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What about this method for sensing fat shots on mats?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

This is just brainstorming but.... Cut out a pork chop sized divot out of the mat in front of the ball. If you hit ball first, you'll catch very little mat or none. If you hit anywhere near fat, you catch the mat or lots of it. Wonder if some guy already thunk of this and it never took. Anyways, that's my deep thoughts Jack "golf" Handey contribution for today.

post #2 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevets88 View Post
 

This is just brainstorming but.... Cut out a pork chop sized divot out of the mat in front of the ball. If you hit ball first, you'll catch very little mat or none. If you hit anywhere near fat, you catch the mat or lots of it. Wonder if some guy already thunk of this and it never took. Anyways, that's my deep thoughts Jack "golf" Handey contribution for today.

I thought for a second you were recommending hitting off a pork chop!  :-P

post #3 of 26
Wait, why not just hit off the very front of the mat?
post #4 of 26

Put the ball on the tee, and if you catch any mat at all you hit it fat. You're welcome. :-D

post #5 of 26

One time a few years ago I got the big idea of painting a line on the mat and placing the ball just in front of the paint line so I would see just how fat I was hitting the ball.

 

In a surprisingly short amount of time the paint was all gone. :surrender: 

 

(And it felt like I was hitting the ball very well).

post #6 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamo View Post

Wait, why not just hit off the very front of the mat?

I knew someone would ask this. Your target side foot is lower. You could fashion a piece for the foot but it's loose.
post #7 of 26

I use 1.5" blue masking tape. Run a line of it and put the ball just on the other side. Hit anything but ball first and the club rips it off. I leave my mat set up with a rolled up rag about a foot behind the ball and the tape line 24/7. I also use black dry erase marker. It comes off the club and leaves a light mark, kind of simulates a divot, the area in front of the tape is a tad darker from the marker. Can also see where the ball comes off the face and how far it got into the mat and use that as a gauge.

post #8 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevets88 View Post

I knew someone would ask this. Your target side foot is lower. You could fashion a piece for the foot but it's loose.

Ah, right. I suppose if your range was open enough, you could push two mats together. You'd have to stagger them so that you can stand on the front one, but have it open in front of the ball. If the surface beneath the mats has enough friction you should be okay.
post #9 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamo View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nevets88 View Post

I knew someone would ask this. Your target side foot is lower. You could fashion a piece for the foot but it's loose.

Ah, right. I suppose if your range was open enough, you could push two mats together. You'd have to stagger them so that you can stand on the front one, but have it open in front of the ball. If the surface beneath the mats has enough friction you should be okay.


I was going to ask the same question you did.

 

However, the ranges around here would look very unfavorably to taking two mats.

post #10 of 26

climbing chalk, baby powder, etc

put it down lightly and you can see (approx) where your divot would have started and ended

 

 

 

However, my normal method is pretty good.  if my hands are buzzing, it was either fat or a hard bladed shot - and I can see by the flight which is which.  if they feel fine, I caught it well.  :-D

post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post
 

climbing chalk, baby powder, etc

 

put it down lightly and you can see (approx) where your divot would have started and ended

 

I used this once, but noticed that it would cake up over time. If I got the same mat again in the future, I would notice that it was really hard.

post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

 

I used this once, but noticed that it would cake up over time. If I got the same mat again in the future, I would notice that it was really hard.


wierd - I found that it would just go away as long as it was put down very lightly.  Mats collect dust normally anyway, so I don't see much difference.  The indoor range I hit at is so very dusty, that my grooves fill in.  This isn't any worse than that.

post #13 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jamo View Post

Ah, right. I suppose if your range was open enough, you could push two mats together. You'd have to stagger them so that you can stand on the front one, but have it open in front of the ball. If the surface beneath the mats has enough friction you should be okay.

That would work. Ultimately many on the site have the best fat sensor tool - a high fps camera. But this is my "low budget, low tech" version.
post #14 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post


I was going to ask the same question you did.

However, the ranges around here would look very unfavorably to taking two mats.

Yeah, that's probably true. The one I go to in the winter is generally pretty open (it's an indoor soccer dome), so I can move my mat all around if I need to make room to set up my camera.
post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by rehmwa View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

 

I used this once, but noticed that it would cake up over time. If I got the same mat again in the future, I would notice that it was really hard.


wierd - I found that it would just go away as long as it was put down very lightly.  Mats collect dust normally anyway, so I don't see much difference.  The indoor range I hit at is so very dusty, that my grooves fill in.  This isn't any worse than that.


True, I used the old type of chalk which cakes when it gets wet. I only did this a few times, until I noticed that it seemed to cake up the mats. Luckily, I'm left handed, and I did not affect that many golfers.

 

I did hit them a few times (numerous practice swings) to soften them up again, then just use the scuff to gauge my shots.

 

Some people seem to be able to hear the difference, but it's really hard for me to self assess it.

 

BTW, what kind of climbing do you do? Bouldering? Free? clean trad?, Sport? Big Wall?

post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post



BTW, what kind of climbing do you do? Bouldering? Free? clean trad?, Sport? Big Wall?

Big Momma...
post #17 of 26

All the ranges around me actually bolt the mats to the concrete..lol

 

I like the idea of laying a piece of painters masking tape down, although if it's quite, I can hear a swoosh sound if I hit the ball correctly.

 

Hmm, just happen to have some blue painters tape here..:-D

post #18 of 26

I've tried putting tape just behind the ball and it works really well. You can quickly reuse the same bit of tape over and over again as well so it's actually pretty convenient. 

 

Another method is putting tape about 6 inches in front of the ball. You then hit the ball and try and take the tape away as well. This is excellent way of intuitively stopping yourself from flipping and ensuring that you take a divot after contact. 

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