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REALLY Need Putting Help 10 GIRs and not a single Par - Page 6

post #91 of 143
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 
  1. Record your putting stroke from a few angles.
  2. Put it in your My Swing thread.
  3. Link to that post here.

http://thesandtrap.com/t/74345/my-swing-achadha7

 

hope this is how it's supposed to be

post #92 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by achadha7 View Post
 

http://thesandtrap.com/t/74345/my-swing-achadha7

 

hope this is how it's supposed to be


Thank you for adding that.

 

Here are 3 things I suggest to you:

1) slow down- I don't understand why some people take 30 seconds on the tee box to hit but 5 seconds to putt. Stand back, look at the green, think about your ball placement and speed, take 2-3 practice strokes, then address the ball. It seemed like you rushed a lot. I take twice that amount of time on the greens, if not more.

 

2) stroke- It looks like you actually have a good swing fundamentally (elbows, wrists and stance). However, I noticed some strokes were quicker than others. That is a no-no. You define how far you are going to hit by how far you take your back swing. Remember: Your follow through will be the same distance as your back swing. So example: 2 ft putt- take the putter back 6 inches, go forward 6 inches. 20 ft putt- take club back 18 inches, go forward 18 inches. All the while keeping a consistent tempo in the swing. The speed of your swing from a 2 ft putt and a 20 ft putt should remain the same. Do NOT speed up as you were doing. This creates all the inconsistencies you are having.

 

3) practice-  quit playing so much and start practicing on the practice greens to understand how to play break and speed on down hills and up hills. It just seems as if you don't have enough experience to understand how the greens will break. From seeing you line up in the video, I could immediately tell you were lined up for a straight putt when it had a 3 cup break to the right. That just comes with time and experience.

post #93 of 143
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbrock504 View Post
 


Thank you for adding that. It looks like you actually have a good swing. You simply aren't reading the greens properly and your distance control is bad. The only thing I can suggest is quit playing so much and start practicing on the practice greens to understand how to play break and control your speed. I'm sure Erik can find a flaw to help you fundamentally, but I saw nothing that needed fixing immediately. Like I said in my previous post, the thing that separates a good putter from a great putter is the ability to read greens. It just seems as if you don't have enough experience to understand how the greens will break. Also, slow down. I don't understand why some people take 30 seconds on the tee box to hit but 5 seconds to putt. Stand back, look at the green, think about your ball placement and speed, take 2-3 practice strokes, then address the ball. It seemed like you rushed a lot. I take twice that amount of time on the greens, if not more.

Thanks, distance i know is an issue for me. As for the time thing,,,, couple of things,.... the filming started after the practise swings and lining up the ball with the line I wanted. but thanks :) 

post #94 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by achadha7 View Post
 

Thanks, distance i know is an issue for me. As for the time thing,,,, couple of things,.... the filming started after the practise swings and lining up the ball with the line I wanted. but thanks :) 


Please read my response again. I needed to edit it. I did not convey my thoughts properly the first time. Sorry.

post #95 of 143
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbrock504 View Post
 


Please read my response again. I needed to edit it. I did not convey my thoughts properly the first time. Sorry.

Thanks :) will keep that in mind.

Point 3, lining up for what hole ? 8,9,10 or 11 ?

post #96 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by achadha7 View Post
 

Thanks :) will keep that in mind.

Point 3, lining up for what hole ? 8,9,10 or 11 ?


The first video, hole 10. You set up properly for the next video, but it seemed like you may have pulled it just a smidge. If not, maybe you just read too much break. That happens. That wasn't a bad putt. Good speed.

post #97 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golfingdad View Post
 

That's the other baffling thing ... 10 GIR is really, really good.  I have 4 or 5 rounds in the last year that stand out to me (2, 3 or 4 over par) and in only one of them did I hit 10 greens.  The other 3 include 8, 8, and 9 GIR.

 

I can't fathom how somebody good enough to hit 10 GIR could average 3.22 putts per hole, no matter how little time is spent on the practice green.  (It's almost physically impossible to practice putting less often than I do)

 

I do understand how your putting stats will go down a little bit with more GIR, because you're going to usually be further from the hole.  But take a couple of one-putts and make them 3-putts and you should still have very little trouble staying south of 40.

 

Yeah.  And even 6 GIR average should easily be playing in the 80s, with the good days (10 GIR!) below 80!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

Soft wrists. Actually prefer to see them "float load" a little bit, and soft wrists can tap in to your feel. If I ask you to lob a ball to me, you wouldn't do it with stiff locked wrists.

 

I commented in his my swing thread about the putting stroke itself now that we can see it.  But I'll note here that one thing that's really helped me get this soft wrists thing and increase my feel and improve my distance control is the feel that it was reported Stricker helped Tiger with last year.  That feel was to imagine the putter as a long paint brush and feel like you're trying to softly and smoothly brush a stroke of paint centered on the ball.  You don't want any Jackson Pollock splatters or dollops from whipping or pushing or jabbing.  The way to make a soft, even, not too heavy brush stroke without splatters or dollops is basically a smooth pendulum action with soft wrists, at least for me. 

post #98 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdl View Post
 

 

Yeah.  And even 6 GIR average should easily be playing in the 80s, with the good days (10 GIR!) below 80!

 

 

I commented in his my swing thread about the putting stroke itself now that we can see it.  But I'll note here that one thing that's really helped me get this soft wrists thing and increase my feel and improve my distance control is the feel that it was reported Stricker helped Tiger with last year.  That feel was to imagine the putter as a long paint brush and feel like you're trying to softly and smoothly brush a stroke of paint centered on the ball.  You don't want any Jackson Pollock splatters or dollops from whipping or pushing or jabbing.  The way to make a soft, even, not too heavy brush stroke without splatters or dollops is basically a smooth pendulum action with soft wrists, at least for me. 

 

Aaaaaaalmost there. Just. . .a. . .few. . .less mistakes. . .on. . .the. . .other. . .holes. . . Plus, I object to the word "easily". :-P:-$

 

Agreed about the soft wrists, I think almost every person that's tried to teach me putting has mentioned soft wrists.

 

@dbrock504 brought up some really good points about taking your time with the putts. I also rush those too much, and need to spend way more time with them.

post #99 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

 

@dbrock504 brought up some really good points about taking your time with the putts. I also rush those too much, and need to spend way more time with them.

 

Funny, but more time needs specification for me.  Sure, you don't want to feel nervous/negative/stiff and not bother taking much of a read and just step up and jab at it.  I take my read and do a few practice strokes concentrating on the brush feel, not specifically the distance I'm trying to hit it.  So that could be part of taking enough time, getting relaxed and focused.  But my most important thought aside from the brush feel is just to remember NOT to take too much time over the putt, or even next to the putt.

 

If I look up at my aim point and shuffle and think about the putt for a long time once I set up, I invariably putt worse.  On bad putting days, one of the things that often helps me break out of it is to concentrate on a quick putt.  Take my normal routine for the read and the away from the ball practice brushes, but then step up to the ball, one quick look at my aim point, and GO!  Helps me reduce thoughts, stay soft, and not try to guide it.  

post #100 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbrock504 View Post
 


Thank you for adding that.

 

Here are 3 things I suggest to you:

1) slow down- I don't understand why some people take 30 seconds on the tee box to hit but 5 seconds to putt. Stand back, look at the green, think about your ball placement and speed, take 2-3 practice strokes, then address the ball. It seemed like you rushed a lot. I take twice that amount of time on the greens, if not more.

 

2) stroke- It looks like you actually have a good swing fundamentally (elbows, wrists and stance). However, I noticed some strokes were quicker than others. That is a no-no. You define how far you are going to hit by how far you take your back swing. Remember: Your follow through will be the same distance as your back swing. So example: 2 ft putt- take the putter back 6 inches, go forward 6 inches. 20 ft putt- take club back 18 inches, go forward 18 inches. All the while keeping a consistent tempo in the swing. The speed of your swing from a 2 ft putt and a 20 ft putt should remain the same. Do NOT speed up as you were doing. This creates all the inconsistencies you are having.

 

3) practice-  quit playing so much and start practicing on the practice greens to understand how to play break and speed on down hills and up hills. It just seems as if you don't have enough experience to understand how the greens will break. From seeing you line up in the video, I could immediately tell you were lined up for a straight putt when it had a 3 cup break to the right. That just comes with time and experience.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdl View Post
 

 

Funny, but more time needs specification for me.  Sure, you don't want to feel nervous/negative/stiff and not bother taking much of a read and just step up and jab at it.  I take my read and do a few practice strokes concentrating on the brush feel, not specifically the distance I'm trying to hit it.  So that could be part of taking enough time, getting relaxed and focused.  But my most important thought aside from the brush feel is just to remember NOT to take too much time over the putt, or even next to the putt.

 

If I look up at my aim point and shuffle and think about the putt for a long time once I set up, I invariably putt worse.  On bad putting days, one of the things that often helps me break out of it is to concentrate on a quick putt.  Take my normal routine for the read and the away from the ball practice brushes, but then step up to the ball, one quick look at my aim point, and GO!  Helps me reduce thoughts, stay soft, and not try to guide it.  


Glad I can make you laugh...? To elaborate for you, I agree with you that you don't want to take too long assessing the issue because then you begin to get nervous as said. However, I see too many people (my dad) literally walk up on the putt and hit it. I would say a comfortable time would be about 20-30 actual seconds. That is about 10 seconds to look at the green and assess your speed and placement, 5 seconds to take 2 practice brushing feel as you mentioned, then address the ball, set your feet, check the target, check putter face alignment, check target. begin stroke (10 seconds). That is my routine. 20-30 seconds is not a long time, nor is it "step up to the ball, one quick look and GO!". However, if it works for you, it works for you. No arguing there. You seem to be a great player, so I am in no way shape or form telling you your way is wrong. I am just the opposite about having bad days. My bad days are because I become impatient and just walk up there and hit, not paying attention to what I'm doing because I'm so concerned with that crap drive I hit 3 shots back or that last par 4 I just 3 putt on. As I mentioned before, there is more than ONE way to play this game. Find what works for you

post #101 of 143

Depends on the golfer. I know two very good putters who take less than 10 seconds per putt. I know a guy who is pretty good and he takes FOREVER!!!

 

I would say @achadha7 does need to slow down after making a bad miss. It looks like he gets a bit fired up there. I would recommend, if it isn't a tap in, then do the same routine every time. I also recommend spending time on distance control. Just throw down a club on the putting green and pace off 15 feet and get good at getting the balls to stop just at the club. You can try this at different increments. Get your mind off the hole, and more on getting good distance control. No way you should be leaving putts more than 5 feet short on what looks like a 20-25 foot putt. 

post #102 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbrock504 View Post
 

 However, I see too many people (my dad) literally walk up on the putt and hit it.

 

I don't see very many bad putters do this, but I agree that doesn't seem the optimal approach.  I say bad putters cause if you hit 28 putts per round with that approach, then I sure as hell ain't critiquing your routine!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by dbrock504 View Post 
 
 I would say a comfortable time would be about 20-30 actual seconds. That is about 10 seconds to look at the green and assess your speed and placement, 5 seconds to take 2 practice brushing feel as you mentioned, then address the ball, set your feet, check the target, check putter face alignment, check target. begin stroke (10 seconds). That is my routine. 20-30 seconds is not a long time, nor is it "step up to the ball, one quick look and GO!". However, if it works for you, it works for you. No arguing there. 

 

I'd bet we have similar total routine times (though as an advocate for speed of play I always try to get as much of that read/assessment done as possible before it's my turn to hit).  What I mean by step up, quick look, and go, is that if I do the bolded part I too often get stuck in that cycle, looking back at my aim point, shuffling, thinking, rechecking my alignment, relooking at my aim point...  Then I get tight and bang it by, start questioning my alignment and hit a push or pull when my alignment was fine, etc.  For me I do better letting my practice and athletic ability take over and not overthinking it if I minimize the time over the ball.

 

Quote:
 Originally Posted by dbrock504 View Post
 
You seem to be a great player

 

Haha.  I'm FAR from that!  I can hit a few good shots here and there, even put together good rounds once in a while, but I'm far from great.

post #103 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdl View Post
 

 

I don't see very many bad putters do this, but I agree that doesn't seem the optimal approach.  I say bad putters cause if you hit 28 putts per round with that approach, then I sure as hell ain't critiquing your routine!

 

 

I'd bet we have similar total routine times (though as an advocate for speed of play I always try to get as much of that read/assessment done as possible before it's my turn to hit).  What I mean by step up, quick look, and go, is that if I do the bolded part I too often get stuck in that cycle, looking back at my aim point, shuffling, thinking, rechecking my alignment, relooking at my aim point...  Then I get tight and bang it by, start questioning my alignment and hit a push or pull when my alignment was fine, etc.  For me I do better letting my practice and athletic ability take over and not overthinking it if I minimize the time over the ball.

 

 

Haha.  I'm FAR from that!  I can hit a few good shots here and there, even put together good rounds once in a while, but I'm far from great.


Very valid points. And get outta here! You're a single digit hcp. I haven't had my hcp calculated in a while, but I bet it's no where near 9. It's probably around 17? Anyone who can shoot in the 80's I call a good player.

post #104 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbrock504 View Post
 


Very valid points. And get outta here! You're a single digit hcp. I haven't had my hcp calculated in a while, but I bet it's no where near 9. It's probably around 17? Anyone who can shoot in the 80's I call a good player.

 

I agree with this with one minor adjustment, he shoots in the low-80s and high-70s.

post #105 of 143
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

Depends on the golfer. I know two very good putters who take less than 10 seconds per putt. I know a guy who is pretty good and he takes FOREVER!!!

 

I would say @achadha7 does need to slow down after making a bad miss. It looks like he gets a bit fired up there. I would recommend, if it isn't a tap in, then do the same routine every time. I also recommend spending time on distance control. Just throw down a club on the putting green and pace off 15 feet and get good at getting the balls to stop just at the club. You can try this at different increments. Get your mind off the hole, and more on getting good distance control. No way you should be leaving putts more than 5 feet short on what looks like a 20-25 foot putt. 

DISTANCE DISTANCE DISTANCE. but will work on it. i do get fired up on mussing easy putts esp when its for par or birdie.....

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdl View Post
 

 

I don't see very many bad putters do this, but I agree that doesn't seem the optimal approach.  I say bad putters cause if you hit 28 putts per round with that approach, then I sure as hell ain't critiquing your routine!

 

 

I'd bet we have similar total routine times (though as an advocate for speed of play I always try to get as much of that read/assessment done as possible before it's my turn to hit).  What I mean by step up, quick look, and go, is that if I do the bolded part I too often get stuck in that cycle, looking back at my aim point, shuffling, thinking, rechecking my alignment, relooking at my aim point...  Then I get tight and bang it by, start questioning my alignment and hit a push or pull when my alignment was fine, etc.  For me I do better letting my practice and athletic ability take over and not overthinking it if I minimize the time over the ball.

 

 

Haha.  I'm FAR from that!  I can hit a few good shots here and there, even put together good rounds once in a while, but I'm far from great.

the thing i did different this round was just minimize the time over the ball(55 putts to 45). read the green / break, get on the ball align, aim and putt, the longer i stand over the ball the more still nervous etc i get .... just the same thing as in the bolded part. will practise some distance control today and maybe play another round... time and weather permitting.

post #106 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by achadha7 View Post
 

DISTANCE DISTANCE DISTANCE. but will work on it. i do get fired up on mussing easy putts esp when its for par or birdie.....

 

the thing i did different this round was just minimize the time over the ball(55 putts to 45). read the green / break, get on the ball align, aim and putt, the longer i stand over the ball the more still nervous etc i get .... just the same thing as in the bolded part. will practise some distance control today and maybe play another round... time and weather permitting.

 

I still tend to think that you are probably too tense when putting. 45 putts is still a lot of putts. I'm no putter and 48 was from my absolute worst round.

post #107 of 143
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

 

I still tend to think that you are probably too tense when putting. 45 putts is still a lot of putts. I'm no putter and 48 was from my absolute worst round.

Yup i am and yes it is :) i wanna get down to 36 putts a round... i can be shooting mid 80's but the distance control advice i will practise along with the other....

post #108 of 143
Quote:
Originally Posted by achadha7 View Post
 

DISTANCE DISTANCE DISTANCE. but will work on it. i do get fired up on mussing easy putts esp when its for par or birdie.....

 

the thing i did different this round was just minimize the time over the ball(55 putts to 45). read the green / break, get on the ball align, aim and putt, the longer i stand over the ball the more still nervous etc i get .... just the same thing as in the bolded part. will practise some distance control today and maybe play another round... time and weather permitting.

@achadha7 ,

 

This may contribute to your missed putts. Try to breathe slow a deep when reading your putt and when you get in your stance. Let the tension go out of your body.  Focus only on the line and speed in your head, nothing else.  It really does not matter if you make the putt or not.  Life goes on.  You Mother still loves you whether you miss the putt or make it!  When you relax this way, you will get more consistent with your stroke and it will help you game overall.

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