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Scots Golf Ball Flight Teaser - Page 2

post #19 of 34
Thread Starter 
Sorry iacas, I was responding to you.
post #20 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scots Golf View Post

Here's a teaser on ball flights. What are the two ball flights that do not have a name. I.e there are 2 shots you can hit that do not come under one of the 9 ball flights described.

 

There are three swing path orientations at impact, three positions the clubface can be in relative to those swing paths. There are only 9 ball flights. Now the severity of the curve just depends on actual numbers, but there are only 9 ball flights

post #21 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

There are three swing path orientations at impact, three positions the clubface can be in relative to those swing paths. There are only 9 ball flights. Now the severity of the curve just depends on actual numbers, but there are only 9 ball flights

 

Yep.

 

The only other reasonable answer is that there are only three possible ball flights: a ball that curves left, a ball that curves right, and a straight one.

post #22 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scots Golf View Post

Here's a teaser on ball flights. What are the two ball flights that do not have a name. I.e there are 2 shots you can hit that do not come under one of the 9 ball flights described.

topped shot - shank or topped shot and a severe popup?

post #23 of 34
Thread Starter 
Agreed iacas the club can only be open square or closed at impact causing the ball to curve left right or go straight.
To saevel what laws would you say my 2 described shots come under? I understand what you are saying but if you can't get pernickety when talking about the ball flights when can you lol?
post #24 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scots Golf View Post

A draw is just a draw surely. You can't hit a pull draw so why a push draw.

Ps what chart do you mean? Also do you not measure every shot relative to a target.

 

This chart

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scots Golf View Post

A shot starts left of target, curves to the right yet still finishes left of target. Similarly there's no name for the shot that starts right, curves to the left yet still finishes right of intended target.
 

If E is the target it would be a pull fade and the other would be a push draw, check out the chart.

post #25 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvmac View Post
 

 

And you can twist that chart so that A is the target, or I is the target.

 

Those terms are relative to the golfer's alignment.

 

Trevino? A push-fader.

post #26 of 34
Thread Starter 
Trevino is the perfect example he always hit a push slice. What if the ball finishes at position B however. The fade and draw shots C and G both intend that the ball has finished at the target E.
post #27 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scots Golf View Post

Trevino is the perfect example he always hit a push slice. What if the ball finishes at position B however. The fade and draw shots C and G both intend that the ball has finished at the target E.

 

B would be a straight shot, he aimed his body left, aimed the face slightly more to the right of his body but still left of the target, push fade. It sure wasn't a "slice" ;-)

 

You're taking the illustration too literally, a push draw doesn't mean it has to finish exactly at the target, otherwise you'd have to draw A LOT more lines on the chart.

post #28 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

Who says you can't hit a pull draw? Face is pointing left of target at impact and path is outward - bam - pull draw. Also known as a snap hook, duck hook, shitty shot, etc...

Bam!!! :beer:

 

I've hit about a million of them. Usually when there's OB right and I start chickening out about half way to the ball and roll that puppy over.

post #29 of 34
Thread Starter 
If the ball curved to the right finishing at point B though when the target was E.
I read the article that chart comes from and the author states that shot type C and G both finish on target. As I suggested there is no law that accounts for the shot mentioned above.
post #30 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scots Golf View Post

If the ball curved to the right finishing at point B though when the target was E.
I read the article that chart comes from and the author states that shot type C and G both finish on target.

 

I feel as though you're being intentionally obtuse. The shots depicted are properly named if the golfer is aligned with a target directly north (up) and is right-handed.

 

The target can be at any of the locations A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I… or anywhere else. It doesn't change the name of the shot.

 

For righties:

  • A push-draw is one that starts right of the golfer's alignment and curves left.
  • A pull-draw is one that starts left of the golfer's alignment and curves left.
  • A push-fade is one that starts right of the golfer's alignment and curves right.

 

The target isn't considered in there. It can be anywhere.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scots Golf View Post

As I suggested there is no law that accounts for the shot mentioned above.

 

The bold above speaks to this, as best as I can figure. Since you won't quote anyone and you're being vague or something, it's tough to know exactly what you mean.

 

Where a shot finishes is not considered when you describe the shape of the ball flight.

post #31 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scots Golf View Post

If the ball curved to the right finishing at point B though when the target was E.
I read the article that chart comes from and the author states that shot type C and G both finish on target. As I suggested there is no law that accounts for the shot mentioned above.

 

This is getting silly. You can hit push fades, push draws, pull draws, pull fades that finish somewhere between the start line and the target.

post #32 of 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scots Golf View Post

If the ball curved to the right finishing at point B though when the target was E.
I read the article that chart comes from and the author states that shot type C and G both finish on target. As I suggested there is no law that accounts for the shot mentioned above.

 

 

then the ball didn't curve enough for your pull fade. This isn't strictly, its just showing the different ball flights, though there are magnitudes of variations with in the parameters for each flight. You can have different degrees of a push draw. Look at PGA tour players. They don't all hit the same push draw, yet they are all still push draws. 

post #33 of 34
Sniff...sniff...
post #34 of 34

We are getting off track by this pointless lawyering of the question....waste of time.

I can't think of anything other than those nine shots.  But would like to know.

 

(other than shanks, tops, skulls, etc - and it was clear we also aren't talking about those)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scots Golf View Post

Here's a teaser on ball flights. What are the two ball flights that do not have a name. I.e there are 2 shots you can hit that do not come under one of the 9 ball flights described.

 

I'll try - would putting (that tiny bit of flight right after contact) or punch shots count?  or is that just another tangent?  even those have face angle and club path components......as do chips, knockdowns and pitches....

 

 

Certainly there are knuckleball type flights and weird shots where the ball rotates on the third axis and the result is more of a corkscrew flight......but I don't think that's in the spirit of the discussion either.....

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