….

1. A meal replacement shake.  Great protein carbs and healthy fats.  A much better alternative to the typical brands out there.

2. Energy shots (the healthy version full of 100% organic nutrients from whole foods) the doesn’t get you jittery but rather increases endurance strength and mental focus.

3. Supplemental nutrients.  A daily vitamin pack that goes my body everything it needs that it isn’t getting in today’s food supply.  Including the key athlete nutrients of resveratrol, vitamin D3 and CoQ10.

 

Those are just a few of the key systems/products I use and recommend to those I know and care about.   If you’re looking for the specific system I use let me know and I can direct you to the info.

post #18 of 21

The key thing to consider with 'any' golf fitness training program is that it should customized and golf-specific.  Easier said than done, I know!  It really takes an assessment from a trusted golf fitness professional who has known expertise in golf-specific fitness training.  This may take some research and speaking with references but you should be able to find a professional golf fitness specialist to take you through an initial evaluation.  Only then will you know what you should be doing with your golf workout so it is safe for you and will meet your individual conditioning needs as well as your golf performance goals.  If you want any further guidance, let me know...  Always happy to help!

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