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Should I switch to one plane swing?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I'm getting really tired of my swing feeling great for a few weeks, and then feeling like I've never picked up a club for another few weeks. I'm not sure if it's because my swing is reliant on timing or what (generally when things go south my takeaway feels incredibly awkward, which sets the tone for the whole swing).  Been reading about the one plane swing and how it's much less reliant on timing; would it be beneficial to make the change?  What are the cons (loss of distance)?  Interested to hear everyone's thoughts.  

post #2 of 12
If you're looking to build a better swing, I'd use the 5SK stuff on this site. Best instruction, both paid and otherwise.
post #3 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundandFury View Post
 

I'm getting really tired of my swing feeling great for a few weeks, and then feeling like I've never picked up a club for another few weeks. I'm not sure if it's because my swing is reliant on timing or what (generally when things go south my takeaway feels incredibly awkward, which sets the tone for the whole swing).  Been reading about the one plane swing and how it's much less reliant on timing; would it be beneficial to make the change?  What are the cons (loss of distance)?  Interested to hear everyone's thoughts.  

One Plane Swing is such a vague concept. Everyone swings on more than one plane so the definition varies from coach to coach and method to method. Looking at the PGA it seems the vast majority have their forearm more-or-less in line with their shoulder pitch at A4 (which is just one of many possible definitions of a OPS) and I don't see many of them suffering for distance. If that's the kind of OPS you're referring to than yeas, I would say it's a simpler more repeatable motion than what guys like Fred Couples and Bubba Watson do.

 

 

To me , it looks like Bubba has a lot more moving pieces to keep in sequence and that's disregarding the fact that he is also miles past parallel.:bugout:

Personally, I'd rather have Rory's swing than Bubba's. 

post #4 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

One Plane Swing is such a vague concept. Everyone swings on more than one plane so the definition varies from coach to coach and method to method. Looking at the PGA it seems the vast majority have their forearm more-or-less in line with their shoulder pitch at A4 (which is just one of many possible definitions of a OPS) and I don't see many of them suffering for distance. If that's the kind of OPS you're referring to than yeas, I would say it's a simpler more repeatable motion than what guys like Fred Couples and Bubba Watson do.

 

 

 

Yet Bubba and Fred can repeat it pretty good. I suspect there are some generalized benefits to both type of swings. I think what matters most is a golfers ability to master their own swing. 

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

I'm referring specifically to this type backswing/position at the top.

 

post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

One Plane Swing is such a vague concept. Everyone swings on more than one plane so the definition varies from coach to coach and method to method. Looking at the PGA it seems the vast majority have their forearm more-or-less in line with their shoulder pitch at A4 (which is just one of many possible definitions of a OPS) and I don't see many of them suffering for distance. If that's the kind of OPS you're referring to than yeas, I would say it's a simpler more repeatable motion than what guys like Fred Couples and Bubba Watson do.

 

 

To me , it looks like Bubba has a lot more moving pieces to keep in sequence and that's disregarding the fact that he is also miles past parallel.:bugout:

Personally, I'd rather have Rory's swing than Bubba's. 

Based on these pictures (and my understanding of the one plane swing), Rory is MUCH closer to a one plane swing than a two plane swing, and Bubba looks to be very much in a two plane position, e.g., arms lifted way above the shoulder plane.  

post #7 of 12

I believe Rory is a two-plane swing. He gets above the plane slightly in the backswing and drops it underneath in the downswing. 

 

Still, no real advantage to one or the other. Its just personal preference depending on the golfer. 

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundandFury View Post

Based on these pictures (and my understanding of the one plane swing), Rory is MUCH closer to a one plane swing than a two plane swing, and Bubba looks to be very much in a two plane position, e.g., arms lifted way above the shoulder plane.  
Yes, I would consider Rory a one planer. I think one plane swings are in the majority on the Tour. Plenty of Majors have been won with a two plane swing too though.
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post


Yes, I would consider Rory a one planer. I think one plane swings are in the majority on the Tour. Plenty of Majors have been won with a two plane swing too though.


I wish the golfing world would standardize the meaning of "swing plane". Easy for people to be talking about completely different things when they start talking about a swing plane.

 

Personally, I have the same definition that this guy does, but many people don't.

post #10 of 12

What about Matt Kutchar? 

 

 

Would he be considered two plane, under plane, or just special? 

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by MS256 View Post


I wish the golfing world would standardize the meaning of "swing plane". Easy for people to be talking about completely different things when they start talking about a swing plane.

I agree. My personal solution, don't worry about it. b2_tongue.gif
post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MS256 View Post
 


I wish the golfing world would standardize the meaning of "swing plane". Easy for people to be talking about completely different things when they start talking about a swing plane.

 

Personally, I have the same definition that this guy does, but many people don't.

Yup, this is what I'm talking about.  

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