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Martin Kaymer robot joke in Rory Mcilroy video ?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
That joke in the video where the robot saids "losing to a robot is a bit like losing to Martin Kaymer" .... Can explain that joke ? Lol is it his voice or play or I have no idea
post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDStars187 View Post

That joke in the video where the robot saids "losing to a robot is a bit like losing to Martin Kaymer" .... Can explain that joke ? Lol is it his voice or play or I have no idea

 

 

I posted that vid in the you tube video section of the grill room forum. Not sure what the joke means, except maybe that Martin's swing is so solid, you could call him a robot..??? 

post #3 of 16

German's have a reputation (national stereotypes - nothing based on science you understand) for being mechanically efficient, unemotional, and lacking in flair at anything they do. Rory would know that. Were he still their leading player, then they'd have used Bernhard Langer just as easily. It's likely to be a comment aimed at the nationality of the player rather than the individual

post #4 of 16

Reminds me of the old beer commercial with a German standup comedian.  "I just flew in from Berlin and boy are my arms tired."  

 

"Germans don't do comedy, they do Beer!"  Really good beer by the way.

post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarawayFairways View Post
 

German's have a reputation (national stereotypes - nothing based on science you understand) for being mechanically efficient, unemotional, and lacking in flair at anything they do. Rory would know that. Were he still their leading player, then they'd have used Bernhard Langer just as easily. It's likely to be a comment aimed at the nationality of the player rather than the individual

Didn't Faldo have that same reputation? 

post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarawayFairways View Post
 

German's have a reputation (national stereotypes - nothing based on science you understand) for being mechanically efficient, unemotional, and lacking in flair at anything they do. Rory would know that. Were he still their leading player, then they'd have used Bernhard Langer just as easily. It's likely to be a comment aimed at the nationality of the player rather than the individual

 

Even Kaymer said that Germans strive for perfection. He said he got caught up in that, especially with being world number 1 for a short bit. It threw his game off. 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Missouri Swede View Post
 

Didn't Faldo have that same reputation? 

 

Faldo was consistent. He always seemed more likely to lurk in the shadows and just wait for others to fall apart. Still he put up some very good rounds of golf as well, but he as much more of a steady don't make mistakes type of golfer. 

post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missouri Swede View Post
 

Didn't Faldo have that same reputation? 

 

Funnily enough, Faldo was one name that came to my mind as I wrote that as there was always something android and mechanical about him. He would have been the archetypal German! He'd probably win a penalty shoot-out too (something Germans always do, and the British always fail at)

 

His 'reputation' however is quite interesting, as he was never really that popular in the UK (more so in the US so far as we can gather). Faldo was always regarded as being boring (despite having a very colourful personal life) but overall he wasn't someone we particularly warmed to.

 

We have a great tradition of building people up to shoot them down, and we also have a tendancy to warm to gallant losers more than mechanical winners for some reason (probably because we produce a lot more of the former than the latter). I wouldn't like to say which (if any) domestic golfers have really captured the public imagination. It took a long time for us to warm to Montgomrie, and that was largely on the back of Ryder Cups, and I suspect the same is possibly playing out for Poulter at the moment. The golfers who probably did transcend golf into the wider appreciation of the sports fan would include Ballesteros, Watson, Nicklaus & Woods. If you asked me to name the most popular British golfer however, I'd struggle. Faldo would have his advocates, but he wouldn't be the clear cut winner his achievements would entitle him to be

 

I'm half reminded of a commentary from Kiawah in 1991 as Langer is lining up his putt. It went something like

 

"and so Langer has a putt to win the hole and tie the match for Europe to retain the cup .... (strikes putt) ..... and the German misses!"

post #8 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarawayFairways View Post
 

I'm half reminded of a commentary from Kiawah in 1991 as Langer is lining up his putt. It went something like

 

"and so Langer has a putt to win the hole and tie the match for Europe to retain the cup .... (strikes putt) ..... and the German misses!"

 

Off topic but related to the above:  I've been told that when a Scottish athlete excels, the media (BBC?) tend to emphasize how well the "British" athlete did.  But when one does poorly, the adjective "Scottish" is used.

post #9 of 16

Yes.  It's been going on years.

 

It's also the case however that American's tend to commit the even bigger faux pas and refer to British, or Britain, as England. That goes down really well in Scotland, or Wales. You might get away with in Northern Ireland, but it would depend on which community you were talking with

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Missouri Swede View Post
 

 

Off topic but related to the above:  I've been told that when a Scottish athlete excels, the media (BBC?) tend to emphasize how well the "British" athlete did.  But when one does poorly, the adjective "Scottish" is used.

100% correct. At the Sochi Olympics our Men and Women curlers who naturally were all from Scotland (Glasgow infact), were naturally British, when they won some medals!

post #11 of 16

Just in case you're a bit confused by the geography of Scotland MS, I should point out that places like Perth (Eve Muirhead) and Lockerbie (David Murdoch) are suburbs of Glasgow, as indeed are Aberdeen, Dumfries, and Edinburgh. The same thing goes on at different levels!

 

If I were to be totally disingenuous I might point out that the curlers received significant funding from UK Sport that allowed them to be competitive, (English, Welsh, & some Irish taxpayers) it's little wonder that Eve's choked a few times when pushed for her views on independence, as she knows it'll cost her dearly unless Salmond has a fetish for curling. The women's team came within a whisker of giving up a few years ago until UK Sport stumped up the money. I should point out that Eve Muirhead plays off scratch at golf, turned down a scholarship to a US university, and is a member at Pitlochry. She'd have been lost to curling without the wider UK's financing her

 

The better example would be Andy Murray (who doesn't come from Glasgow either) but he's a genuinely homegrown Scot that hasn't relied to the same extent on UK lottery sports funding. Mind you, he's also the one is most likely to be reported as Scottish. I've got a feeling Liz McColgan suffered heavily from the British/ Scottish thing

 

As for their football and rugby teams being referred to as British when they're successful, I'd be happy to report back to you the moment it happens, but we've been waiting at least two decades now

post #12 of 16

ok, so heres what i thought up until this post.  a bit tongue in cheek, but more or less what i thought:

 

england = britain

great britain =/= england

ireland =/= scotland =/= england

great britain = england, scotland, ireland, wales and london.  (lol - whats the last one?)

 

 

the british open = the british open

The Open = the US Open

post #13 of 16

The issue of the Open Championship of Golf (founded 1860) has caused me to wonder what it will become known as for those American's who struggle with the concept of historical chronology and insist on inserting the 'British' prefix, should the Scot's vote for independence in September. The concept of Britain as it was, won't exist any longer. Calling it the English or Scottish dependent on where it's being held won't work, as both countries have their own open Championships already. An Open held at St Andrews will be being hosted outside of Britain - simple as that - ditto Turnberry, Carnoustie, Troon, and Muirfield. 

 

It's possible of course that you can apply a geographic demarcation to an event which is totally misleading and ask people to adopt it? I think there's a country that has a wholly domestic competition that they actually (without any sense of irony) call 'The World Series'. Actually I say that, but doesn't Canada play in the World Series? perhaps it isn't completely restricted to a single country? Having said that, the USPGA would doubtless expect to keep that appellation should they export the seasons final major to the far east or where ever.

 

It's also worth remembering of course just how the Open Championship of Golf came about, and try putting yourself in the place of the founders who conceived it. Remember this was at a time when the telephone hadn't been invented and America was months away from launching itself into a civil war. 

 

Only 8 players took part. How do you think you would have publicised the event? (well the obvious answer is the internet!)

 

What would you have described it as? Your priority was to get as many people to take part as possible as it would have been economically marginal, and indeed I think it missed a year in 1871. I'd say under the circumstances the Open Championship of Golf was both restrained and descriptive? It's not like they've called it the World Series after all. It's called the Open Championship of Golf for the rather obvious reasons that its a self-styled Championship designed to establish who the best player was upon the recent death of the player who was widely regarded as the best, but whose demise left a vacuum. It's open to anyone to enter (as it is today) so 'open' kinda worked, and it involved a game called 'golf'. Shock!

 

I'm struggling to think that as they sat round the table in Prestwick wondering what to call it and who to try and invite, that anyone thought to say, "perhaps we ought to call it the British Open, just in case in a few decades time other countries might decide to adopt the game more widely, and have their own Opens". I'm sure anyone suggetsing that would have been quickly told to concentrate on the 'now' and trying to make sure the original thing actually happened and that players turned up!

 

One final thought on this naming thing, concerns the 'Americas Cup' by way of a sought of precedent, or insight into wider perspectives perhaps?. The founding agreement was that the cups name would change to reflect the nation that currently held it. Well for about a century this was America, and the name became so synonymous with the event that it slowly became adopted as the norm. Then in 1983 American lost to Australia, and under the competitions protocols the cup should have reverted to become known as the 'Australias Cup' for such time as they held it. Momentarily this looked like happening as people wanted to honour the original concept, but ultimately it never did. I think there was probably general agreement that it 'didn't sound right'. The other competing nations were happy to allow America to retain a stake on the name which clearly breached the original concept without resorting to trying to undermine the heritage of sailing by referring to it as the Australias Cup

post #14 of 16

Actually, thinking about it, there's a few these in the world of sport where the British have invented something and the name goes global and gets copied

 

The tennis tournament known as 'Wimbledon' is actually called the 'All England Lawn Tennis Championship' I believe. That's always known as Wimbledon however by fans and players alike, even though the other slam events take the countries name. I can't really explain that one

 

The horse race known as 'the Derby' was so called because of a flip of coin between two aristocrats. The Earl of Derby called correctly. Had he not done so, Lord Bunbury would have won, and America would have had the Kentucky Bunbury (which scans better). So far as I know 'the Derby' is always called so, although I'm aware of the occasional mischievous Irish race fan who tries to insert the prefix 'Epsom' to downgrade in some way

 

Other sports that came together at the same time, like the Grand Prix Motor Racing circus all adopted their nations names, which was only correct and proper

 

There's other unlikely sports that the British invented like Table Tennis and downhill Ski-ing, but I'm not aware of any tournament that attests to these

 

Some indigneuous American sports are hybrids that have their roots in British origins combining things like rugby, stool-ball, rounders, and cricket, but they're sufficiently distinct to have legitmiately carved out their own identities and I don't think anyone really grudges that (although we're always perplexed about how a game played with your hands, get's to be called football)

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarawayFairways View Post

 

 

Some indigneuous American sports are hybrids that have their roots in British origins combining things like rugby, stool-ball, rounders, and cricket, but they're sufficiently distinct to have legitmiately carved out their own identities and I don't think anyone really grudges that (although we're always perplexed about how a game played with your hands, get's to be called football)

 

 

Quote:

Etymology and names

In the United States, American football is referred to as "football".[2] The term "football" was officially established in the rulebook for the 1876 college football season, when the sport first shifted from soccer-style rules to rugby-style rules; although it could easily have been called "rugby" at this point, Harvard, one of the primary proponents of the rugby-style game, compromised and did not request the name of the sport be changed to "rugby".[3] In countries where other codes offootball are popular, such as the United Kingdom and Australia, the terms "gridiron" or "American football" are favored.[4][5]

 

 

I think basically all sports that involve some sort of kicking of a ball is under the name of football. Basically it was called football, then the rules changed and the name was never changed. 

post #16 of 16

Rugby features a set piece called the 'scrum' which I always felt was too close to the 'line of scrimmage' for there not to have been some crossover

 

I've certainly heard both 'gridiron' and 'American football' used to describe the variant, but largely to avoid confusion. The example of Australia would be better if it explain that they have an indigenuous game played exclusive by them called 'Australian Rules Football' (popularly known as Aussie Rules) as so their insertion of the 'American' would be distinguish rather than denigrade. I suspect the Irish do something similar as they have a version called 'Gaelic Football' and would doubtless use something to distinguish between them I suspect (we need an Irish insight to confirm this or otherwise) as I don't actually know. More recently of course the brand marketeers have got to work, and the sport is becoming increasingly known as "NFL"

 

I was wondering about horse racing again actually, as we have a fillies race called 'The Oaks' which the Irish and Americans adopt their version of. The French have a similar race but its called the Prix Diane, but I'm pretty certain the Germans adopt the 'Diane' name for their equivalent. I'm equally certain the Italians adopt the British Oaks variant. 

 

I'm half curious now to know how this came into being, and why the Germans would have adopted a French name. I can't think of anytime this side of 1813 when the French held influence in Germany. The English racing fraternity certainly refer to both races as the Diane, but I'm reasonably certain that its called the French Oaks by the wider sporting press (not that anyone is really that interested) and that's the issue really. By calling the race the French Oaks, a British sports fan with little interest in racing would be given a clue, but the racing fan who knows, will call it the Prix Diane, and accept the French/ German right to name their own races

 

I think the secret probably lies in distinguishing and ease of identification

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