or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › Identifying Areas of Improvement
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Identifying Areas of Improvement

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 

Curious how people do this

 

Easiest is just to mentally take note of things that have been costing you strokes and working on them.

 

I've seen and currently use the Short Game / Long Game Handicaps to split it into those two areas.

 

Lately I've been going all OCD on it and breaking it into 6 areas: Tee Shots, Putting, Iron Accuracy, Iron Ball Striking, Club Selection and Chipping/Pitching. I'll go back through a round and attribute each dropped stroke to one category and then see if one particular area stands out over several rounds. For example the last couple rounds my Iron Accuracy and Ball Striking has cost me the most strokes (push/pull or hook, thin or fat etc) so tonight I headed to the range and focused on those two things the most.

 

Of course all these areas can always get better but I am trying to keep everything moving steadily in the right direction and don't want one particular area to get way out of whack (e.g. my game is great but I just can't putt or I just can't get off the tee in good shape etc).

post #2 of 14

My goal is to get my HC into the single digits, so sometimes I look at the average stats for a 9 HC, or for breaking 80, or something like that and compare it to my stats.  That gives me an idea of my strengths and weaknesses.

 

But I don't really use that information to direct my practice regimen.  I try to play once a week and to hit the range once a week.  When I go to the range, I'm just working on implementing my latest lesson.  As the season starts to approach I'll spend more time on the short game and putting to try to regain my feel.  But mostly I focus on the long game/driving range and work on the short game before a round or if I have time, after the driving range.  

post #3 of 14
This is definitely an interesting topic. FIR and GIR and putts/round just don't tell the story. I had thoughts last season of doing a subjective measure of every shot, ranking each from 0-10 or something.

First visualize the shot you want to hit. Then score it yourself like a gymnast judge. Did you execute the shot you wanted?

After the round, you can categorize them and see how the totals work out.

Maybe on drives, you are 105/140, but on chips you are 95/200, and putts you are 265/330. Would show you that you could gain more from practicing chips than in smacking drives at the range or putting.

The key would be setting up the right categories (maybe long lag putts are separate category from short putts, for example) and having the discipline to track the data. Not sure I have the energy.
post #4 of 14

I'm a stat / note / journal JUNKY!!!

 

I keep basic stats on my phone (golflogix / foursum - just downloaded) - FIR, GIR, # of putts, # of chips, etc.

 

Also, I mark my score card with tee shots - Arrow left or right depending where I missed the fairway or green.

 

I'm working on a spread sheet so I can better record all my shots in a round & determine tendencies / areas of weakness.

 

 

One thing I just started doing was to create a "Deliberate Practice" journal.

 

Practice with a purpose ... I break down what area's of the game I just worked on, what was working, what wasn't working and why ... I also end each journal entry with a "take-away" or two = something specific that you noticed & how to fix or replicate ...

 

 

Rob 

post #5 of 14

Recently read a book called NO3PUTTS and made a lot of sense.

I am a 14 handicap golfer and can only hit driver about 230- so it would be difficult for me to add distance to my game.

But putting I could/can improve without and physical training or big changes. Can also practice any time I have a hour spare and only need one club to practice with.

My aim in 2014 is to get from 14 down to 10 with mostly improving my putting.

 

I will keep you all updated on Number of putts per round.

My first 2 rounds of 2014 had 39 and 41 Putts...:cry:both rounds were 94s but only getting back into golf after 4yrs out.

post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by handicap14 View Post
 

I am a 14 handicap golfer and can only hit driver about 230- so it would be difficult for me to add distance to my game.

 

Why do you assume you can't add distance?

post #7 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

Why do you assume you can't add distance?

Cause I have tried lol

To be honest most of my problems anyway are hitting irons and also finding the time to practice.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by handicap14 View Post

 

I am a 14 handicap golfer and can only hit driver about 230- so it would be difficult for me to add distance to my game.

 

When I was a ~14 I felt like I crushed the ball if it hit the 30-40' tall fence at the back of the range at 235-240 yards on the fly.  Now as a ~9 it's a mishit if I don't clear that fence, and with new work on using the hips and body more correctly I've added a few more yards quite recently.  My best golf buddy is maybe 5'9", 155, also plays off a ~9, and he easily averages over 280 carry+roll with the driver, and on good days will put a few 3 woods off the tee out to 260-270.  As a 14 who drives it ~230 I guarantee you can add distance unless you're quite old or have health issues that don't allow you to make full swings.

post #9 of 14

Usually I've just kept count of my FIR, GIR, and putts. The only thing I've gathered from that is that my putting is the stronger part of my game, and everything else needs work.

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandallT View Post

This is definitely an interesting topic. FIR and GIR and putts/round just don't tell the story. I had thoughts last season of doing a subjective measure of every shot, ranking each from 0-10 or something.

First visualize the shot you want to hit. Then score it yourself like a gymnast judge. Did you execute the shot you wanted?

After the round, you can categorize them and see how the totals work out.

Maybe on drives, you are 105/140, but on chips you are 95/200, and putts you are 265/330. Would show you that you could gain more from practicing chips than in smacking drives at the range or putting.

The key would be setting up the right categories (maybe long lag putts are separate category from short putts, for example) and having the discipline to track the data. Not sure I have the energy.

I like this idea. I may have to steal this from you, if you don't mind.

post #11 of 14

Identify root cause; apply corrective action.  I agree with this strategy and use it.  When you start keeping track of where shots were being lost, it's easy to identify certain areas of your game (like OP stated) and practice for improvement.

 

I guess the 'self-help' route is a good first step. However, some items may require require professional help to affect positive change.  That's kind of where I am right now.  I've fixed (for the most part) my short game to where it rarely costs me.  Next up is lessons this year to help with the mid-range game for more consistent contact leading to hitting more greens from 160 and closer.

 

dave 

post #12 of 14

I guess I really am a lazy cuss, but keeping real close track of /recording the results of each shot is too much work while I'm playing.  However, when I hit a poor shot I sort of make a mental note of it.  By the end of the game I usually have a feel for where I lost the most strokes and that area becomes my primary focus for practice for a bit.

post #13 of 14

My area of improvement is in my swing. The last thing that I have to and am currently working on is my release. I have a little trouble releasing to one o'clock with a full extension. I'm getting much better as I've been working hard on it but I still find myself releasing across my chest. I've started to put a coin about 12 inches in front of my ball as a target to release to in order to get me to extend properly. This really works as I'm really improving in this fundamental.

post #14 of 14
I started using golfshots toward the end of last season to track my stats. Not sure, in it of itself, the stats told me anything I didn't already intuitively know about where my weakness were. I do think keeping stats is helpful, though, to see if you really are progressing on the those areas you are working on. For me, this year is going to be all about accuracy off the tee and on my approach shots so I'm going to be interested in seeing how my fairways hit and GIR's track throughout the year and compared to last.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Golf Talk
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › Identifying Areas of Improvement