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Operation "Rest my Muscles", a diary of the recovery process to get my swing back.

post #1 of 32
Thread Starter 

Here I am stuck in my study, not able to really play. Unfortunately, I let myself get too excited about the improvements I had made in the past 4 months to give myself any rest.

 

This happened before, but since I was using the wrong muscle group it led to true injuries. This time it's just that jelly feeling and weakness from muscle fatigue, which started about 4 weeks ago, but ignored it because there were exciting golf things going on at the time.

 

I am hoping that by documenting the recovery process, it will prevent me from doing this again.

 

Bad things happen when a person continues to try to perform the same things with over-worked muscles. Here are the bad things:

  1. Excitement: Learning to swing correctly is a really rewarding process. You feel on top of the world
  2. Losing distance: Didn't really matter because I could recover from this with clubbing up.
  3. Losing accuracy: Okay, this cost me a few strokes
  4. Bad Shots: Getting worse, but it still does not stop me from playing
  5. Bad Swing: This is the final stage, where everything falls apart. Just could not swing to save my life.

 

Stopped: after one day of "stopping", I couldn't even really get into the golf setup without feeling some pain.

Day "stopped" 1: Couldn't drive far, and started to compensate for it using the wrong muscle set

Day "stopped" 2: Tried "experiments" with different clubs, and the warmed up muscles gave me a false sense of recovery

Day "stopped" 3: Hit like crap because my muscled rebelled against the fatigue.

Day "stopped" 4: Stopped for real because it felt too painful and "rubbery"

Day "stopped" 5: Had a lesson to "re-learn" ho to swing, but still hit really wimpy

 

The only good thing about learning to swing properly is that I am not technically "injured".

 

The plan is to show a day by day recovery process, and record how long it actually takes to recover from this fatigue. The plan is to hit a few balls on the range (buy a small bucket, and abandon if needed), and see how many days it takes to recovery. The most interesting thing is to find out the recovery stages, and which parts of my game improve first and the order of the other recovered attributes. My initial guess is that I need to lay off golf for at least a couple weeks to fully recover, but I can ease my way back by hitting chips to full swings slowly.

 

This is Day 6. I'll record the results tonight.

post #2 of 32
Thread Starter 

Day 6, went to look at harps during the kids practice. Lifted two concert grand harps. Carried a carpet for the harpist. No issues with any muscles.

 

I went to hit a few balls at half speed (PW to 9i), no issues. Started to sweat from pain as I got into the 7i and heavier. Driver still felt wimpy.

 

My PW at a comfortable swing speed is now up from 98 yards to about 110 or so with the MP33 KBS Tour X-Stiff. I used them during the lesson yesterday and averaging about 100 yards peaking out at 108 or more.

 

Still need more rest, guessing 2 days to full performance, but who really knows.

 

I am drinking little bit of Yerba Mate for the extra caffeine to stimulate the muscles.

post #3 of 32
Please don't take this the wrong way, but STOP SWINGING A GOLF CLUB!

I know you have a pretty extensive hitting routine, and I can't help but think it may be catching up to you. If you are really suffering from some sort of muscular fatigue, the only way to get better is to get some rest.

I mean this in the most sincere way possible, but please, get some rest. Take some time away from golf so that you can heal, so that you don't hurt yourself, and so that you aren't hurting your golf game.

Also, swinging at half speed does not qualify as rest. Put the clubs down, man, and kick up your feet. Take it easy for a bit so that you can get back to 100%, then ease your way back into golf.
post #4 of 32

I'm a little confused with this thread...  I've gone through periods of my life where I've practiced a bunch, but have never had the complete body muscle fatigue that you are describing.  Like many of us, I yo-yo with my exercising habits....  I'll be very disciplined in treadmill and weight training for 4 months, go on a 4 month hiatus, then pick it back up.  When I pick it back up, my muscles are fatigued, but after a week or so, they adjust and I feel much more energetic.  In terms of golf practice, the one thing that I have to watch for is my left shoulder.  If I put in too much practice, my left shoulder may flare up and it'll be an issue that I'll have to deal with by curtailing my practice a little (along with treating it with ice and heat).

 

How many golf balls are you hitting in a day to wear your body down like this?   Are you involved in other physical activity that would contribute to this full body muscle fatigue?  Are you getting enough sleep?  Do you eat right and hydrate yourself?

 

I'm not trying to downplay what you are feeling, I'm just struggling to understand.

post #5 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post

Please don't take this the wrong way, but STOP SWINGING A GOLF CLUB!

I know you have a pretty extensive hitting routine, and I can't help but think it may be catching up to you. If you are really suffering from some sort of muscular fatigue, the only way to get better is to get some rest.

I mean this in the most sincere way possible, but please, get some rest. Take some time away from golf so that you can heal, so that you don't hurt yourself, and so that you aren't hurting your golf game.

Also, swinging at half speed does not qualify as rest. Put the clubs down, man, and kick up your feet. Take it easy for a bit so that you can get back to 100%, then ease your way back into golf.

 

Good point, I am planning to rest this entire week. I think some yoga will be perfect to help burn some calories.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by boil3rmak3r View Post
 

I'm a little confused with this thread...  I've gone through periods of my life where I've practiced a bunch, but have never had the complete body muscle fatigue that you are describing.  Like many of us, I yo-yo with my exercising habits....  I'll be very disciplined in treadmill and weight training for 4 months, go on a 4 month hiatus, then pick it back up.  When I pick it back up, my muscles are fatigued, but after a week or so, they adjust and I feel much more energetic.  In terms of golf practice, the one thing that I have to watch for is my left shoulder.  If I put in too much practice, my left shoulder may flare up and it'll be an issue that I'll have to deal with by curtailing my practice a little (along with treating it with ice and heat).

 

How many golf balls are you hitting in a day to wear your body down like this?   Are you involved in other physical activity that would contribute to this full body muscle fatigue?  Are you getting enough sleep?  Do you eat right and hydrate yourself?

 

I'm not trying to downplay what you are feeling, I'm just struggling to understand.

 

I'd like to start out with the fact that I also used to get that shoulder flare up. Now that I am using more of a better swing, it's just my enire body.

 

The parts that are getting sore are the torso muscles near the hip, the quads, the intercostal muscles and finally my latissimus dorsi.

 

When I swing, it feels really weak.

 

I was hitting only about 200 balls per day, but I was driving more than 80 balls. When I get back on track again, I am going to drop it to PW to 8i into the net 80-100 per day and 2 days a week all clubs 120 balls. Every day, I plan on about 50 half swing pitch shots. And yoga to stretch and build strength. Possibly pilates on the core muscles in the back and the lower abdominal to prevent lower back injuries. Thankfully, I have not had any, but heard some nightmares about them.

post #6 of 32

Ha, you should have my back problems...j/k  Try this if you haven't already, it helped me a bunch, as in I can go to the range, hit 200 or more balls, and Not be in sever pain. First, I only hit balls every other day, sometime less.

 

Second and most importantly SLOW your swing down to 50% or less for say 70 to 85% of the balls you hit, and you'd be surprised at how far the short irons go swinging slower, for example, I can easily hit my PW (47*) 100 yards with little more than a slow 1/2 swing, due the good contact, and I can sync up better making slower swings, although I still haven't duplicated my 150+ yd 9i I hit a couple months ago..

 

Also, how's your diet..? Eating better can help with recovery.Lastly lots of Stretching, this really helps me more than anything, especially my balance on full swings. give a try, ya got nothing to lose..:-D 

 

BTW, I hit 200 balls tonight at the range, had my best session yet, and I feel pretty good, very slight back pain, but much less than even a month ago.

post #7 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer 4 View Post
 

Ha, you should have my back problems...j/k  Try this if you haven't already, it helped me a bunch, as in I can go to the range, hit 200 or more balls, and Not be in sever pain. First, I only hit balls every other day, sometime less.

 

Second and most importantly SLOW your swing down to 50% or less for say 70 to 85% of the balls you hit, and you'd be surprised at how far the short irons go swinging slower, for example, I can easily hit my PW (47*) 100 yards with little more than a slow 1/2 swing, due the good contact, and I can sync up better making slower swings, although I still haven't duplicated my 150+ yd 9i I hit a couple months ago..

 

Also, how's your diet..? Eating better can help with recovery.Lastly lots of Stretching, this really helps me more than anything, especially my balance on full swings. give a try, ya got nothing to lose..:-D 

 

BTW, I hit 200 balls tonight at the range, had my best session yet, and I feel pretty good, very slight back pain, but much less than even a month ago.

 

That's good to hear.

 

Yes, I swing pretty slowly now. Well in control, so that most of my shots are much tighter grouped.

post #8 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

I was hitting only about 200 balls per day ...
This reminds me of the silly old joke: "Hey doctor, it hurts when I do this." "Well, don't do that."

Why not just cut back to 50 balls a day or 100 balls every other day, or something like that? Seems like a pretty simple solution to me. ;). ( FYI, I have back issues and I hit about 150 or so balls per WEEK.)
post #9 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

I was hitting only about 200 balls per day ...
This reminds me of the silly old joke: "Hey doctor, it hurts when I do this." "Well, don't do that."

Why not just cut back to 50 balls a day or 100 balls every other day, or something like that? Seems like a pretty simple solution to me. ;). ( FYI, I have back issues and I hit about 150 or so balls per WEEK.)

:-$

post #10 of 32
Thread Starter 

BTW, the reason why this is an "operation" is simply because reducing my golfing is kind of hard. . .

 

I might just be a little too obsessed?

post #11 of 32

@Lihu I'm glad you started this thread...very interesting and I'm looking forward to seeing how your energy comes back.

 

I definitely think rest is important, and over-training a golf swing can do more harm than good (like any sport or physical activity). I also completely relate to your desire/obsession to hit balls every day. When you learn the proper way to strike a golf ball it is beyond addicting. For guys like you and I who have only figured this out fairly recently, it seems like a fleeting thing. Like if we don't ingrain this motion every free minute we get, that it will somehow leave us. I don't think this is true. I've suffered a little of the severe fatigue you're experiencing. Due to an extraordinarily busy couple of weeks at work, and the rains we got in SoCal last weekend, I only made it to the range twice in 2 weeks, with no rounds in between (a blessing in disguise). I did a little mirror work at home, but nothing major. 10min a night, maybe 3-4 nights in the 2 weeks. Putted a little indoors. I played yesterday and didn't really know what to expect...just trusted my swing and kept my thoughts simple. Shot an 85, 7 shots lower than I've ever shot at this particular course. Sometimes it takes more discipline to NOT practice.

post #12 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post


I might just be a little too obsessed?

Then you're in the right place. f3_laugh.gif
post #13 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by BENtSwing32 View Post
 

@Lihu I'm glad you started this thread...very interesting and I'm looking forward to seeing how your energy comes back.

 

I definitely think rest is important, and over-training a golf swing can do more harm than good (like any sport or physical activity). I also completely relate to your desire/obsession to hit balls every day. When you learn the proper way to strike a golf ball it is beyond addicting. For guys like you and I who have only figured this out fairly recently, it seems like a fleeting thing. Like if we don't ingrain this motion every free minute we get, that it will somehow leave us. I don't think this is true. I've suffered a little of the severe fatigue you're experiencing. Due to an extraordinarily busy couple of weeks at work, and the rains we got in SoCal last weekend, I only made it to the range twice in 2 weeks, with no rounds in between (a blessing in disguise). I did a little mirror work at home, but nothing major. 10min a night, maybe 3-4 nights in the 2 weeks. Putted a little indoors. I played yesterday and didn't really know what to expect...just trusted my swing and kept my thoughts simple. Shot an 85, 7 shots lower than I've ever shot at this particular course. Sometimes it takes more discipline to NOT practice.

 

 

Good for you, and congratz on your 85. Mind if I ask which course..?  Practicing the correct way, I think is key. It's not necessarily how much, but making the most of when you do practice. 

post #14 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer 4 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BENtSwing32 View Post
 

@Lihu I'm glad you started this thread...very interesting and I'm looking forward to seeing how your energy comes back.

 

I definitely think rest is important, and over-training a golf swing can do more harm than good (like any sport or physical activity). I also completely relate to your desire/obsession to hit balls every day. When you learn the proper way to strike a golf ball it is beyond addicting. For guys like you and I who have only figured this out fairly recently, it seems like a fleeting thing. Like if we don't ingrain this motion every free minute we get, that it will somehow leave us. I don't think this is true. I've suffered a little of the severe fatigue you're experiencing. Due to an extraordinarily busy couple of weeks at work, and the rains we got in SoCal last weekend, I only made it to the range twice in 2 weeks, with no rounds in between (a blessing in disguise). I did a little mirror work at home, but nothing major. 10min a night, maybe 3-4 nights in the 2 weeks. Putted a little indoors. I played yesterday and didn't really know what to expect...just trusted my swing and kept my thoughts simple. Shot an 85, 7 shots lower than I've ever shot at this particular course. Sometimes it takes more discipline to NOT practice.

 

 

Good for you, and congratz on your 85. Mind if I ask which course..?  Practicing the correct way, I think is key. It's not necessarily how much, but making the most of when you do practice. 

 

Agreed, and thanks for the support you two.

 

@BENtSwing32 and @Hammer 4

 

At this point, I am guessing 2 more days of only hitting a test PW. If I can get these MP33 to about 120 carry, I would feel fully recovered. On the other hand, I wouldn't feel bad with 110 to 115, either. I would just need to be able to hit the 7 iron reliably to 145. That should be enough, until I get properly fitted GI/player irons.

post #15 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by BENtSwing32 View Post

I did a little mirror work at home, but nothing major. 10min a night, maybe 3-4 nights in the 2 weeks.
This is a really good point. @Lihu, you can probably substitute some of your range work during the week with at home practice and I'd bet it would be just as effective. It would definitely save the strain on your body.

I do 90% of my practicing indoors. It's probably too high a percentage, but I find that slow motion mirror work is better for changing the picture. The added bonus is that you can do it anywhere, anytime.
post #16 of 32
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by BENtSwing32 View Post

I did a little mirror work at home, but nothing major. 10min a night, maybe 3-4 nights in the 2 weeks.
This is a really good point. @Lihu, you can probably substitute some of your range work during the week with at home practice and I'd bet it would be just as effective. It would definitely save the strain on your body.

I do 90% of my practicing indoors. It's probably too high a percentage, but I find that slow motion mirror work is better for changing the picture. The added bonus is that you can do it anywhere, anytime.

Saves $$$ too.

Now that I can swing slowly, I agree that this is the right thing to do.

Thanks for the tip.
post #17 of 32
Too much of anything is usually bad even if it is supposed to be good. There is a difference between good and healthy. If I hit 200 balls I would be fried. Typically when I practice once the goal is accomplished I stop even if that is after a few balls. Example my instructor had me working on being more consistent hitting a push draw. So I work on the drills without hitting balls before starting. When I can see that the ball flight is doing what I want I stop and either go back to drills or move on to something else, like putting. Again when goals are met I stop.
post #18 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BENtSwing32 View Post

I did a little mirror work at home, but nothing major. 10min a night, maybe 3-4 nights in the 2 weeks.
This is a really good point. @Lihu, you can probably substitute some of your range work during the week with at home practice and I'd bet it would be just as effective. It would definitely save the strain on your body.

I do 90% of my practicing indoors. It's probably too high a percentage, but I find that slow motion mirror work is better for changing the picture. The added bonus is that you can do it anywhere, anytime.

Saves $$$ too.

Now that I can swing slowly, I agree that this is the right thing to do.

Thanks for the tip.

 

Amen x 3

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