or Connect
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › Tipping the Beer Cart girl
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tipping the Beer Cart girl - Page 21

post #361 of 378
I'm the same as most. A dollar a drink.
post #362 of 378

Yes, always.  I don't care if the course IS paying these young ladies minimum wage, service that drives right up to you is worth a decent tip.  Dolts who don't tip shouldn't be served.  Ever!

 

dave

post #363 of 378

I don't drink anything but water when I play golf, and usually only get a snack of some kind at the halfway house (where I tip generously). The only time I see a "beer cart girl" is at outings or resort courses anyway and I usually feel obligated to give them something, even though all I might get is water (which is liberally placed for free around most golf courses I play).

post #364 of 378

post #365 of 378

I met my girlfriend on the golf course... she was the beer girl. She gets tipped regularly. :w00t:

post #366 of 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Foursum Golf View Post

I met my girlfriend on the golf course... she was the beer girl. She gets tipped regularly. d4_w00t.gif
I'm sure she does. Giggity
post #367 of 378

Never played a course with a "beer cart" and a halfway house is a rare thing too so have never needed to make the decision to tip or not tip.

Based on my regular visits to Philly tipping no matter what seems to be an American thing, as does *expecting* a tip for providing nothing but a regular or even sub-standard service sometimes.

I'm happy to tip anybody who provides more of a service than would be expected as standard but for someone to get annoyed because I didn't tip them (after they greeted with me with just a nod, didn't ask what I wanted; just waited for me to order, said nothing at all to me when dropping my order off, has never checked if my order was ok and hasn't so much as offered a smile every time I've interacted with them) is just ridiculous.

post #368 of 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by MiniBlueDragon View Post

Never played a course with a "beer cart" and a halfway house is a rare thing too so have never needed to make the decision to tip or not tip.



Based on my regular visits to Philly tipping no matter what seems to be an American thing, as does *expecting* a tip for providing nothing but a regular or even sub-standard service sometimes.



I'm happy to tip anybody who provides more of a service than would be expected as standard but for someone to get annoyed because I didn't tip them (after they greeted with me with just a nod, didn't ask what I wanted; just waited for me to order, said nothing at all to me when dropping my order off, has never checked if my order was ok and hasn't so much as offered a smile every time I've interacted with them) is just ridiculous.


 



It's ridiculous when, as is the case in most other countries, the service-providing employee is being paid something in the vicinity of a living wage and tips are typically small and/or optional, generally reserved for only above-average service. However, in the US, even very mediocre, average service deserves a tip because the price of the food, drinks, etc... does not include the employee's full wages and it is understood that the customer must factor in an appropriate tip into the cost of what is being purchased. If the service provider is doing such a disinterested job that it becomes bad service, well, then one can tip a very small amount or no tip at all, as it is indeed ridiculous to pay someone for service when that service is outright bad and deficient. However, if the service is simply OK, then tip 15%. This should not be a surprise for any foreign visitors to the U.S. - there are dozens of travel websites and travel books out there that very clearly discuss the tipping system in each country and how much to tip for Americans traveling outside of the US, so I am sure that there must be an equal number of sources out there for information on tipping available to those from other countries visiting the U.S. I have a hard time believing that any somewhat sophisticated foreign tourist to the US who doesn't tip is doing it out of innocent ignorance - I think our system should be sufficiently well-known and clear that most foreigners who aren't tipping are being cheapskates, not out of lack of knowledge.
post #369 of 378

Your in America.
post #370 of 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisguy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MiniBlueDragon View Post
 

Never played a course with a "beer cart" and a halfway house is a rare thing too so have never needed to make the decision to tip or not tip.



Based on my regular visits to Philly tipping no matter what seems to be an American thing, as does *expecting* a tip for providing nothing but a regular or even sub-standard service sometimes.



I'm happy to tip anybody who provides more of a service than would be expected as standard but for someone to get annoyed because I didn't tip them (after they greeted with me with just a nod, didn't ask what I wanted; just waited for me to order, said nothing at all to me when dropping my order off, has never checked if my order was ok and hasn't so much as offered a smile every time I've interacted with them) is just ridiculous.

 

It's ridiculous when, as is the case in most other countries, the service-providing employee is being paid something in the vicinity of a living wage and tips are typically small and/or optional, generally reserved for only above-average service.

 

However, in the US, even very mediocre, average service deserves a tip because the price of the food, drinks, etc... does not include the employee's full wages and it is understood that the customer must factor in an appropriate tip into the cost of what is being purchased.

 

If the service provider is doing such a disinterested job that it becomes bad service, well, then one can tip a very small amount or no tip at all, as it is indeed ridiculous to pay someone for service when that service is outright bad and deficient. However, if the service is simply OK, then tip 15%.

 

This should not be a surprise for any foreign visitors to the U.S. - there are dozens of travel websites and travel books out there that very clearly discuss the tipping system in each country and how much to tip for Americans traveling outside of the US, so I am sure that there must be an equal number of sources out there for information on tipping available to those from other countries visiting the U.S. I have a hard time believing that any somewhat sophisticated foreign tourist to the US who doesn't tip is doing it out of innocent ignorance - I think our system should be sufficiently well-known and clear that most foreigners who aren't tipping are being cheapskates, not out of lack of knowledge.


I never once said I didn't know about the "must tip" clause of visiting any type of food outlet in the US and indeed it's well documented. As I also said I tip whenever I feel the tip is justified (I tip the pizza delivery guy come rain or shine as they're always friendly, polite and I know they get paid a minimum wage. Likewise I tip my server in a restaurant providing they've been friendly and actually bothered asking how the food is and if there's anything else they can do)

What I can't abide is people who clearly hate their job, who ignore you when you enter an establishment until they've finished their conversation, who don't say hello or ask how you're doing, who say not a single word when the food is brought up, who don't ask mid-meal if everything's fine or anything else I'd class as not providing an adequate service and then they expect a tip for it too.

Here's a tip; cheer your face up and give a shit about the customer and you might get a small amount of extra money as a thank you for caring. Standing in the corner chatting to your friend while the restaurant's empty and our table's been out of drinks for half an hour doesn't deserve a single penny. That's not me being a cheapskate it's me letting you know that you're not doing your job to an OK level and you need to sort it out.

post #371 of 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by MiniBlueDragon View Post


I never once said I didn't know about the "must tip" clause of visiting any type of food outlet in the US and indeed it's well documented. As I also said I tip whenever I feel the tip is justified (I tip the pizza delivery guy come rain or shine as they're always friendly, polite and I know they get paid a minimum wage. Likewise I tip my server in a restaurant providing they've been friendly and actually bothered asking how the food is and if there's anything else they can do)


What I can't abide is people who clearly hate their job, who ignore you when you enter an establishment until they've finished their conversation, who don't say hello or ask how you're doing, who say not a single word when the food is brought up, who don't ask mid-meal if everything's fine or anything else I'd class as not providing an adequate service and then they expect a tip for it too.


Here's a tip; cheer your face up and give a shit about the customer and you might get a small amount of extra money as a thank you for caring. Standing in the corner chatting to your friend while the restaurant's empty and our table's been out of drinks for half an hour doesn't deserve a single penny. That's not me being a cheapskate it's me letting you know that you're not doing your job to an OK level and you need to sort it out.
I don't know where you are but I almost never encounter the attitude your describing above. I get great courtesy and service almost always.
post #372 of 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jakester23 View Post
 
I don't know where you are but I almost never encounter the attitude your describing above. I get great courtesy and service almost always.


I generally agree; it's the times when I don't but it's still "expected" that get me irate.

Last year we had a work trip to Philly and stayed in the Crowne Plaza Philadelphia West. We went into TGI Friday one evening for food and got ignored at the front desk despite frequent smiles at staff wandering around to suggest we'd like to be served. 10 minutes later we finally got seated with no offer of "can I get you some drinks while you look at the menu?".

 

20 minutes later still nobody to take the orders so we had to go and find someone to ask them to come to the table for us to order. The drinks menu had no prices on and when it was enquired as to why the answer was "I can tell you prices". One of the meals came up wrong and the others were luke warm. Nobody asked how the food was at any point (wonder why!). We had to find a staff member once again to be able to order more drinks and also to pay the bill.

We put the cash down for the bill and there was about $4 left over once the bill was paid and the cheeky bloody server looked at the cash and the bill and then told us it "wasn't enough of a tip".

Granted that's been one of the only truly bad services I've had during yearly 5 day visits to Philly but it's still an example of how there are occasions when expecting a tip is just not on...

post #373 of 378
I can be nearly as direct in real life as I am on an internet forum. Over the past two years, I've probably asked for a manager at a restaurant five or six times, once to complain about a really bad, inattentive server, the other times to compliment really attentive, excellent servers. Decent, even excellent servers outnumber crappy ones by a significant margin at the restaurants where I eat, but sometimes one can get bad service and the customer can be completely blameless. About 3 years ago, I had horrible service twice in few months, once at a high end national steak house where I got a bad, tasteless steak, the server was really snide to us even though we were dressed better than the average customer there and were doing nothing to deserve his attitude, and we had two 30+ minute periods where the server ignored us, including immediately after dropping a $45 piece of sub-Choice stew meat masquerading as a USDA Prime ribeye off for my entree. The second time was at a Mexican restaurant, the server was rude, it took 4 requests and 20 minutes to get a drink delivered to our table and on her way there, she stopped to shovel some garbage off the floor with her hands, pushed it down into a trashcan, and then grabbed our drink by the glass's rims without stopping to wash her hands. Neither server got a tip and the latter one got immediately replaced after the garbage incident when I demanded a manager and a new server. Those are examples of really bad service. It should be obvious what constitutes bad service and it should be obvious that someone who depends on 75+% of his or her income originating in gratuities should not provide bad service, but some people don't understand that.

Being a server can be a lot more difficult work mentally and physically than a person who has never worked in a restaurant can appreciate. I'm more than two decades past my experiences working in a restaurant, but I don't forget what it is like to be a server on a Friday night when the line for tables is out the door. I'm not such a Marie Antoinette to assume that everyone can have their dream jobs. One can hate one's current occupation but still do a reasonable job at it.

Not giving you a smile is not bad service. If a server takes the time to discuss a menu choice with me and steers me in a very good direction, that is terrific service worthy of over a 20% tip, but generally speaking, I don't need or want a server to be my new BFF. If a server keeps a straight face, but is attentive, polite and provides you with everything you need promptly, you'd be a total dick and a cheapskate even to consider giving him or her less than a 15% tip, let alone no tip, just because he or she didn't smile at you and get all cheery-cheery with you. Your comment "get a small amount of extra money as a thank you for caring" implies that you are tipping under 15% for acceptable service. That is an inadequate tip in this country. If you don't have the money or class to tip adequately and appropriately (15% for average, reasonable service, 20% or more for very good service), you should stick to fast food restaurants where you don't need to tip.

EDIT: Now your TGI Fridays incident in the previous post was an example of legitimately bad service deserving much less than a 15% tip. I'd have called for a manager. If a server ever told me a tip was inadequate, I'd have fixed that by taking back the entire tip. I did that only once in the time I was a server, it was after a cheapskate teenager didn't tip me because I carded his 17 year-old butt and wouldn't serve him alcohol, and it was my very last night working as a waiter, so I wasn't worried about losing my job (which is appropriate for a server who complains about a tip under normal circumstances).
post #374 of 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisguy View Post

I can be nearly as direct in real life as I am on an internet forum. Over the past two years, I've probably asked for a manager at a restaurant five or six times, once to complain about a really bad, inattentive server, the other times to compliment really attentive, excellent servers. Decent, even excellent servers outnumber crappy ones by a significant margin at the restaurants where I eat, but sometimes one can get bad service and the customer can be completely blameless. About 3 years ago, I had horrible service twice in few months, once at a high end national steak house where I got a bad, tasteless steak, the server was really snide to us even though we were dressed better than the average customer there and were doing nothing to deserve his attitude, and we had two 30+ minute periods where the server ignored us, including immediately after dropping a $45 piece of sub-Choice stew meat masquerading as a USDA Prime ribeye off for my entree. The second time was at a Mexican restaurant, the server was rude, it took 4 requests and 20 minutes to get a drink delivered to our table and on her way there, she stopped to shovel some garbage off the floor with her hands, pushed it down into a trashcan, and then grabbed our drink by the glass's rims without stopping to wash her hands. Neither server got a tip and the latter one got immediately replaced after the garbage incident when I demanded a manager and a new server. Those are examples of really bad service. It should be obvious what constitutes bad service and it should be obvious that someone who depends on 75+% of his or her income originating in gratuities should not provide bad service, but some people don't understand that.

Being a server can be a lot more difficult work mentally and physically than a person who has never worked in a restaurant can appreciate. I'm more than two decades past my experiences working in a restaurant, but I don't forget what it is like to be a server on a Friday night when the line for tables is out the door. I'm not such a Marie Antoinette to assume that everyone can have their dream jobs. One can hate one's current occupation but still do a reasonable job at it.

Not giving you a smile is not bad service. If a server takes the time to discuss a menu choice with me and steers me in a very good direction, that is terrific service worthy of over a 20% tip, but generally speaking, I don't need or want a server to be my new BFF. If a server keeps a straight face, but is attentive, polite and provides you with everything you need promptly, you'd be a total dick and a cheapskate even to consider giving him or her less than a 15% tip, let alone no tip, just because he or she didn't smile at you and get all cheery-cheery with you. Your comment "get a small amount of extra money as a thank you for caring" implies that you are tipping under 15% for acceptable service. That is an inadequate tip in this country. If you don't have the money or class to tip adequately and appropriately (15% for average, reasonable service, 20% or more for very good service), you should stick to fast food restaurants where you don't need to tip.

EDIT: Now your TGI Fridays incident in the previous post was an example of legitimately bad service deserving much less than a 15% tip. I'd have called for a manager. If a server ever told me a tip was inadequate, I'd have fixed that by taking back the entire tip. I did that only once in the time I was a server, it was after a cheapskate teenager didn't tip me because I carded his 17 year-old butt and wouldn't serve him alcohol, and it was my very last night working as a waiter, so I wasn't worried about losing my job (which is appropriate for a server who complains about a tip under normal circumstances).


Not quite sure how you came to that conclusion but it's absolutely untrue and your subsequent comments are bordering on insulting.

During work visits to Philly (the only place in the US I've been and go yearly) everything is covered by the company credit card I have and that includes all tips. It takes something truly wrong like in the TGI example above for me to not tip the expected 15% (often it's higher as I'd rather use the full meal allowance and give extra to the server than spend the money on food I don't actually want. e.g. bill comes in at $40 but I have a meal allowance of $50 so the server gets $10 tip.).

The whole crux of my argument is solely than "expecting" a 15% tip no matter what service has been provided is just strange. Do you tip your garbage men 15% every time they collect your rubbish? Or do you tip the bus driver 15% because of the service he's providing? Or the shop assistant who goes out the back of the shop to find a certain size of garment? Surely they're all on reasonably comparable wages so they should all be tipped too irrelevant of what level of service they've supplied?

post #375 of 378

Tip her big early and get great service all day!  Same for going to the 19th hole. Amazing what a big tip will do, especially when you are or want to become a regular. 

post #376 of 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by BombTechGolf View Post
 

Tip her big early and get great service all day!  Same for going to the 19th hole. Amazing what a big tip will do, especially when you are or want to become a regular. 

That's my rule of thumb any time I'm getting drinks from someone! I have always been a big tipper in bars and pubs and the end result is I usually come out way ahead. My current favorite pub has my beer poured and ready before I even sit down and most of the staff buys me drinks regularly. I probably pay for less than I consume, even the owners comp me most of my shots. Also nice to know that when I come in with my wife the service is off the charts good and lets her feel like a queen.

post #377 of 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

Also nice to know that when I come in with my wife the service is off the charts good and lets her feel like a queen.

And when you come in with your girlfriend it's even better!! a1_smile.gif
post #378 of 378
Quote:
Originally Posted by k-troop View Post


And when you come in with your girlfriend it's even better!! a1_smile.gif

Yup, and I tip 'em enough that they keep their yaps shout about the wife...

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Golf Talk
TheSandTrap.com › Golf Forum › The Clubhouse › Golf Talk › Tipping the Beer Cart girl