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How to Move a Beginner to the Course - Page 4

post #55 of 67

My 10 rules for beginners in no particular order:

 

1. keep away from prime-time golf on championship courses

2. par3, exec, and 9 courses are recommended

3. don't keep score.....enjoy the experience

4. Keep up with the group in front of you

5. ignore the group behind you...if you are keeping up, those following are not relevant.

6. Keep up

7. Stone Canyon Golf Club in Missouri is off limits

8. learn proper golf etiquette and you will be welcome in any group providing you don't hold them up.

9. don't fall behind the group you are following

10. Do Maintain pace with the group you are following

 

 

simple rules....

post #56 of 67

I would say the most "important" is proper etiquette. As a conservative college student, I spend more times on the course than at the house parties. This means I play as a single a lot, and consequently, get paired up with random people or groups. I have noticed a decline in "proper" etiquette. The very first time I ever went golfing, to a friend's dad's very nice, very expensive country club. I was taught immediately to hold my tongue and respect on the course. It seems more and more people I play with throw their clubs, curse excessively loudly, slam clubs, hit the club on the ground taking a large divot, picking up others balls when they are in play, holding the flag stick casting a shadow in my line, stepping in my line, not filling large divots with sand, not raking sand bunkers after you hit, etc. I know it's a little old fashioned, but I always perceived this game as a gentleman's game with class. Tuck in your shirt, say sir, and be respectful of others and the course. Others going out there throwing your equipment, whining and complaining and cursing just bring my game down and create a negative environment.

post #57 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbrock504 View Post
 

I would say the most "important" is proper etiquette. As a conservative college student, I spend more times on the course than at the house parties. This means I play as a single a lot, and consequently, get paired up with random people or groups. I have noticed a decline in "proper" etiquette. The very first time I ever went golfing, to a friend's dad's very nice, very expensive country club. I was taught immediately to hold my tongue and respect on the course. It seems more and more people I play with throw their clubs, curse excessively loudly, slam clubs, hit the club on the ground taking a large divot, picking up others balls when they are in play, holding the flag stick casting a shadow in my line, stepping in my line, not filling large divots with sand, not raking sand bunkers after you hit, etc. I know it's a little old fashioned, but I always perceived this game as a gentleman's game with class. Tuck in your shirt, say sir, and be respectful of others and the course. Others going out there throwing your equipment, whining and complaining and cursing just bring my game down and create a negative environment.

Honestly, I feel like this is simply acting like a normal human being. Be a well-behaved regular person at the golf course.

 

Yell fore, rake bunkers, fix divots, fix green hits, don't talk noises when others are hitting etc...

 

The only complaint that you can make against me, from those which you listed above is the "dress code of golf"

 

Often times the weather is really crappy in my country, especially during this spring. Today weather was gloomy, rain and dark clouds, lots of wind.

 

I will not ruin my good slacks pants and good shirts on the golf course, for the sake of golf dress etiquette.

 

I'd rather take the complaints, and wear cheap sweaters and cheap pants. AND feel comfortable and warm during my golf swings.

 

But that's just me, a beginner golfer. You should always (try to) dress according to the weather, when being outside, in my opinion.

 

If ya don't dress according to weather, there is only you yourself to blame for that.

 

Practical clothing > golf clothing, I say. Then again, I only play at cheap low-end beginner's golf course. Which is not exactly "posh" golf club for pros and businessmen etc....

post #58 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbrock504 View Post
 

I would say the most "important" is proper etiquette. As a conservative college student, I spend more times on the course than at the house parties. This means I play as a single a lot, and consequently, get paired up with random people or groups. I have noticed a decline in "proper" etiquette. The very first time I ever went golfing, to a friend's dad's very nice, very expensive country club. I was taught immediately to hold my tongue and respect on the course. It seems more and more people I play with throw their clubs, curse excessively loudly, slam clubs, hit the club on the ground taking a large divot, picking up others balls when they are in play, holding the flag stick casting a shadow in my line, stepping in my line, not filling large divots with sand, not raking sand bunkers after you hit, etc. I know it's a little old fashioned, but I always perceived this game as a gentleman's game with class. Tuck in your shirt, say sir, and be respectful of others and the course. Others going out there throwing your equipment, whining and complaining and cursing just bring my game down and create a negative environment.

Well said dbrock504. As a course marshal, I agree that there is a marked decline in etiquette particularly in regards to treatment of the course. There seems to be an ethic developing that says, "I paid my green fee and I will treat the course as I see fit." That means no fixing divots, no raking of bunkers, and no fixing ball marks for the following players. To me, this is totally against the traditions and etiquette of the game, and frankly, I find it to be totally inconsiderate. As to behaviour on the course…I am now of an age (grumpy enough) to tell any player I am partnered with who throws a club that "That is the last club you will throw today…are we clear!?" If people are not told what is and what isn't acceptable behaviour then how are they to learn? I am not going to have my day spoiled because of other people's bad behaviour. The game is hard enough without that crap. Thanks for the comment.

post #59 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by late347 View Post
 

Honestly, I feel like this is simply acting like a normal human being. Be a well-behaved regular person at the golf course.

 

Yell fore, rake bunkers, fix divots, fix green hits, don't talk noises when others are hitting etc...

 

The only complaint that you can make against me, from those which you listed above is the "dress code of golf"

 

Often times the weather is really crappy in my country, especially during this spring. Today weather was gloomy, rain and dark clouds, lots of wind.

 

I will not ruin my good slacks pants and good shirts on the golf course, for the sake of golf dress etiquette.

 

I'd rather take the complaints, and wear cheap sweaters and cheap pants. AND feel comfortable and warm during my golf swings.

 

But that's just me, a beginner golfer. You should always (try to) dress according to the weather, when being outside, in my opinion.

 

If ya don't dress according to weather, there is only you yourself to blame for that.

 

Practical clothing > golf clothing, I say. Then again, I only play at cheap low-end beginner's golf course. Which is not exactly "posh" golf club for pros and businessmen etc....


Don't misunderstand "cheap" with improper. You can find a collared shirt, belt and tan pants relatively cheap. You don't need to buy Callaway or Titleist brand clothing. Tuck in the shirt, and whala, proper attire. Improper dress would be t-shirt, jeans and tennis shoes. You sound like you are respecting the game and the dress code.

post #60 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

I read somewhere the other day that new golfers should take "five or six lessons, at least" before they ever step foot on the golf course.

 

I was like… WHAAAAAAAAA?

 

But that begs the question: how do you take a beginner from being a beginner to getting them on the golf course? How does your plan change if you don't have a local executive course that can serve as an intermediate "first step"?

Golf is just one of those sports where lessons can be a good check against developing, and then reinforcing, bad habits -- but initial lessons need to be followed by several visits to the range to practice what you learned, followed by quick followup to make sure you learned it properly.

 

I would up early in my golf learning journey spending lots of time at the range, because i didn't really take enough lessons at the right times....so I was perpetuating mistakes that hindered my consistency, and kept me from the course because I was spraying the ball around. Well timed follow up lessons — that extra set of eyes — would have been much more time-effective.

 

After that ... you can progress to treating about 50% of your range time as target practice and maybe 50% technique (the amount can vary greatly depending on what you need to work on) — where you don't focus on technique but solely on aiming for your targets _ a variety of targets _ and swinging with almost no other thought. After you've zeroed in on your target, all further thoughts are mostly just prepping to let your subconscious take over and control the rest of the process.

 

By devoting plenty of time to hitting "targets", real or imaginary, out on the practice range, you are essentially preparing yourself for moving to the course.  

post #61 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbrock504 View Post


Don't misunderstand "cheap" with improper. You can find a collared shirt, belt and tan pants relatively cheap. You don't need to buy Callaway or Titleist brand clothing. Tuck in the shirt, and whala, proper attire. Improper dress would be t-shirt, jeans and tennis shoes. You sound like you are respecting the game and the dress code.

eh, to be perfectly honest. I dont dress for a job interview when I dress for golf. Sue me.

Golf is a sport after all. I want to be comfortable and effective in my golfing clothing. Who wouldnt want to be?

Im not at the golf course to pick-up chicks either. I mean, i understand how companies may require job uniforms and that type of thing. But in my free time, i like to feel, well more free.

I'm not going to expose my buttcrack though. Which seeems to be the pants-wearing style for certain youngsterrs. And, i do have golfing shoes finally, hehe.
post #62 of 67

There was a time that if I heard someone mention dress code and golf that I would have laughed out loud.  Today that was about 5 minutes ago...

post #63 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by seagullplayer View Post
 

There was a time that if I heard someone mention dress code and golf that I would have laughed out loud.  Today that was about 5 minutes ago...

I don't get it. You do, or you don't, agree with dressing appropriately on the course?

 

I'm definitely not "that guy", but I can't help but laugh hysterically when I see a guy in denim (particularly above-the-knee jorts) and t-shirts. That's being blunt, but that's how I feel on the topic. I'm also not the guy that wakes up without a shower, throws on some sweatpants and goes on about my day running errands in public either.

Dressing appropriately isn't costly. Go to any online golf retailer and you'll find polos and shorts/pants for very good prices. Hell, you can buy 1 pair of pants, 1 polo and 1 pair of shorts that you designate as "golf only clothes" for $30-60 tops.

:offtopic: 

 

I do think teaching a beginner appropriate dress and code of conduct is important. I'd rather show up to a course knowing that I'm dressed appropriately regardless of which course it is, rather than look up at a sign that says "No Denim, T-Shirts, etc." on their Dress Code sign and feel uncomfortable in jeans.

Back on topic...

post #64 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by late347 View Post


eh, to be perfectly honest. I dont dress for a job interview when I dress for golf. Sue me.

Golf is a sport after all. I want to be comfortable and effective in my golfing clothing. Who wouldnt want to be?

Im not at the golf course to pick-up chicks either. I mean, i understand how companies may require job uniforms and that type of thing. But in my free time, i like to feel, well more free.

I'm not going to expose my buttcrack though. Which seeems to be the pants-wearing style for certain youngsterrs. And, i do have golfing shoes finally, hehe.


@late347 I find that khaki shorts, tucked in Nike Dri-fit shirt, Addidas Tour 360 shoes, and a belt are more than comfortable. I play in TX where it's always super hot, so I don't want to hear any excuses about weather. In the winter, I wear a pull over jacket, khaki or grey pants. My golfing attire is very comfortable. Respect the game. Have some pride. Comb your hair, shave, tuck in your shirt. It's really not hard. It has nothing to do with "picking up chicks" or "dressing for a job interview". It's a gentleman's game. I'm not saying you should wear a suit and tie like they did in the 1920's. A collard shirt tucked into some khaki shorts with golf shoes while being properly groomed is all I ask.

post #65 of 67
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbrock504 View Post
 


@late347 I find that khaki shorts, tucked in Nike Dri-fit shirt, Addidas Tour 360 shoes, and a belt are more than comfortable. I play in TX where it's always super hot, so I don't want to hear any excuses about weather. In the winter, I wear a pull over jacket, khaki or grey pants. My golfing attire is very comfortable. Respect the game. Have some pride. Comb your hair, shave, tuck in your shirt. It's really not hard. It has nothing to do with "picking up chicks" or "dressing for a job interview". It's a gentleman's game. I'm not saying you should wear a suit and tie like they did in the 1920's. A collard shirt tucked into some khaki shorts with golf shoes while being properly groomed is all I ask.

 

I'm going golfing today in

 

-khaki cargo pants (they're comfortable, and many pockets!)

 

-nice belt

 

-golf shoes

 

-baseball cap

 

-collared shirt, the fabric is actually pure cotton though so it feels like a t-shirt, but it looks proper and looks like a collared shirt, without actually being one. Good buy I say.

 

 

 

More comfortable that way in my opinion :D

 

You spurred me to buy some new clothes btw. But still I'm going to wear those cargo pants because the fit me better just now. I'm still working on losing a lot of weight. I got a little bit fatty thighs, so I have to use comfortable pants when golfing. :(

post #66 of 67
I tell new golfers no denim ... Collared shirts ... Done ...

Be respectful of other players ...

Treat the course as if you had to maintain it ...

Tee forward ...

Keep up ...

Play cheap used balls and drop often ...

If you nail a house, drop on other side of fairway ... (Angry home owners break next shot concentration). a2_wink.gif

In my group we play ready golf ... So be ready!

Enjoy ...
post #67 of 67

Dress codes really depend on the course. I generally wear standard stuff, but we have a few courses out this way where t-shirts and jeans are actually more appropriate than the standard garb. 

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