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Left arm straight. - Page 2

post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil McGleno View Post

You need a My Swing thread.-Simple as that.

Nobody can really give you any answers without seeing.

I let people bend their left elbow if they can do it and still hit the ball solidly.-Youre probably compensating for a smaller turn or somethin.

 

Probably true - the bit in bold.

 

Nothing against a My Swing thread - but that's surely not the answer to my question.

 

If poor mobility is the root cause of a bent left arm (mine or the OP's) - then surely you would test that by way of physical screens, not a swing video. 

 

I haven't been through TPI - though I'd like to. There are also some well-regarded general physical screens here - http://www.golfdigest.com/golf-instruction/2011-09/combine-tests#slide=1

 

For lots of reasons, I wouldn't worry myself about a bent left arm unless and until I could pass the basic physical mobility tests (and right now, I'm a clear fail on 3 so I've got work to do).

post #20 of 25
Youd be wrong-A lot of people bend their left arm and dont turn as much as they can because they dont know how properly-Not because they CANNOT turn more. Like with the back knee staying bent a Lot.
Quote:
Originally Posted by birlyshirly View Post

Probably true - the bit in bold.

Nothing against a My Swing thread - but that's surely not the answer to my question.

If poor mobility is the root cause of a bent left arm (mine or the OP's) - then surely you would test that by way of physical screens, not a swing video.
post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by birlyshirly View Post
 

 

 

If poor mobility is the root cause of a bent left arm (mine or the OP's) - then surely you would test that by way of physical screens, not a swing video. 

 

From my experience (and other competent instructors I know) it rarely is.  People don't turn enough (or don't know how to turn enough), hips slide back, arms lift and bend to complete some sort of backswing.  It's a knowledge thing, not a physical barrier.  

post #22 of 25
It was a long time before anybody explained to me to try to keep my hands as far out as possible, even feeling like I was pushing out rather than locking up elbows. I wasnt ready to understand how that leverage would help me. In my mind I saw the swing as a circle and would bring my hands up following that incorrect circle thought, rather than keeping them low and away with tension not tightness.
post #23 of 25

Hmm - I'm not saying technique doesn't come into it. I'm just saying that it seems sensible to me to rule out poor physical mobility first.

 

In my own case, I think I could make a "full" shoulder turn, but right now I'd do it by overturning my hips. I don't think my hips are sliding. Of course, we could then argue about what makes for "over turned hips". But that's my point - I think the physical screens make for a good, objective measure of physical capability. And if I pass basic physical benchmarks, then I can worry about technique down the line. 

 

What I do know is this. In the last 40-odd years, I've done close to zero golf-specific fitness work and very minimal stretching or flexibility work.  I don't get to play enough golf for that to count. I have measurably poor flexibility for just about any activity, regardless of whether you see golf as an athletic endeavour or not. But I can't think of another sport where flexibility wouldn't count as part of your "fitness" to practice any part of the required technique. Heck, I have flexibility issues just riding a bike. So given what I know about my current level of agility - it seems sensible to me to check that avenue out before worrying about a bent left arm, or indeed many other positional niceties.

 

But for all I know, your typical students come to you with better flexibility than I currently enjoy - and it usually IS a technique issue. Again, that's what I see being the purpose and value of the screens.

post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by birlyshirly View Post

Hmm - I'm not saying technique doesn't come into it. I'm just saying that it seems sensible to me to rule out poor physical mobility first.

In my own case, I think I could make a "full" shoulder turn, but right now I'd do it by overturning my hips. I don't think my hips are sliding. Of course, we could then argue about what makes for "over turned hips". But that's my point - I think the physical screens make for a good, objective measure of physical capability. And if I pass basic physical benchmarks, then I can worry about technique down the line. 

What I do know is this. In the last 40-odd years, I've done close to zero golf-specific fitness work and very minimal stretching or flexibility work.  I don't get to play enough golf for that to count. I have measurably poor flexibility for just about any activity, regardless of whether you see golf as an athletic endeavour or not. But I can't think of another sport where flexibility wouldn't count as part of your "fitness" to practice any part of the required technique. Heck, I have flexibility issues just riding a bike. So given what I know about my current level of agility - it seems sensible to me to check that avenue out before worrying about a bent left arm, or indeed many other positional niceties.

But for all I know, your typical students come to you with better flexibility than I currently enjoy - and it usually IS a technique issue. Again, that's what I see being the purpose and value of the screens.
But what you're saying is poor agility/physical limitation is the root cause then it would make sense that a compensation happens creating a swing flaw. Seeing this swing flaw on video would help identify the limitations I would think. I try not to get too far invested in the TPI thing. Bottom line: swing within your means. If done, less compensations will be made.
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by jclark View Post


But what you're saying is poor agility/physical limitation is the root cause then it would make sense that a compensation happens creating a swing flaw. Seeing this swing flaw on video would help identify the limitations I would think. I try not to get too far invested in the TPI thing. Bottom line: swing within your means. If done, less compensations will be made.

Broadly, I'd agree - with perhaps a slightly different emphasis. I'd argue that identifying physical limitations should help you understand your compensations/flaws, and maybe leave some alone on the basis that you state. Swing within your means.

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