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Left arm straight. - Page 2

post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil McGleno View Post

You need a My Swing thread.-Simple as that.

Nobody can really give you any answers without seeing.

I let people bend their left elbow if they can do it and still hit the ball solidly.-Youre probably compensating for a smaller turn or somethin.

 

Probably true - the bit in bold.

 

Nothing against a My Swing thread - but that's surely not the answer to my question.

 

If poor mobility is the root cause of a bent left arm (mine or the OP's) - then surely you would test that by way of physical screens, not a swing video. 

 

I haven't been through TPI - though I'd like to. There are also some well-regarded general physical screens here - http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-instruction/2011-09/combine-tests#slide=1

 

For lots of reasons, I wouldn't worry myself about a bent left arm unless and until I could pass the basic physical mobility tests (and right now, I'm a clear fail on 3 so I've got work to do).

post #20 of 28
Youd be wrong-A lot of people bend their left arm and dont turn as much as they can because they dont know how properly-Not because they CANNOT turn more. Like with the back knee staying bent a Lot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by birlyshirly View Post

Probably true - the bit in bold.

Nothing against a My Swing thread - but that's surely not the answer to my question.

If poor mobility is the root cause of a bent left arm (mine or the OP's) - then surely you would test that by way of physical screens, not a swing video.
post #21 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by birlyshirly View Post
 

 

 

If poor mobility is the root cause of a bent left arm (mine or the OP's) - then surely you would test that by way of physical screens, not a swing video. 

 

From my experience (and other competent instructors I know) it rarely is.  People don't turn enough (or don't know how to turn enough), hips slide back, arms lift and bend to complete some sort of backswing.  It's a knowledge thing, not a physical barrier.  

post #22 of 28
It was a long time before anybody explained to me to try to keep my hands as far out as possible, even feeling like I was pushing out rather than locking up elbows. I wasnt ready to understand how that leverage would help me. In my mind I saw the swing as a circle and would bring my hands up following that incorrect circle thought, rather than keeping them low and away with tension not tightness.
post #23 of 28

Hmm - I'm not saying technique doesn't come into it. I'm just saying that it seems sensible to me to rule out poor physical mobility first.

 

In my own case, I think I could make a "full" shoulder turn, but right now I'd do it by overturning my hips. I don't think my hips are sliding. Of course, we could then argue about what makes for "over turned hips". But that's my point - I think the physical screens make for a good, objective measure of physical capability. And if I pass basic physical benchmarks, then I can worry about technique down the line. 

 

What I do know is this. In the last 40-odd years, I've done close to zero golf-specific fitness work and very minimal stretching or flexibility work.  I don't get to play enough golf for that to count. I have measurably poor flexibility for just about any activity, regardless of whether you see golf as an athletic endeavour or not. But I can't think of another sport where flexibility wouldn't count as part of your "fitness" to practice any part of the required technique. Heck, I have flexibility issues just riding a bike. So given what I know about my current level of agility - it seems sensible to me to check that avenue out before worrying about a bent left arm, or indeed many other positional niceties.

 

But for all I know, your typical students come to you with better flexibility than I currently enjoy - and it usually IS a technique issue. Again, that's what I see being the purpose and value of the screens.

post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by birlyshirly View Post

Hmm - I'm not saying technique doesn't come into it. I'm just saying that it seems sensible to me to rule out poor physical mobility first.

In my own case, I think I could make a "full" shoulder turn, but right now I'd do it by overturning my hips. I don't think my hips are sliding. Of course, we could then argue about what makes for "over turned hips". But that's my point - I think the physical screens make for a good, objective measure of physical capability. And if I pass basic physical benchmarks, then I can worry about technique down the line. 

What I do know is this. In the last 40-odd years, I've done close to zero golf-specific fitness work and very minimal stretching or flexibility work.  I don't get to play enough golf for that to count. I have measurably poor flexibility for just about any activity, regardless of whether you see golf as an athletic endeavour or not. But I can't think of another sport where flexibility wouldn't count as part of your "fitness" to practice any part of the required technique. Heck, I have flexibility issues just riding a bike. So given what I know about my current level of agility - it seems sensible to me to check that avenue out before worrying about a bent left arm, or indeed many other positional niceties.

But for all I know, your typical students come to you with better flexibility than I currently enjoy - and it usually IS a technique issue. Again, that's what I see being the purpose and value of the screens.
But what you're saying is poor agility/physical limitation is the root cause then it would make sense that a compensation happens creating a swing flaw. Seeing this swing flaw on video would help identify the limitations I would think. I try not to get too far invested in the TPI thing. Bottom line: swing within your means. If done, less compensations will be made.
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jclark View Post


But what you're saying is poor agility/physical limitation is the root cause then it would make sense that a compensation happens creating a swing flaw. Seeing this swing flaw on video would help identify the limitations I would think. I try not to get too far invested in the TPI thing. Bottom line: swing within your means. If done, less compensations will be made.

Broadly, I'd agree - with perhaps a slightly different emphasis. I'd argue that identifying physical limitations should help you understand your compensations/flaws, and maybe leave some alone on the basis that you state. Swing within your means.

post #26 of 28
I bet someone who doesnt turn as much as a young person might could outdrive the majority of players by just knowing how to attain a lag position and hold that postion until low in the swing. I have seen video where the lag angle actually gets smaller toward the point of release as they bring hands and club butt down together. I watched a long driver on golf chan bend his club across his left shoulder, and before it could flex back he was through transition and swinging around tight to his body with a bent left arm and loaded shaft. I just have never seen anyone load with a shoulder! I get the idea the bent left is a body turn move producing higher rpm the same way an ice skater spins faster with the arms closer to the body and slower when arms are extended. I would imagine all that could be learned, in compensating for a physical problem.
post #27 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikeparker View Post
 

Is this really crucial to a golf swing because i don't have my left arm straight... it's not really even close to being either.

I can lock my left arm out through the swing of course and it doesn't feel right and i seem to loose distance because i cant even come close to how far back i can when i don't lock my arm out. Will having my left arm straight help me in the long run. 

 

Thanks,

Mike

 

I'm starting to learn that it's not absolutely required.  Between reading about how bad and unnecessary it is to overswing and the importance of keeping a straight left arm (for a righty) I figured locking the arm in place was the right thing to do.  Only recently have I started to be a little less strict about it and I'm hitting much, much longer drives as a result.

 

I'm still keeping a straight arm with my irons though but I may start experimenting with that as well because my iron distances seem poor compared to pretty much everyone I know.

post #28 of 28

Yeah Indeed its quite difficult to play as left armer.

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