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Player seeks advice on almost every Tee. - Page 2

post #19 of 42

Find another dude to complete your foursome or bust his balls for the shit he pulls until he stops or quits playing with you. I have little toleration for inconsiderate players.

post #20 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

Well done.

 

The closest I've seen on our tour is when one of the organizers came up to our group on the 16th green and told us that we were too far behind.  Then he told us he'd help us catch back up.  He rode with us along 17 to make sure that any lost balls would be found and then when we got to 18 tee, we were caught up.  He drive back to the group behind us to help them catch up.

 

 

This is exactly what we do as well. Acting as forecaddie, helping the players to find their balls, riding close to them putting a bit of pressure... and it works, most of the time.

post #21 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ignorant View Post
 

 

This is exactly what we do as well. Acting as forecaddie, helping the players to find their balls, riding close to them putting a bit of pressure... and it works, most of the time.

 

lol... did you ever think that you riding close to them and that pressure is what is making them hit so many balls in the woods?  just saying.

post #22 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ignorant View Post

This is exactly what we do as well. Acting as forecaddie, helping the players to find their balls, riding close to them putting a bit of pressure... and it works, most of the time.

So, the slow players get rewarded? Did all of the other players have the benefit of you assisting them - forecaddies, search etc? Is this consistent with the principle in 34-2/3?
post #23 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogolf View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ignorant View Post

 

This is exactly what we do as well. Acting as forecaddie, helping the players to find their balls, riding close to them putting a bit of pressure... and it works, most of the time.

 

So, the slow players get rewarded? Did all of the other players have the benefit of you assisting them - forecaddies, search etc? Is this consistent with the principle in 34-2/3?

 

The way I see it, who gets rewarded are the players in the following groups as they do not need to wait all the time for the preceding group in trouble.

 

Afa D34-2/3 is concerned this practice is very much consistent with it when you think of it. That Dec does not say that a referee must prevent all players from breaching a Rule but only those he can see being about to do it. Same thing with a slow group, they are ones in need of assistance. It goes without saying that if I happen to be in a position to do it I always point out the location of a competitor's ball if I saw it land and it might be tricky or time-consuming to find. I don't see any kind of consistency problem there, quite on the contrary.


Edited by Ignorant - 4/9/14 at 2:03pm
post #24 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abu3baid View Post
 

 

lol... did you ever think that you riding close to them and that pressure is what is making them hit so many balls in the woods?  just saying.

 

You do have a point there. Some players get nervous as soon as they even see a referee, then again some do not. This is just something they need to learn when competing. If they fall behind a referee is expected to show up at some point, and if they cannot pick up pace they will be re-visited by a referee again.

 

Riding close is just a term. Once 'escorting' a group the referee should remain out of direct sight as much as possible but close enough to be able to help them. Sometimes that is not easy.

 

Feedback from the players for this kind of assisting and 'putting pressure' has been mainly positive, and the negative feedback almost wihout exception comes from players already permanently slow and/or hot headed types. The key is to get them understand they are being helped.

post #25 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by madolive3 View Post
 

We have a guy that plays with us occasionally who it seems  is always asking me which club I'm using or how or where am I hitting my tee shot.

 He also takes several practice swings and takes forever on every shot. We hate playing with him but he works with us, so it's almost unavoidable sometimes.

 When does the clock start on his swing, is it forty seconds to take a shot  and seeking advice from anyone but a teammate is a penalty?  Thanks, I just want to be sure when I warn him that I'll start adding strokes to his score.

 Another thing, he also cheats when I ask him is score on a hole, he'll lie and shave some of his strokes., hate playing with the guy.

 

I consider myself lucky that I started being a regular on a golf course at the age of five and had my father and numerous peers of his to teach me exactly what was and wasn't expected of me on the golf course.

 

Some people weren't as lucky and simply don't know these things and the only way they are going to find out is by being helped by others. I understand, however, how difficult it might be to provide this 'help' to a grown man rather than a five year old!

 

The one thing I think should be easier to deal with is the shaving. If you don't already, then make a real effort to keep track of every shot he hits and from where. When he says 'Five!' as you're walking off the green it can be tricky if all you can say is, "Oh, I thought you had seven".

 

However, if you can say "Oh, I thought you hit your tee shot in the rough on the right, two back on to the fairway, three to the semi-rough at the back of the green, chipped on for four about 20ft below the hole, putted about six feet past and then left the one back about six inches short and tapped in, so I make it a seven", there's very little he can come back with. Once you've recited every shot he's played on several holes he should get the idea that he either needs to stop lying or that he should pay a bit more attention!

post #26 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by madolive3 View Post
 

Thanks for the responses. I'm not sure with this guy. One of our guys is teeing up a drive, at address and this knuckle head is taking practice swings on the tee behind him. We are on the green at 18, I'm putting for par, as I take my stroke he rips the velcro on his glove.

 Talking doesn't get thru to this fool, I've tried talking to him at times and he gets defensive.

what's the problem with this underlined?

 

Is that forbidden in the golf rules? Youre not supposed to take divots with practice strokes as far as I remember golf rules but I don't know... I'm just a beginner.

 

I've done practice strokes at the same time when the hitting player is making his/her practice strokes, I can play my own shot faster...

 

I don't make unpleasant noises when hitting player is addressing the ball ready to hit it.:-O

post #27 of 42

I've taken practice swings on the tee box, but...I make dang sure, that 1 I do not take a divot,..2 I don't make any sound, and 3..that the person that's hitting can not see me. I'm far enough away that my swing doesn't bother anyone. Now, if it's a smallish tee  box, I'll refrain from making any movements at all. And unless someone says something about practice swings, I'll make them.

 

I don't like it when someone talks, or moves about when I'm teeing off, however if they are out of sight, and want to make practice swings, that's fine with me. Of course the above is during practice rounds or rounds between friends. In any other setting, I would Not do the same.

post #28 of 42

Some of the guys I play with in casual rounds will ask what I hit before they hit.  It is not a tournament and they never play in tournaments so I tell them.  Again, casual round.  They don't do it every hole or every shot.  Should be obvious if I have driver in my hand.  Other clubs...maybe not.

Now, as far as not giving correct score, if I know they are wrong I will usually say something like Let's count them again and I start out telling what I saw.  They usually take the hint quickly.  Only takes a time or two.

From what I read, y'all aren't playing in tournaments.  You are just playing golf.  I wouldn't start throwing rules around to him.  I might say something like, "If we were playing in a tournament, I couldn't advise you what club I hit"  Of course, there are times when you can...when you are playing partner tournaments for example and he is your partner.

And, if you guys are playing stuff like robins or wolf and he is your partner, then he could ask you.

I have played with some people in the past who really grated on me but I try to make the best of it and try to change the person before I completely give up on them.   That is just me.

You say y'all work together.  So other than golf, do you get along?  Do you like him at work?

post #29 of 42

I really think it's time to get tough with this guy. You can be direct without being uncivil. He's clearly ruining your game and surely enjoyment is more important than the feelings of a buffoon! My friend and I started around the same time and he had the most annoying habits. He would pick up other peoples ball to check if it was his and then just toss it back down. He would walk across putting lines etc. One day I told him I wasn't asking, I was telling...quit it!!! The following few holes were a bit silent but by the end of the round we were buddies again. People get over things and if he doesn't it's his problem not yours.

post #30 of 42

Why not act like an adult and speak to the man

 

Explain were he is going wrong and ask him to refrain from doing it again, If he doesn't then insist that he finds other people to play golf with

 

I actually don't see the problem with the "Advice" thing, Unless you are playing for money

post #31 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slk1981 View Post
 

Why not act like an adult and speak to the man

 

Explain were he is going wrong and ask him to refrain from doing it again, If he doesn't then insist that he finds other people to play golf with

 

I actually don't see the problem with the "Advice" thing, Unless you are playing for money

 

If the guy is submitting scores for handicap it is a problem even if not playing for money.  And if the OP and the guy are in the same club the OP has a responsibility here.

post #32 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slk1981 View Post
 

Why not act like an adult and speak to the man

 

Explain were he is going wrong and ask him to refrain from doing it again, If he doesn't then insist that he finds other people to play golf with

 

I actually don't see the problem with the "Advice" thing, Unless you are playing for money

 

If the guy is submitting scores for handicap it is a problem even if not playing for money.  And if the OP and the guy are in the same club the OP has a responsibility here.

I don't mind if someone is posting a score that may be lower than it would be without the advice. I don't think the governing body would care either.

post #33 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdsandy View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slk1981 View Post
 

Why not act like an adult and speak to the man

 

Explain were he is going wrong and ask him to refrain from doing it again, If he doesn't then insist that he finds other people to play golf with

 

I actually don't see the problem with the "Advice" thing, Unless you are playing for money

 

If the guy is submitting scores for handicap it is a problem even if not playing for money.  And if the OP and the guy are in the same club the OP has a responsibility here.

I don't mind if someone is posting a score that may be lower than it would be without the advice. I don't think the governing body would care either.

 

It would matter to you if he ended up on your team in a best ball or alternate shot as the "A" player when he was really no better than a "B".

post #34 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post
 

 

If the guy is submitting scores for handicap it is a problem even if not playing for money.  And if the OP and the guy are in the same club the OP has a responsibility here.

 

 

Why?

 

Is his handicap effecting anybody else on the course? Does his handicap give him some sort of head start

 

Myself and the two friends I play with are quite new to golf (18 months) and we ask advice from each other all through the round, What club to use, best place to aim  etc, Should we throw away our clubs and never play another round of golf?

 

You are playing for fun, your not in a comp and no money is involved, Why the big issue, Like I said earlier, If there is a problem speak to him like an adult instead of crying about it on a forum

post #35 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slk1981 View Post
 

 

 

Why?

 

Is his handicap effecting anybody else on the course? Does his handicap give him some sort of head start

 

Myself and the two friends I play with are quite new to golf (18 months) and we ask advice from each other all through the round, What club to use, best place to aim  etc, Should we throw away our clubs and never play another round of golf?

 

You are playing for fun, your not in a comp and no money is involved, Why the big issue, Like I said earlier, If there is a problem speak to him like an adult instead of crying about it on a forum

 

You can play any way you like.  But if you are going to play "for real", which means in a competition or in a round that will count for handicap purposes (in the US all rounds are supposed to count for handicap for anyone maintaining a handicap) you should be playing by the rules.  Which means no asking or giving advice.  Other than those situations, if you do not maintain a handicap or you maintain a handicap but under the rules of your governing body the round does not count for handicap purposes, then do whatever you like.

 

I DO agree with you about speaking to him, but I think it is unfair to characterize the OP as crying on a forum.  It sounded to me like he wanted to verify just what the relevant rules are while doing a little venting.  IF you are going to speak to a player about a rules violation then you should be sure you are correct on the rule and it sounds like the OP was doing that,

post #36 of 42
Quote:
Originally Posted by turtleback View Post
 

 

You can play any way you like.  But if you are going to play "for real", which means in a competition or in a round that will count for handicap purposes (in the US all rounds are supposed to count for handicap for anyone maintaining a handicap) you should be playing by the rules.  Which means no asking or giving advice.  Other than those situations, if you do not maintain a handicap or you maintain a handicap but under the rules of your governing body the round does not count for handicap purposes, then do whatever you like.

 

I DO agree with you about speaking to him, but I think it is unfair to characterize the OP as crying on a forum.  It sounded to me like he wanted to verify just what the relevant rules are while doing a little venting.  IF you are going to speak to a player about a rules violation then you should be sure you are correct on the rule and it sounds like the OP was doing that,

 

I agree 100% but reading the OP first post it would seem its just friends/work mates playing golf, if that is the case then is there really a issue with someone asking what club you have used or what club they would go with on a certain shot?

 

The time wasting/shot shaving is another matter all together and would annoy anybody

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