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Super hacker to decent golfer..... Who's done it? - Page 6

post #91 of 122

I started out at 120+ abt a yr and a half back ... playing all 18 i break 100 but if i just play 9 i am 45+/-. 

I think my biggest issue is , i dont practise enuff leading to inconsistency ... my mind plays tricks, like the last 18 i played. one hole i was on in 2 and then had a SHAMEFUL 5 PUTT leading to abt a 15 over for the 9 and the back was 9 over

post #92 of 122

I went from somewhere in the middle a couple years ago when I played at a school to pretty much a super hacker.  I played at a fairly difficult course (Honeybrook, PA) last Saturday and had a 113 round, with multiple 3/4 putts and slicing drives.  My saving grace is my 9iron, PW, and GW were very accurate with good loft.

 

I'm hoping to regain my confidence, put in a lot of work on the putting green, and straighten out my drives.  I'm gonna put some focus on my fairway woods and long irons as well, but those two items are my priority to improve and lower my score at hopefully a fairly rapid rate

post #93 of 122
Thread Starter 
Driving the ball better lately which is helping. Not necessarily long but most are straight and in the fairway with my high loft driver. Getting out to 250-260 when I'm doing things right.

Shot a 47 on 9 holes today so I was very pleased about that. Although it's not breaking 100 on 18 it's a small victory. Trying to keep my misses with the putter small is helping. Hitting more fairways but no GIRs to really speak of. Basically getting on in GIR +1


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post #94 of 122
I went from not even wanting to play a real 18 to being able to get 8 GIR in one round the last time out.. True i will wait to do it again, but no way you get 8 GIR with out some major improvement in my opinion. So I'm not there, but think I'm getting there.
post #95 of 122
I am a bogey golfer--maybe just slightly better than bogey. If I shoot 41/82 I feel pretty good, 42/85 ok, 45/90 meh, over 45/over90 a little disgusted.

I have been playing fairly consistently for a little over 40 years. There have been a couple years when I didn't play much, one year when I think I played twice, and a few years where I played 3-4 times a week. But generally, I have played at least once a week during the season for about 40 years. Back in my late 20's early 30's, I got close to single digit, but not quite. I did not carry an official handicap then, but was shooting regularly in the low 80's with an occasional foray into the 70's or at least 30's on 9.

I was mostly self taught until college, when I decided to take some lessons. I had to unlearn some things, so there was a rebuilding process, but I have basically had the same swing ever since. I had maxed out in my self taught way and gotten to the low 90's, but after the pain of unlearning some things, the lessons and some new equipment got me into the 80's on a more regular basis.

I told you my "life story" to say that through all this I have learned what I think are some points:

1. Get a lesson or 3 from a qualified instructor, and learn the correct fundamentals. Many things may not "feel natural" at first, but practice them until they do, and stick with the fundamentals. Grip, stance, steady head, plane, rythym, etc. The 5 keys. If you are just starting, do this now so you don't have to unlearn bad habits. Sometimes you think you are doing something correctly but you aren't; a qualified teacher will spot and correct this quickly.


2. Get some good equipment that looks good, fits you reasonably well , and suits your game. It doesn't have to be the very best, but for the most part better is better. You can save a lot by buying at the end of the year just before or right after new models come out, and the beginning of the next year if there is still last year inventory in the pipeline, provided you can get what you need. Nothing wrong with used either if you know a little about what to look for-you can save over half this way. Replace your grips when they need it; you will have better field and not feel the need to trade as often.

3. Learn the rules, at least the bulk of them and play by them.

4. Play as much as you can, and go to the range as much as you can, provided you go with a purpose and not just to beat balls.

5. Practice your short game.

6. Practice your short game.

7. Practice your short game.
post #96 of 122
The main reason most people find golf hard and lose patience is because most take it up later on in life. Mainly due to money and most kids are not exposesd to golf. Here in the UK it would be football,rounders,hockey,and badminton or tennis you would play well before picking up a golf club unless your father plays and is rich enough to be a member who can show you some basics.
The game has a fair number of pro's who grew up hitting chips and putts on golf courses next to their home from a very young age.
They all developed feel for mechanics over those formative years before refinement later on.
When you are an adult you don't have that luxury so it takes patience to stick with it. I started in the 110's and now can break 90. Now the work really starts. Golf is long term improvement. I was 35 when I started playing. My abilities from other sports have been very helpful for golf. The requirement for precision is the most testing aspect of golf. If you can accept that poor shots will happen you will avoid frustration. Learn to love getting out of trouble. Escaping from a poor drive or from the rough greenside,from a bunker can be fun. Its a chance to be creative.
post #97 of 122

I was there about 16 years ago. Although my swing is flawed, I still manage to shoot in the low to mid 80s primarily related to short game saves. I managed to shoot 35 (even par) on the back nine last fall on a tough course. Too bad I had 46 on the front nine and a 3 putt bogey on the last green. I'm not sure what clicked, but after a downpour on #9 and 45 minute weather delay, I went back out and was hitting GIRs and putting for birdie and had a LOT of tap in pars. I still have some rounds in the 90s though, but I'll take an 81 on NCR North Course.

 

After many years of hacking it around the course, I've learned several things. First and foremost is to enjoy the game for what it is and not what is on the scorecard. It's great having that low score to talk about, but you will always end up wanting more. Second, you get out of the game what you put into it. Some people have natural ability or aptitude for golf, but most of us have to work at it. You have to enjoy practice too. Third, you have to rely on smart people (trained pros) to help you if you want to progress quickly and correctly. I have a self built swing for the most part, but think back to what could have been had I taken lessons early on. Lastly, learn and play by the rules of golf.

post #98 of 122
http://www.lakesidepress.com/Golf/Contents.htm

Have a read of this. It's got some great stuff really puts you in a proper mental space about golf. The guy is slightly negative though about talent and ability. I still think that I could be great if I had time and money to my advantage but it does set out the enormity of golf and a way to plan your way to a better game.
post #99 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brakkus View Post

http://www.lakesidepress.com/Golf/Contents.htm

Have a read of this. It's got some great stuff really puts you in a proper mental space about golf. The guy is slightly negative though about talent and ability. I still think that I could be great if I had time and money to my advantage but it does set out the enormity of golf and a way to plan your way to a better game.


Interesting read.

 

365,000 balls to get to scratch? That's a lot.

 

I wonder if even after hitting 185,000 balls if I can get to the single digits?

post #100 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbuck View Post

I am a bogey golfer--maybe just slightly better than bogey. If I shoot 41/82 I feel pretty good, 42/85 ok, 45/90 meh, over 45/over90 a little disgusted.

I have been playing fairly consistently for a little over 40 years. There have been a couple years when I didn't play much, one year when I think I played twice, and a few years where I played 3-4 times a week. But generally, I have played at least once a week during the season for about 40 years. Back in my late 20's early 30's, I got close to single digit, but not quite. I did not carry an official handicap then, but was shooting regularly in the low 80's with an occasional foray into the 70's or at least 30's on 9.

I was mostly self taught until college, when I decided to take some lessons. I had to unlearn some things, so there was a rebuilding process, but I have basically had the same swing ever since. I had maxed out in my self taught way and gotten to the low 90's, but after the pain of unlearning some things, the lessons and some new equipment got me into the 80's on a more regular basis.

I told you my "life story" to say that through all this I have learned what I think are some points:

1. Get a lesson or 3 from a qualified instructor, and learn the correct fundamentals. Many things may not "feel natural" at first, but practice them until they do, and stick with the fundamentals. Grip, stance, steady head, plane, rythym, etc. The 5 keys. If you are just starting, do this now so you don't have to unlearn bad habits. Sometimes you think you are doing something correctly but you aren't; a qualified teacher will spot and correct this quickly.


2. Get some good equipment that looks good, fits you reasonably well , and suits your game. It doesn't have to be the very best, but for the most part better is better. You can save a lot by buying at the end of the year just before or right after new models come out, and the beginning of the next year if there is still last year inventory in the pipeline, provided you can get what you need. Nothing wrong with used either if you know a little about what to look for-you can save over half this way. Replace your grips when they need it; you will have better field and not feel the need to trade as often.

3. Learn the rules, at least the bulk of them and play by them.

4. Play as much as you can, and go to the range as much as you can, provided you go with a purpose and not just to beat balls.

5. Practice your short game.

6. Practice your short game.

7. Practice your short game
.


I agree with the first 4 points.

The kind of emphasis you place on the short game can very easily lead someone to remain "just slightly better than a bogey golfer" after 40 years though.

You're not losing many strokes with an even mediocre short game. You're losing them with a full swing game that forces you to try to make them up with your short game....

....me too.
post #101 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

I agree with the first 4 points.

The kind of emphasis you place on the short game can very easily lead someone to remain "just slightly better than a bogey golfer" after 40 years though.

You're not losing many strokes with an even mediocre short game. You're losing them with a full swing game that forces you to try to make them up with your short game....

....me too.

Me 3.
post #102 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlSpackler View Post



Me 3.

 



Yeah, I was probably a little frustrated because my first time out this year which was last week, I was 3 over after 5 including a double on the first, and laying 2 about 20 yards from the pin on the par 5 sixth, and proceded to take 5 to get down from there. I had hit 4 fairways and one of the 2 par 3's to that point. Mostly frustration I doubled out on the remaining easy par 5 and 2 short par 4's. A mediocre short game would have given me bogeys at worst.

I still believe the short game can give you bang for the buck moving from say 20+ to 15, but you shouldn't neglect the long game to the point of relying totally on the short game; you have to hit more greens. So maybe I should have listed it once instead of 3 times, LOL.
post #103 of 122
Thread Starter 

I know that I am making progress and all but I still find myself getting frustrated. Sometime I have my swing and I am doing really well. Then the next minute I lose it and I can't figure out what went wrong. I know that will probably improve with practice but it still can de-motivate you. 

post #104 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fromthecoast View Post
 

I know that I am making progress and all but I still find myself getting frustrated. Sometime I have my swing and I am doing really well. Then the next minute I lose it and I can't figure out what went wrong. I know that will probably improve with practice but it still can de-motivate you. 


Been there done that. This is why it's important to love the game for what it is, not what you score, and work to get better scores. Even touring pros will say that they left a few out there or they didn't hit it very well when they shot even par. When I think back to my best rounds, I tend to think about those few shots that could have been. Be realistic with yourself and keep working to improve. It will come.

post #105 of 122
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post


I agree with the first 4 points.

The kind of emphasis you place on the short game can very easily lead someone to remain "just slightly better than a bogey golfer" after 40 years though.

You're not losing many strokes with an even mediocre short game. You're losing them with a full swing game that forces you to try to make them up with your short game....

....me too.

 

I was thinking the same thing when I read the post actually.. I remember when I first started playing the saying I always heard was drive for show and putt for dough or something like that, and to be honest I thought that was reality, until I saw the statistics broken down and explained here on this website.. I was losing a lot of shots with my short game, but now that I have that pretty much under control, I still find that my shots are really lost off the T putting me in spots that make me lost more shots until I get into an area that doesn't have 3 or 4 trees in front of me to utilize my short game :)

 

Yes.. there is a hope for improvement.. I really believe!

post #106 of 122

Well, let me share my state.  I started exactly a year ago.  Took 2 1/2 months lesson at indoor golf shop and practiced quite often for about 3 months after that.  During those I went out to play weekend golf occasionally with some of buddies and scores were probably good 110-120ish since there were a couple of mulligans, don't count this/that, double par esc, etc.  Then my body started taking effects of hitting too many in too short time so I had to shut down for 3 months without hitting balls at all.  I felt miserable but at the same I took those time to practice chipping and putting exclusively since I couldn't hit full shots beyond 20 yd chips.   This was blessing in disguise because I really started getting the feel of of chipping and also recognized great importance of putting.  I watched a lot of video's and snooped around forums like TST to improve overall game.  Then came around Jan of this year, I went out the local course with my coworkers and shot 97.  I was really surprised that I could break 100.  And then subsequently, 91,93,94, most recently 89 my personal best.  I feel like I have a long way to be called a "golfer" instead of a hacker but at least now I feel comfortable of hitting a decent shot and make a bogey out of many holes.  This made golf really enjoyable for me.

 

When it comes to improving game, I am actively pursuing and looking for improvement as much as possible.  Try to find your game through many outlets, resources, lessons, etc.  One thing really helped me during chip/putt months is Lefty's short game video.  I watched maybe 10 times going through back and force and still occasionally watch segment during spare time.  Worth more than $1k individual teaching IMO.  

 

Anyway, I have so much to improve from driving to chipping to putting to mental game but I'm always looking forward to next.  That's why I love game of golf

post #107 of 122
Thread Starter 

Still a hacker but I am improving. My scoring average is down to 105, and I've taken 6 strokes off my handicap in 60 days. My last few scores have just been right over 100, but I feel like I am on the cusp of making some major improvements that will get me into the 90s. My FW% is steadily increasing and I'm even starting to hit some greens in regulation occasionally. I think a mid 90s score is just right around the corner. I don't personally think scoring in the 90s is going to make me a decent golfer, but I am starting to get around the course like I know what I am doing. I think I will be able to consider myself a decent golfer, at least for my goals, once I get into the upper 80's (long term goal). Right now, the goal is consistent 90's by the end of the year. 

post #108 of 122
Thread Starter 

Today was a really good day for me. I recently bought some new irons that I really had my eye on and played them for the first time today. I signed up at one of my local courses for a "range" membership because I've really wanted to be able to go and work on my wedge and <100 yard game. I did just that this morning for maybe an hour and a half. Took off shortly after that to my local muni where I have a membership and started walking 18 with a positive attitude based on my practice session. I had been stuck at just a hair over 100 and I knew that my short game was killing me. Under 100 yards I was losing a lot of strokes. In any event, I definitely hit my wedges better although not perfect. I felt like it was at least 50/50 good versus bad, and my misses were fat shots. My driving has really been improving for weeks. I'm taking a long swing, but keeping it very relaxed and I'm very happy with the results. With the exceptions of my flat out bad drives (tops) I'm hitting a nice high and straight drive and finding myself in the 200-250 range, probably averaging around 220-230 off the tee. With the exception of on OB with my driver (which is becoming rare) that was caused by not finishing my shot, I did pretty well. 93% of my drives were playable and I hit 64% of the fairways. Could be better but I was happy. 

 

At least now I can say that I successfully broke 100 and not by a hair. I ended up with a 95 today and what was really amazing to me is that I can see how that easily could have been an 88 or 89 after looking at the score card. Practicing my half wedge shots was huge for me and it definitely contributed today. Now the heat is really on to prove that I am now a mid 90's or better player. The other good news is that the handicap is coming down. I'm down to a 28.1 now and while I still don't consider that a "good" golfer, I am really excited about the progress that I have made. Playing and practicing in April and May have taken me further than I would have expected for the beginning of June. 

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