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Were we wrong?? Kid Got First Birdie and We Yelled - Page 2

post #19 of 74

Please.....it was a spontaneous reaction.  Happens all the time, including the tours.  I don't think this would be construed as bad etiquette.  The guy was probably having a bad day.  I wouldn't give it another thought.   And because you posted this in the rules forum..........

 

 

1-4/1

Player Distracted by Ball Dropped by Another Player Mis-Hits Ball

 

Q. As A was making his backswing, B accidentally dropped a ball, which rolled within six inches of A's ball. The appearance of the dropped ball startled A, causing him to top his shot. In equity, should A be permitted to replay his stroke?

 

A. No. Distractions are a common occurrence which players must accept

post #20 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by dave s View Post
 

The old folk set seem to have a sense of entitlement every where they go because they are, well ... old.  I see it, but I don't agree with it at all.

 

Golf is supposed to be fun, like enjoying the birdie your son made.  Don't think twice about what happened.  It's over and done with.  You did the right thing by explaining to your son why the comment was made by the other players on the course.  End of discussion.  Back to enjoying your family on the course.

 

dave

 

I think that you are a bit confused as to who is the entitled ones here.  What those other guys were doing wasn't infringing on anyone else's fun until they were impacted by the actions of the other group.  What gave that other group the right to take such action?  Seems to me that they were the ones who were seeing entitlement where none should exist.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dormie1360 View Post
 

Please.....it was a spontaneous reaction.  Happens all the time, including the tours.  I don't think this would be construed as bad etiquette.  The guy was probably having a bad day.  I wouldn't give it another thought.   And because you posted this in the rules forum..........

 

 

1-4/1

Player Distracted by Ball Dropped by Another Player Mis-Hits Ball

 

Q. As A was making his backswing, B accidentally dropped a ball, which rolled within six inches of A's ball. The appearance of the dropped ball startled A, causing him to top his shot. In equity, should A be permitted to replay his stroke?

 

A. No. Distractions are a common occurrence which players must accept

 

 

This decision relates to an accident - accidents happen.  Yelling loudly is avoidable.

 

I can understand that a young player making a birdie may let something slip out, and he should be congratulated for the great shot and allowed to enjoy the experience.  He should still be advised that it's not proper to do so, and he should apologize to anyone who does take exception to his outburst..  The guys who immediately took umbrage with his act were also hasty in getting on a kid who might have just made a milestone in his game.

post #21 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

This decision relates to an accident - accidents happen.  Yelling loudly is avoidable.

 

No… the question had the word "accident" in it. The actual decision or the answer part of it made no such delineation. It simply said that distractions occur. It did not give a separate ruling for "non-accidental distractions."

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

So all of you are okay with me letting out a whoop of joy in the middle of your backswing on the next tee, causing you to dribble your drive 10 feet off the tee box?  Or would you just not count that one and take a mulligan?  

 

Yep. Bummer for you, but I've played golf while someone cranks up a mower. A phone in a neighboring apartment rings. Someone yells "Get me a beer!" A car backfires. Someone's ball hits a tree nearby. A bird squawks. A frog croaks. My caddie sneezes. Someone's bag falls over. Etc. etc. etc.

 

Someone new to the game made a great shot and his family celebrated. I've got a daughter. She knows to be respectful and quiet and appropriate on the golf course, but if she ever makes a hole-in-one or something else great, I'm going to be a proud dad at that point and it may or may not involve yelling a bit.

 

BTW, I'd play it where it lies. Bad luck. Oh well.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

I can't believe that you all believe that this is proper behavior on the course. If that is the case, then you are part of the problem with the erosion of etiquette in today's players. It's okay to do these things as long as you're having fun, regardless of the fact that your version of fun may detract from the next group's idea of what makes for a pleasant round.  I guess that it's also okay to not bother with repairing your pitch marks, since that isn't really any fun either.

 

Straw man much?

 

Geez. The ancient one has spoken: we're not allowed to spontaneously react like human beings on the golf course. Respect requires perfection. Otherwise we're just part of that "young generation of jerky kids."

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

Crowd noise at a professional tournament is a completely different animal. It's an expected and unavoidable situation, 

 

Like a father whooping in joy and sharing one of those moments in his life and the life of his child that they'll remember as long as they live?

 

Darnit! The bastards!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

Maybe you need to show me just what it is that entitles you to act in a way that diminishes my round.  A quiet murmur of conversation 300 yards away is very different from someone letting out a scream 100 feet from you in the middle of your backswing.  I don't see a tell of joy as being any different from hollering an expletive when something bad happens.  both at equally improper.

 

Maybe the player 100 feet away should have, as you noted they do on the PGA Tour, waited until they were free to hit.

 

I do it. If someone's putting or teeing off nearby, I wait.

 

Sorry Rick, you're off base on this one IMO. I'm as much for observing the rules of etiquette as anyone, but this one doesn't even approach the line. It's not a habit, it's not something they're doing regularly. It was a spontaneous reaction to a great moment in the family's lives. I thought you'd moved to Bermuda or something, not the top of Mount Crumpit.

post #22 of 74

I was going to ask was the name of the crusty guy yelling at the OP named shorty or fourputt by chance?

post #23 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

Maybe you need to show me just what it is that entitles you to act in a way that diminishes my round.  A quiet murmur of conversation 300 yards away is very different from someone letting out a scream 100 feet from you in the middle of your backswing.  I don't see a tell of joy as being any different from hollering an expletive when something bad happens.  both at equally improper.

 

Maybe the player 100 feet away should have, as you noted they do on the PGA Tour, waited until they were free to hit.

 

I do it. If someone's putting or teeing off nearby, I wait.

 

Sorry Rick, you're off base on this one IMO. I'm as much for observing the rules of etiquette as anyone, but this one doesn't even approach the line. It's not a habit, it's not something they're doing regularly. It was a spontaneous reaction to a great moment in the family's lives. I thought you'd moved to Bermuda or something, not the top of Mount Crumpit.

 

And of course you aren't over the top with your counterreaction.  You didn't address my final paragraph.  I'm not as rigid about this occurrence as I am about those who think that it's proper behavior.  My main point was, and has always been that the kid who did it should still be told that it's more correct to try and restrain such outbursts.  And the family doesn't need to be screaming along with him... they didn't do anything special.

post #24 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

And of course you aren't over the top with your counterreaction.

 

Nope. Just because I disagree with you doesn't mean I'm "over the top." My reaction seems to be right inline with almost everyone else's.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

You didn't address my final paragraph.

 

I feel I did. But here goes again:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

Maybe you need to show me just what it is that entitles you to act in a way that diminishes my round.  A quiet murmur of conversation 300 yards away is very different from someone letting out a scream 100 feet from you in the middle of your backswing.  I don't see a tell of joy as being any different from hollering an expletive when something bad happens.  both at equally improper.

 

If your world is so petty that your round is "diminished" by the spontaneous joy of a family on the golf course, and you rate that with "hollering an expletive," then I think that says quite a bit about you, and very little of it is positive.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

I'm not as rigid about this occurrence as I am about those who think that it's proper behavior. 

 

Nobody's saying you get to run around screaming all the time. But this situation ain't that.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

My main point was, and has always been that the kid who did it should still be told that it's more correct to try and restrain such outbursts.  And the family doesn't need to be screaming along with him... they didn't do anything special.

 

Yeah, that's awesome.</sarcasm>

 

Shut up kid. Don't express spontaneous joy the way humans have done so for thousands of years. This is GOLF for crying out loud. There's no screaming in golf! There's no JOY! This is a CHORE! Respect the old dudes over there who are playing their usual $1 nassau, because they've clearly confused this with the final round of the U.S. Open, and chose to hit while someone was putting nearby.

 

Geez, Rick, go back to bed and wake up on the other side, please.

post #25 of 74

Wow.

 

Trying to keep things in the context of what happened with the OP.  The events were unfortunate for the guys teeing off. I don't think yelling at the family was correct.

 

I wouldn't want to stifle the families excitement for their son making a putt.  On the contrary, I think that was important for the young guy.

 

And we wonder why we are having trouble growing the game.  B-)

post #26 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dormie1360 View Post

 

And we wonder why we are having trouble growing the game.  B-)

Bingo, this is the biggest point right here!

post #27 of 74

Wow! Hard to believe there are people that would get mad over an outburst over a made putt.

 

You guys would absolutely hate playing in our Saturday games around here. I can usually tell where the other teams stand by the noise coming from a green after an eagle or a birdie. An eagle has a different sound than a birdie and if there is only silence it means the best they had was a par.

 

P.S. If somebody gets a hole in one or a double eagle we can literally hear it on the other side of the course.

post #28 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 
 

 

 I thought you'd moved to Bermuda or something, not the top of Mount Crumpit.

Mount Crumpit…lmao. :-$

 

@Fourputt , I don't think anyone is arguing that it's ok to run around the course hootin' and hollerin' but, c'mon man, were talking about a young kid getting his first birdie. Hell, I'm 40 and I am still known to get a little over-excited when I sink a (rare) birdie. I don't holler, just a fist pump or something but I'm 40 and hollering is exhausting. If I ever get my kids into the game you can bet your ass I'll be making a big deal out of their first birdie. With all the hand-wringing going on over the decline of the game and widespread closures of courses you'd think the self-proclaimed stewards of the game would be a little more encouraging when it come's to new players especially when they are kids with unknown potential.

post #29 of 74

Quote:

Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

If your world is so petty that your round is "diminished" by the spontaneous joy of a family on the golf course, and you rate that with "hollering an expletive," then I think that says quite a bit about you, and very little of it is positive.

 

Unless the yelling is occurring quite frequently, I actually think it is nice to see someone excited on the course.  Happiness/Joy can be quite "catching".

post #30 of 74

Talk about everything being blown way out of proportion (and yes I contributed to it, and for that I am sorry :surrender: ).

 

My points:

 

1)  The over loud exclamation by the youngster is excusable under the circumstances.

2)  The adults in the group should have the self discipline to show some restraint

3)  The guys on the tee box were out of line with their over-reaction - no way I'd have been trying to browbeat the happy family, even if I was disturbed by the noise (unlikely, as my game is almost never bothered by anything like that)

4)  Once things have calmed down, the kid should still be taught that neither his exclamation nor the other guys' outburst were proper behavior and should be avoided when possible.

 

Unlike some I've known, I'm not one who feels that kids should be barred from anything more than a par 3 course.  I enjoy playing golf with young people.  I enjoy helping them to learn the same love for the game that I enjoy.  I enjoy introducing them to the rules of golf and the rules of etiquette.  I am not the Big Bad Wolf.

 

'Nuff said about that!  Now I'm done.   

post #31 of 74

There is a big difference between a group getting  a little loud because someone in their group did something cool (first birdie, chip in, scored with the cart girl), and someone who hits a crap tee shot and screams out F**k!!.  When I hear the excited kind of cheering I always look over to see what great thing happened so I can enjoy it too.  

post #32 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fourputt View Post
 

1)  The over loud exclamation by the youngster is excusable under the circumstances.

2)  The adults in the group should have the self discipline to show some restraint

3)  The guys on the tee box were out of line with their over-reaction - no way I'd have been trying to browbeat the happy family, even if I was disturbed by the noise (unlikely, as my game is almost never bothered by anything like that)

4)  Once things have calmed down, the kid should still be taught that neither his exclamation nor the other guys' outburst were proper behavior and should be avoided when possible.

 

I disagree with the bold.

 

It was literally a once-in-a-lifetime event (as all "firsts" are).

post #33 of 74

Last time I played the 18-hole par 3 Heartwell golf course in Long Beach (Tiger grew up playing there), I was paired with a father and 12 year old son. First time ever playing for the son, and the dad was literally taking pics of every "first." First hole, swing, chip, putt, bogie, green, bunker shot, hot dog, etc etc etc. They cheered when he hit his first green. Nobody cared, including me, and rightfully so. This is a game right? So tired of these good ol boys who think they are trying out for the senior's Depends Tour, and want the golf course to be a funeral march. Even PGA tour players can hear cheers from other holes at times, right?

post #34 of 74

OK, the Mount Crumpit line did make my day. :-D

 

I agree with most here that since it was an unusual occurrence, the OP and family were not in the wrong.  It should not happen all the time and young players need to be taught all the proper etiquette.  The apology was the adult and gentlemanly thing to do on your part.  I think this taught more to your son than anything else @RightEdge

 

The Screamer was definitely over the line.  Unfortunately, these types are on every golf course.  It would have been comical if the Screamer had disrupted another player who screamed and started a chain reaction around the course like the dog barking chain in 101 Dalmatians.

post #35 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by flopster View Post
 

Well ...........................do we send smoke signals saying  FORE when a ball is flying at someones head? I just have one thing to say to people who get all uptight over some noise that is not meant to disturb them but they somehow feel they have the right to tell others to quiet down, get that stick out of your ass. I can't believe it when people think the whole course needs to be dead silent when they are over the ball like that makes some kind of difference. I'm on board if it's a bunch of drunk loud mouths who think just because they paid that they can act however they please but normal noise happens. I will say this though I'm a bit spoiled where I play the course is in the middle of nowhere with just the one road to the clubhouse and no roads or houses within 5 miles, you can hear the group behind talking when your on the green and they are on the tee of a par 5 sometimes.

 

Wow good example about sending a smoke signal......... NOT  So when is it ok to yell in a library?   The answer is when there is danger like a fire.  So if a golf ball is hit errantly aka the danger, it is ok to yell.  :doh:

post #36 of 74
Quote:
Originally Posted by ay33660 View Post
 

Holly shit I wouldn't want to run into guys like you on a golf course.

 

Celebrating a long birdie putt is being disrespectful.

 

Give me a break.

Where in my post did i say we celebrated birdies? I said hole in one. Too me if my group got a birdie we would act liked we've been there and move onto the next hole. but a hole in one, i dont know anyone who wouldnt celebrate...

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