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Let's Talk about growing a good Lawn - Page 4

post #55 of 70

do you have alot of shade? when you did the test did you give samples from multiple ares?

post #56 of 70
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wils5150 View Post
 

do you have alot of shade? when you did the test did you give samples from multiple ares?

Decent amount of shade.  I took samples from several areas in back and front yard.

post #57 of 70

shade will help moss grow. did you take samples from where the moss is?

post #58 of 70
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wils5150 View Post
 

shade will help moss grow. did you take samples from where the moss is?

yes, I did.  So instead of killing the whole lawn and starting over, couldn't I start by trimming some limbs, cutting down a couple small trees that are providing shade, fertilizing and over seeding the hell out of my lawn in the next week or two?  

post #59 of 70

do the tree work it will only help. its tough to say with out seeing it. if you have alot of weeds you need to get rid of them. also how good of a lawn do you want?

post #60 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by wils5150 View Post
 


all your numbers look good. go with a starter fert like they say above. I would also suggest getting some siduron.(this is the only pre emergnce weed control that you can seed into. ask where you buy your fert about it. everybody says add lime even though they have no idea what the ph is lol.

I can understand why many people would assume the PH is low, depending on where they live.

 

In north Missouri you could almost tell just by driving past somebody's land if it had been limed or not because the PH was always low. If it hadn't been you could count on having to add it. Without it everything else was a waste of time and money.

 

One plus up there was that every small town had an ag coop and lime trucks so getting lime spread wasn't a hassle at all, unless the ground was wet.

Nothing much can match a loaded lime truck for making ruts. :-D 

 

Around here it's very unusual to even see anybody putting lime out on their pastures (or yards) and you certainly can't make an assumption by looking that it needs it. More typical around here is to spread chicken litter and nothing else. You clearly know from a mile away when a neighbor is spreading litter.

 

Sounds like the OP may just have a shade and/or aeration problem and possibly a lack of organic material in the dirt if it's packed. All he may need is a chain saw, few tons of chicken litter, a nose plug and some grass seed to have all of the grass he wants. (Just joking).

post #61 of 70
Thread Starter 

Ok. So now we know my soil is fine, but I need to trim some limbs and cut down a tree.  I have a lot of moss in my yard, and some completely bare spots.

 

Today is May 7th.  What should my action steps be starting ASAP?

post #62 of 70

You need to get rid of the moss and any weeds you have. then depending how much good grass you have left will determine if you can over seed or have to completely renovate.

post #63 of 70

Just had a brand new lawn sodded.  I live in a neighborhood that has a problem with rabbits.  It's always very easy to find a rabbit grazing on somebody's front lawn.  Some are in a lot worse shape than others.

 

Besides sitting on my front stoop with a BB or paintball gun, does anybody have any suggestions on things that might deter (and also what attracts them) them from choosing my lawn to eat up?

post #64 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

Just had a brand new lawn sodded.  I live in a neighborhood that has a problem with rabbits.  It's always very easy to find a rabbit grazing on somebody's front lawn.  Some are in a lot worse shape than others.

 

Besides sitting on my front stoop with a BB or paintball gun, does anybody have any suggestions on things that might deter (and also what attracts them) them from choosing my lawn to eat up?

 

http://www.arborscapeservices.com/how-to-keep-rabbits-from-eating-your-plants/

 

Quoted from within:

Quote:
 Rabbits will eat grass and regurgitate it onto the lawn. This leftover product is very acidic, and can easily burn out patches of grass.  In fact,  the rabbit will return to the same spot up to three times and repeat the same process.

 

Our rabbit and coyote problem went away when the peacocks in out neighborhood took over everything. . . peacocks are very territorial and chase things away. They are deterred by cinnamon sticks. This can get pretty expensive, so we just live with them and their pea-chicks.

post #65 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

 

http://www.arborscapeservices.com/how-to-keep-rabbits-from-eating-your-plants/

 

Quoted from within:

 

Our rabbit and coyote problem went away when the peacocks in out neighborhood took over everything. . . peacocks are very territorial and chase things away. They are deterred by cinnamon sticks. This can get pretty expensive, so we just live with them and their pea-chicks.

Cool, thanks.  I may try one of these out.  I've already installed a fence along the back fence of our rear yard (there is a decent size open space back there and I know they could get in through the back) but they come from everywhere so I don't expect that to solve the problem.  They'll come from behind the neighbors across the street into our front yard.

 

Hopefully, they'll leave our yard alone for awhile at least. It looks really nice right now. ;)

post #66 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

Cool, thanks.  I may try one of these out.  I've already installed a fence along the back fence of our rear yard (there is a decent size open space back there and I know they could get in through the back) but they come from everywhere so I don't expect that to solve the problem.  They'll come from behind the neighbors across the street into our front yard.

 

Hopefully, they'll leave our yard alone for awhile at least. It looks really nice right now. ;)

 

Good luck getting keeping them out. They can be pretty troublesome.

post #67 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

Just had a brand new lawn sodded.  I live in a neighborhood that has a problem with rabbits.  It's always very easy to find a rabbit grazing on somebody's front lawn.  Some are in a lot worse shape than others.

Those must be the rabbits that drink too much...

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

Just had a brand new lawn sodded.  I live in a neighborhood that has a problem with rabbits.  It's always very easy to find a rabbit grazing on somebody's front lawn.  Some are in a lot worse shape than others.

 

Besides sitting on my front stoop with a BB or paintball gun, does anybody have any suggestions on things that might deter (and also what attracts them) them from choosing my lawn to eat up?

 

You could try urinating all over your lawn.

post #68 of 70
OP I have a lot of moss, we actually cultivate it on our trails and paths. Generally its on top of a soil that is quite hard and impenetrable by deeper rooting plants like grasses. The soil is typically devoid of carbon, which is related to your cation exchange rate, and ability to hold moisture, and the nutrient exchange process, which involves humates in your soil. Consider the organics in your soil to be the carburation on your engine, a metering supply device not the fuel itself. Adams Earth is a product example. Vermiculite and other materials like peat moss contain humates naturally. Anyway, low organics in your soil are good for moss, and make you till in something like vermiculite or aerate a lot and dust in peat moss over some years time.
post #69 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

Those must be the rabbits that drink too much...

LMAO.

 

I suspect some of them of being tweakers as well.  Some very unsavory characters around here.  All they do is **** and eat, **** and eat, **** and eat.

 

Where's Elmer Fudd when you need him?

post #70 of 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ernest Jones View Post
 

Those must be the rabbits that drink too much...

LMAO.

 

I suspect some of them of being tweakers as well.  Some very unsavory characters around here.  All they do is **** and eat, **** and eat, **** and eat.

 

Where's Elmer Fudd when you need him?

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