or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Haney Blueprint - Page 2

post #19 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

Let's ask good questions, please.

Besides, even people who teach based on the "old way" can still answer this question correctly.

@LukasM
 here is my question for you: what does the system or method used by Haney instructors view as the commonalities all golfers should be striving to have?

I'm assuming that you're talking about full swing but All golfers should be striving to eliminate there very worst mistake... Sky ball...slice out of bounds... Duffing chips...whatever the shot may be you want to eliminate the shot that ruins holes and rounds
post #20 of 50
Ok I'm sorry, why no questions?
post #21 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM View Post

Ok I'm sorry, why no questions?

He just meant that HE has no questions.

 

Welcome to the site. 

 

:beer: 

post #22 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM View Post

Ok I'm sorry, why no questions?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post

He just meant that HE has no questions.

Welcome to the site. 

c2_beer.gif  

Exactly. Not to say that I won't at some time in the future though!

Regardless, I'm sure you'll have a lot to contribute to our happy little community outside of instruction too.
post #23 of 50
Haha. Thanks!
post #24 of 50
I watched Hank Haney try to teach Michael Phelps on the Golf Channel a while back. It seemed like Hank had Phelps pound balls until his hands were blistered up. The main swing thought was to keep the club on an inside to outside path. After a bunch of full swings, Hank would chastise Michael that he was losing focus and getting sloppy.

Anyway, I was struck by the number of balls Phelps was hitting. Is that something Haney believes in? Sheer repetition at full speed, row after row of range balls. Does he ever advocate slowing down the swing to get the motion right and ingrained in front of a mirror, and easing up on the number of full swings at the range?

Other than an inside to outside swing path, what are the other core elements to the swing that you teach? I recall Haney did not have a cookie cutter approach. He worked with each student on the show individually based on how they swing naturally, but I can't recall what elements he thinks are "must haves" for a reliable swing. I assume "inside to outside" swing path is one if them based on the Phelps episodes.
post #25 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM View Post

Hey guys, I found this thread on sort of a random search. I'm a teacher for Hank Haney in Dallas and would love to entertain questions from you all. I may be able to give you insight that you would find interesting.


@LukasM, welcome to the forum.

 

How much “Haney” is there in the instruction that you (and the other Haney instructors) provide, and how much is based on your own individual understanding and experience (which might include other sources—e.g., TGM, Stack and Tilt) as you see appropriate to supplement it or expand/improve it? 

 

To phrase it another way, how much uniformity is there in methodology in the Haney instruction world?  Thanks!

post #26 of 50
@LukasM What swing keys or fundamentals do you advocate as a must in every swing to have a successful swing? For example, 5SK advocates 5 keys; steady head, weight forward, etc. The keys you list, how are they unique to the Haney system, and how do they differ from all others?
post #27 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM View Post

Where the ball starts is influenced by both face and path... Predominately face

@LukasM check out the my swing (XXX) threads. Quite a few experts on here help out our members with their swings.
post #28 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by RandallT View Post

I watched Hank Haney try to teach Michael Phelps on the Golf Channel a while back. It seemed like Hank had Phelps pound balls until his hands were blistered up. The main swing thought was to keep the club on an inside to outside path. After a bunch of full swings, Hank would chastise Michael that he was losing focus and getting sloppy.

Anyway, I was struck by the number of balls Phelps was hitting. Is that something Haney believes in? Sheer repetition at full speed, row after row of range balls. Does he ever advocate slowing down the swing to get the motion right and ingrained in front of a mirror, and easing up on the number of full swings at the range?

Other than an inside to outside swing path, what are the other core elements to the swing that you teach? I recall Haney did not have a cookie cutter approach. He worked with each student on the show individually based on how they swing naturally, but I can't recall what elements he thinks are "must haves" for a reliable swing. I assume "inside to outside" swing path is one if them based on the Phelps episodes.

I was there for the first Haney project with Barkley. (I was the guy that put all of the balls on the tee). Haha. Hank believes in having a plan and working hard. When you try to make a change first try it at full speed. If you can't feel it at full speed go slow... And slower. If you can't get it going slow then break it into parts.

The number one thing for us is fixing the ball...
post #29 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missouri Swede View Post

@LukasM
, welcome to the forum.

How much “Haney” is there in the instruction that you (and the other Haney instructors) provide, and how much is based on your own individual understanding and experience (which might include other sources—e.g., TGM, Stack and Tilt) as you see appropriate to supplement it or expand/improve it? 

To phrase it another way, how much uniformity is there in methodology in the Haney instruction world?  Thanks!

For me personally I started learning the golf swing under Steve Johnson. He's the closest thing to Hank himself. I've watched him and many other guys that have been around hank a long time for hundreds and hundreds of hours. And I've had the chance to watch Hank teach for a couple hundred hours. My time around other ways of teaching is limited.

All the instructors that work with Hank focus on fixing the ball flight and making sure that the students have fun. The best advice Hank has given me was "react to the ball". And to not take a trip to Scotland to see some girl hahaha
post #30 of 50
Well... Our analysis starts backwards... We see the ball flight first... Then we picture how the impact had to have been to produce that ball flight... After that how did the club move throughout the whole swing to produce the impact that caused the ball flight... Finally we look at what you did with your hands ,arms and body to move the club the way it moved that produced the impact that caused the ball flight... Hahah. I'm not a writer.

The swing plane influences to a great extent three things. How much ground you hit, where on the club face you make contact, and whether or not the club face comes back square. That's a big thing for us
post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missouri Swede View Post
 


@LukasM, welcome to the forum.

 

How much “Haney” is there in the instruction that you (and the other Haney instructors) provide, and how much is based on your own individual understanding and experience (which might include other sources—e.g., TGM, Stack and Tilt) as you see appropriate to supplement it or expand/improve it? 

 

To phrase it another way, how much uniformity is there in methodology in the Haney instruction world?  Thanks!

This is a question that fascinates me, whether it's asked about Haney's "people", Leadbetter's "people" or any other instruction that falls into a Name Brand Philosophy. Are the approaches identical from instructor to instructor? Do they/can they deviate from the path (no pun intended) or is that anathema? 

 

I don't think that @LukasM answered this, or maybe I missed it? Anyway, would like to hear the reply as I am curious as to how this works.

 

Tempted to send in some vids just to see how much the Haney approach may or may not differ from what I am being taught.

post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM View Post

Well... Our analysis starts backwards... We see the ball flight first... Then we picture how the impact had to have been to produce that ball flight... After that how did the club move throughout the whole swing to produce the impact that caused the ball flight... Finally we look at what you did with your hands ,arms and body to move the club the way it moved that produced the impact that caused the ball flight... Hahah. I'm not a writer.

The swing plane influences to a great extent three things. How much ground you hit, where on the club face you make contact, and whether or not the club face comes back square. That's a big thing for us

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM View Post


The number one thing for us is fixing the ball...

 

Now I am curious.

 

If the process is dependent on looking at, and subsequently working backwards from the ball flight, how do you analyze a swing based on a video emailed to you as you've asked us to do?

 

Most less skilled players aren't necessarily able to accurately describe their ball flight, let alone trajectory.  They may know that the ball tends to "go right" for them, but there's a huge difference between someone hitting a push-draw and someone hitting a pull-hook.  They may think that their ball flight begins on one side or another of the target line, but due to alignment issues that they're not even aware of, they may be completely wrong.  Heck, there are a lot of mid-high handicap players who will tell you that solid ball-striking is a strength.  They're not lying, they just don't have the point of reference to even know what good contact/ball-striking really is.

 

With the ball flight so critical to your process, but without actually seeing the ball flight or how the student aligns to an actual target, how do you weed through the student's own lack of experience and fundamental knowledge when it comes to describing what they're actually seeing/doing?

post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

Most less skilled players aren't necessarily able to accurately describe their ball flight, let alone trajectory.  They may know that the ball tends to "go right" for them, but there's a huge difference between someone hitting a push-draw and someone hitting a pull-hook.  They may think that their ball flight begins on one side or another of the target line, but due to alignment issues that they're not even aware of, they may be completely wrong.  Heck, there are a lot of mid-high handicap players who will tell you that solid ball-striking is a strength.  They're not lying, they just don't have the point of reference to even know what good contact/ball-striking really is.

With the ball flight so critical to your process, but without actually seeing the ball flight or how the student aligns to an actual target, how do you weed through the student's own lack of experience and fundamental knowledge when it comes to describing what they're actually seeing/doing?

The students analysis will give me a hint... I could ask which way does your driver curve? Student says slice.
I ask where do you miss with short irons?
Student says left.
I ask how much ground do you tend to hit? Too much or not enough?
Student says too much.
Where on the face do you tend to hit.
Student says toe.

After something like this I know the club is swinging into the ball too steep.
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by LukasM View Post


The students analysis will give me a hint... I could ask which way does your driver curve? Student says slice.
I ask where do you miss with short irons?
Student says left.
I ask how much ground do you tend to hit? Too much or not enough?
Student says too much.
Where on the face do you tend to hit.
Student says toe.

After something like this I know the club is swinging into the ball too steep.

 

Interesting, thanks.

 

I'm assuming that there are any number of things going wrong in most of our swings.  Once you've landed on "too steep", do you look for a single priority piece to work on, or is it more of an overhaul of the entire thing?  In either case, how do you proceed from there?

post #35 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

Interesting, thanks.

I'm assuming that there are any number of things going wrong in most of our swings.  Once you've landed on "too steep", do you look for a single priority piece to work on, or is it more of an overhaul of the entire thing?  In either case, how do you proceed from there?

I'll prioritize. What ever the most crucial mistake you have that's causing the worst mistake. If the club swings into the ball too steep then where did the club first get off track. Could just be on the way down or maybe it's off going back. I'll start where it gets off
post #36 of 50
Saw haney's video--too long and too much $ for blueprint. His book is cheaper and stresses swing path, which appears to be the direction of his blueprint. Book also takes a different approach compared to many others and makes some good points.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Instruction and Playing Tips