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Importance to your game in feeling rested

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Just curious. On a scale of 1 to 10 how important is it to your golf swing to be rested?

 

It never made a whole lot of difference to me and I had as hard a blue collar job as you will find anywhere (so I was always pretty much exhausted). I just showed up and played with whatever I had that day. On good days I would figure out something that would get me around the course and on bad days I didn't.

 

I would have rated the importance of being rested about a 2.

 

Now for the first time, and after working as hard as I could all winter long to change my swing mechanics, the difference between when I am rested and when I am not shows up like the difference between night and day on the course.

 

As of right now, with the changes I've made, I rate the difference in my play at a 9.

 

If I wake up in the morning after a decent night of sleep and go to the course I am striping the ball pretty well. If my boss wants to play 9 holes after I change all of the holes, fix all of the potholes in the cart paths, and dig a bunch of post holes for new signs, my lower back is tight and my swing completely falls apart and I don't seem to be able to work around it.

post #2 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by MS256 View Post
 

Just curious. On a scale of 1 to 10 how important is it to your golf swing to be rested?

 

It never made a whole lot of difference to me and I had as hard a blue collar job as you will find anywhere (so I was always pretty much exhausted). I just showed up and played with whatever I had that day. On good days I would figure out something that would get me around the course and on bad days I didn't.

 

I would have rated the importance of being rested about a 2.

 

Now for the first time, and after working as hard as I could all winter long to change my swing mechanics, the difference between when I am rested and when I am not shows up like the difference between night and day on the course.

 

As of right now, with the changes I've made, I rate the difference in my play at a 9.

 

If I wake up in the morning after a decent night of sleep and go to the course I am striping the ball pretty well. If my boss wants to play 9 holes after I change all of the holes, fix all of the potholes in the cart paths, and dig a bunch of post holes for new signs, my lower back is tight and my swing completely falls apart and I don't seem to be able to work around it.

 

 

Its pretty logical that if the back isn't feeling well that the golf swing wont be on par. I wont say feeling rested means much. I've played in golf trips were we do 27 holes a day, walking and riding, and the last day have been some of my best rounds. Wearing down doesn't bother me. Honestly first days are toughest because it might be a while since I've swung a club so those rotational muscles are tight. 

 

Like if I go to the golfsmith to test a few clubs. If I pick a driver and just start swing, the clubhead speed is a good 10mph less than after about 7-10 swings. Usually takes me that many to get the muscles stretched out. 

 

Since I am still young, as long as I get a small bucket of golf balls before a round I can get loose for a round.

 

Though I will say that if my legs are tired, my swing will suffer more than if my upper body is. Its easy to to lift a club, its tough to support your upper body weight if your thighs and gluts are tired. 

post #3 of 4
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

 

 

Its pretty logical that if the back isn't feeling well that the golf swing wont be on par. I wont say feeling rested means much. I've played in golf trips were we do 27 holes a day, walking and riding, and the last day have been some of my best rounds. Wearing down doesn't bother me. Honestly first days are toughest because it might be a while since I've swung a club so those rotational muscles are tight. 

 

Like if I go to the golfsmith to test a few clubs. If I pick a driver and just start swing, the clubhead speed is a good 10mph less than after about 7-10 swings. Usually takes me that many to get the muscles stretched out. 

 

Since I am still young, as long as I get a small bucket of golf balls before a round I can get loose for a round.

 

Though I will say that if my legs are tired, my swing will suffer more than if my upper body is. Its easy to to lift a club, its tough to support your upper body weight if your thighs and gluts are tired. 


Yeah the "rested" I'm talking about doesn't come or go from playing golf. Just from working.

 

I can play golf or hit balls pretty much all day long and never get tired and never feel like it changes my swing much, but working down at ground level for 5 hours completely changes my swing (or attempted swing).

 

I've got to figure something out because at least half of the golf I play is after work.

post #4 of 4

In my limited experience, if any of the muscles used for playing golf are "tired and sore" it leads me to make more swing flaws.

 

The more crucial muscles that are sore, the worse my performance. That's possibly due to the fact that I have only been learning a proper golf swing for the last 4 months or so.

 

For a multiple year veteran of this game, I would think he would have the experience to make very specific changes to his swing to compensate for non-functioning muscles.

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