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Indoor Golf Facility

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I’ve come across an indoor golf centre in Glasgow, Scotland which is very conveniently located for me. It has a chipping area with bunker, a separate putting green and a 30 yard range. http://www.indoorgolfacademies.co.uk/facilities

 

The short game is something I neglect badly. The range I normally go to is well protected from the elements but the short game area is obviously outdoor and a no go area in bad weather or winter evenings. The thought of getting consistent short game practice is very appealing.

 

It looks great but I’m wondering if a 30 yard range is really any use? My bad shot is a push fade. On this range though every shot has hit the net before you can see it’s true flight! 

 

I’m guessing that indoor artificial greens are perfectly fine for chipping and putting – is that generally the case?

 

Interested to hear the views of people who have used similar facilities? 

post #2 of 7

I go to an indoor facility here in Minnesota and it's absolutely amazing...best golf money ever spent. I use the short game area A LOT. Yes the artificial turf is a bit harder and faster but my chipping has still increased 10 fold. 

 

I took a look at your facility, it reminds me very much of my own. 

http://mngolfacademy.com/

If you have the funds I'd definitely do it. It's only $40 a month for me which in my opinion is an absolute steal...and a MUST in this crappy winter. 

post #3 of 7

We have about 10-15 yards before we hit our net, and it's well worth it. You don't need to see your ball flight to know what kind of shot you hit.

 

You haven't listed your handicap (please do), but it's unlikely the shape of your shots is the only or even biggest concern: if it's higher, quality of contact is likely your first issue. You said you shoot over 100, and you never posted a DTL view on your My Swing thread.

 

Indoors can be VERY beneficial partly because you don't WORRY about your ball flight - you worry more about making good changes.

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 

I now shoot under 100 and I believe once the season starts I will break 90 for the first time. 

 

I've got a DTL on my iphone and I'll hopefully upload tonight. 

 

I actually don't have an official handicap yet purely as I don't play medals and tend to play a lot of different courses as a visitor. I regularly shoot around 45 on my local par 33 and my record is 40. 

 

I hit balls for 30 minutes on the short range and I only visibly duffed one. On the proper range I'd expect to see a few push fades and the odd hook. However I know what you mean about letting you focus on making changes without worrying about the ball flight, and I certainly focused on getting nice crisp contact. 

 

Thanks for the comments

post #5 of 7

Your range sounds like a great setup.

 

I go to the same place as Crim.  Great facility, even better people.

 

Short game - My chipping is improved immensely - can't wait for the good weather.  My putting technique is much better.

 

Hitting - 30 yards is great.  Pick a spot on the wall to aim around.  (think either a horizontal line for up/down/trajectory drills, a vertical line for left right control (face angle and club path type drills), or a spot or circle (break the glass).  At an open range, you don't get that....---a distinct target to hit--

 

I try to hit a nice draw club path while while striking my 'line' about a foot to the right.  When I exaggerate my fade and draw swings, I can see curvature (so I know I can do it, though at 30 yards, if I'm curving it enough to 'easily' see it, I know it's too much - but it helps my learning).  It's perfect for face angle drills.  I also like to work on up and down.  A fun drill with a friend is to try to hit the wall within a couple feet of where the other hits it (sometimes using different clubs even).  ((key word is 'try', however, it used to be just random 'spraying' now I feel very confident to get close (more like a few feet, not a couple)))

 

We also have bays with track man if we are really interested in the true details of our swings..

 

but - Erik nailed it.  At the beginning, the big win is being able to work on contact.  For me it's usually about 4-5 days a week - even if it's just 15 minutes over lunch.  My ability to hit the ball, shape the ball, control the up/down angle, is greatly approved.

 

 

One setback - since it's so easy to just go all the time, it takes a bit of constraint to not just go 'hit' all the time.  Having a plan of attack and goals and drills can be left behind for just some relaxing time killing (not that it's bad, but it's different than working on improvements).

 

I also suspect that when I get back outside, I'll likely be hitting a little thick for a bit. 

post #6 of 7

It took me awhile to get used to the idea, but @iacas is right - when you don.'t focus on ball flight - you focus more on changing the picture, focus more on changing the feel, feels.

 

But when I see this, too bad you can't play golf here.

 

 

http://www.playersparadisesoccer.com/indoorturfadvantagesp6.php

post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post
 

Hitting - 30 yards is great.  Pick a spot on the wall to aim around.  (think either a horizontal line for up/down/trajectory drills, a vertical line for left right control (face angle and club path type drills), or a spot or circle (break the glass).  At an open range, you don't get that....---a distinct target to hit--

 

 

I'll give that a try, thanks!

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