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Need 9 degree Driver Help!!

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Some of you know I just got a 9 degree driver.  My Ping 10.5 just seemed to sky too much.  I had about 10 crushing, straight, solid drives that went about 280 today with my 9 degree.  Problem is that I hit about 60 balls.  Most went about 1000 yds to the right.

 

What is up with that??  That is why I ask the previous question about how far I should be from the ball at address.

 

The Ping is weighted to help people with a slice to get around on the ball.  The new driver is not specially weighted.  Any idea on how to adjust to the 9 degree better?  I do not want to change to an improper stance to compensate.

 

Thanks.

post #2 of 23
Quote:

Originally Posted by Always an 80 View Post

 

 Most went about 1000 yds to the right.

 

 

 

Aim left....voila 1,000 yard drives. 

 

Don't really know the answer to your question though but my R11s goes from I think 7.5 to 10.5 and I have messed around with it and my ball flight doesn't change with it just the height difference. 

post #3 of 23

I'll bet you are "overswinging" to try and hit is a mile and validate your selection.  Lighten up try 260 in the middle instead of 280 3 holes over.

 

Why by the way does your 10-1/2 degree go so high?  Angle of attack, are you flipping?  Hitting down on the ball.  What are the spin numbers on both drivers?

post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 

I do not know the spin numbers.  And yes, I may have reverted back to overswinging especially since I recently shortened my backswing.

 

Angle of attack issue probable.  Did not have this issue with the Ping K15.  Another probable...my 9 degree is an actual fitted club.  My Ping came off the rack.  I probably need to seriously work on my set up before the shot.

post #5 of 23

Ya kinda sounds like your swing is too steep, try to flaten it out a little bit, and keep the left wrist flat or even bowed a bit, like DJ does.

 

But you're a single digit handicapper, so you'll figure it out man.

 

What shaft do you have in it, and what is your swing speed?

post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motley01 View Post
 

Ya kinda sounds like your swing is too steep, try to flaten it out a little bit, and keep the left wrist flat or even bowed a bit, like DJ does.

 

But you're a single digit handicapper, so you'll figure it out man.

 

What shaft do you have in it, and what is your swing speed?

Very good idea.  Never thought about the left wrist thing. Thanks!

 

Not single digit this year.  Must change that stat on my profile.  Since I am older I had to change to a "proper" swing in order to get in a round without exhausting myself.  The last two times I went out with the new swing I added about 6 to 8 to my handicap. Sad.  But I feel better after the round.

 

Graphite stiff.  No idea about swing speed now.  Am going to local shop that has state of the art equipment for measuring such things.  I will know technical stuff about my swing by next week.

 

I posit that your idea of my swing being too steep is probably very accurate.

post #7 of 23

I know what you mean about the getting older thing, and being tired after a round. That is exactly me these last few years.

 

Ya the left wrist thing, I've struggled with this alot, I have always had a kinked wrist, and its hard to square the club face. But this year my wrist is flat, and I started hitting the ball really solid now.

post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motley01 View Post
 

I know what you mean about the getting older thing, and being tired after a round. That is exactly me these last few years.

 

Ya the left wrist thing, I've struggled with this alot, I have always had a kinked wrist, and its hard to square the club face. But this year my wrist is flat, and I started hitting the ball really solid now.

The left wrist issue turned out to be extremely important.  I greatly appreciate your mentioning it!  When I changed from my homemade swing to a more proper swing, my teacher did not address the left wrist.  Here is what I found out....Old swing had my wrist such that the head of the club lay flat on its bottom against the ground.  I cocked my wrist so that the heel of the club was against the ground with the toe angled upward.  When  I swung the club the head path followed true and through the ball.  I could not believe it.    Every swing followed the path I had intended!!

 

Such a simple fundamental that I was remiss on.  Thanks again for bringing up the left wrist position.  I cannot wait to play a round to see how this plays out on the course.  

 

If this works out and you are ever in the Evansville area the next round of golf is on me!

post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Always an 80 View Post
 

The left wrist issue turned out to be extremely important.  I greatly appreciate your mentioning it!  When I changed from my homemade swing to a more proper swing, my teacher did not address the left wrist.  Here is what I found out....Old swing had my wrist such that the head of the club lay flat on its bottom against the ground.  I cocked my wrist so that the heel of the club was against the ground with the toe angled upward.  When  I swung the club the head path followed true and through the ball.  I could not believe it.    Every swing followed the path I had intended!!

 

Such a simple fundamental that I was remiss on.  Thanks again for bringing up the left wrist position.  I cannot wait to play a round to see how this plays out on the course.  

 

If this works out and you are ever in the Evansville area the next round of golf is on me!

 

Oh really? Nice! Glad I could be of help, sometimes its just one little thing that can change your swing.

 

I'm taking a road trip out to Indiana now so we can go play!

post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Motley01 View Post
 

 

Oh really? Nice! Glad I could be of help, sometimes its just one little thing that can change your swing.

 

I'm taking a road trip out to Indiana now so we can go play!

My wife and I honeymooned in Estes Park.  We love that area.  I will even pay for a round out there.  Hope your greens fees are not to steep!   Thanks again.

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Always an 80 View Post
 

My wife and I honeymooned in Estes Park.  We love that area.  I will even pay for a round out there.  Hope your greens fees are not to steep!   Thanks again.

 

Oh nice Estes Park is great, but right now they are still recovering from the floods, destroyed the hole town.

 

Green fees here are reasonable, we have some really nice public courses all about $50 - $60 with cart. So come on out here!

post #12 of 23

Something else to keep in mind you will generally have more sidespin issues with a lower loft driver. Your height is more effected by your shaft, especially with the driver. You won't notice much of a height change between a 10.5 and a 9, the shaft is where you wanted to look. You will see more of a curve to the right or left with the lower loft. I made a similar change a few years back for the same reason and it lowered very little, changed the shaft and that completely changed the ball flight.

post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by awmgolfer View Post
 

Something else to keep in mind you will generally have more sidespin issues with a lower loft driver. Your height is more effected by your shaft, especially with the driver. You won't notice much of a height change between a 10.5 and a 9, the shaft is where you wanted to look. You will see more of a curve to the right or left with the lower loft. I made a similar change a few years back for the same reason and it lowered very little, changed the shaft and that completely changed the ball flight.

I can relate to your response.  My Ping is not as stiff as the new 9 degree.  Both are graphite.  The Ping is also weighted, as I mentioned previously, which helps slicers get around on the ball a bit.   The first time out with the new one I saw all kinds of lofts.  Very confusing to me.  When I hit clean I did notice that the height was noticeably lower, but as you mentioned, not a night and day difference.

 

Saw an SLDR ad on T.V. today.  It pitched the idea of lofting up.  I cannot say that I agree, especially since I cannot assay the spin speed issue.   I do understand what you say about the side spin.  Thanks for the input.

post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Always an 80 View Post
 

I can relate to your response.  My Ping is not as stiff as the new 9 degree.  Both are graphite.  The Ping is also weighted, as I mentioned previously, which helps slicers get around on the ball a bit.   The first time out with the new one I saw all kinds of lofts.  Very confusing to me.  When I hit clean I did notice that the height was noticeably lower, but as you mentioned, not a night and day difference.

 

Saw an SLDR ad on T.V. today.  It pitched the idea of lofting up.  I cannot say that I agree, especially since I cannot assay the spin speed issue.   I do understand what you say about the side spin.  Thanks for the input.

 

Side spin doesn't exist. There is only one spin, and it spins on one axis. How much that axis tilts determines the curve of the ball flight. That is determined by the clubface orientation to the swing path. 

 

Yes lofting up works. The reason is the center of gravity is low and forward. This creates a huge gear effect that reduces spin. So what they can do is get you to launch higher at impact, then the ball will flatten out and look like a more boring trajectory. This increases carry and roll. More and more drivers now are able to have very thing crowns of the club and heavier bottoms to move the weight down. SLDR is the only driver that really focused on moving the weight forward as well. 

post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

 

Side spin doesn't exist. There is only one spin, and it spins on one axis. How much that axis tilts determines the curve of the ball flight. That is determined by the clubface orientation to the swing path. 

 

Yes lofting up works. The reason is the center of gravity is low and forward. This creates a huge gear effect that reduces spin. So what they can do is get you to launch higher at impact, then the ball will flatten out and look like a more boring trajectory. This increases carry and roll. More and more drivers now are able to have very thing crowns of the club and heavier bottoms to move the weight down. SLDR is the only driver that really focused on moving the weight forward as well. 

So you are saying that basically there is a countering topspin effect in force?

post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Always an 80 View Post
 

Some of you know I just got a 9 degree driver.  My Ping 10.5 just seemed to sky too much.  I had about 10 crushing, straight, solid drives that went about 280 today with my 9 degree.  Problem is that I hit about 60 balls.  Most went about 1000 yds to the right.

 

What is up with that??  That is why I ask the previous question about how far I should be from the ball at address.

 

The Ping is weighted to help people with a slice to get around on the ball.  The new driver is not specially weighted.  Any idea on how to adjust to the 9 degree better?  I do not want to change to an improper stance to compensate.

 

Thanks.

 

How high is high with the 10.5? I hit pretty high as well, but am starting to consider it a normal drive and not high enough. Having spent the season with really good players teaching my son's team, I realized that all the good players hit really high.  A controlled higher flight, but really high.

 

The height of the driving range nets is not high enough to retain their normal shots.

 

A couple D1 players came to our local range to teach the kids. Their drives basically flew over the net 250 yards away. All of them. BTW, a 52 degree wedge goes 140 yards for them, and the balls go even higher.

 

Now, they can also shape their drives by teeing up lower to get a low penetrating flight as well, but this is only for wind as they explained.

 

High is not a problem from what I have seen.

post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Always an 80 View Post
 

So you are saying that basically there is a countering topspin effect in force?

 

Spin is caused by the loft of the club, and how the face is tilted. Every club produces a gear effect. Meaning, the distance the impact of the ball from the center of gravity reduces the amount of spin, or helps tilt the axis one way or another. Drivers produce more because of the size of the clubface and the bulge of the clubface. 

 

For example, if you take a driver, and you hit it on the toe. The gear effect will help promote more of a draw. It help tilts the axis for a draw effect. This is why toe shots have a better chance of starting right and drawing back. Heel shots are opposite. Thin shots produce more spin, but they launch lower because their is less loft below the center of the clubface. Shots that are hit high on the clubface launch higher but with less spin. It DOESN'T create a countering topspin, it just effects overall spin. 

 

So what the SLDR did was move the center of gravity lower and forward. This basically made nearly the entire clubface into a gear effect to reduce backspin. I'll label it backspin because majority of spin on a driver is in that direction, though it can tilt left or right to produce a fade or draw. 

 

So put it to you this way. I hit a 910 Titleist driver. When I hit it good, in the center with a solid strike, the backspin is near 2900-3100 rpm. When I hit my SLDR driver the same way, its nearly 2000-2100 rpm. 

post #18 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by saevel25 View Post
 

 

Spin is caused by the loft of the club, and how the face is tilted. Every club produces a gear effect. Meaning, the distance the impact of the ball from the center of gravity reduces the amount of spin, or helps tilt the axis one way or another. Drivers produce more because of the size of the clubface and the bulge of the clubface. 

 

For example, if you take a driver, and you hit it on the toe. The gear effect will help promote more of a draw. It help tilts the axis for a draw effect. This is why toe shots have a better chance of starting right and drawing back. Heel shots are opposite. Thin shots produce more spin, but they launch lower because their is less loft below the center of the clubface. Shots that are hit high on the clubface launch higher but with less spin. It DOESN'T create a countering topspin, it just effects overall spin. 

 

So what the SLDR did was move the center of gravity lower and forward. This basically made nearly the entire clubface into a gear effect to reduce backspin. I'll label it backspin because majority of spin on a driver is in that direction, though it can tilt left or right to produce a fade or draw. 

 

So put it to you this way. I hit a 910 Titleist driver. When I hit it good, in the center with a solid strike, the backspin is near 2900-3100 rpm. When I hit my SLDR driver the same way, its nearly 2000-2100 rpm. 

No top spin.  Negation of overall. spin.   Got it.   Thanks.

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