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I'd Be Scratch with a Better Mental Game - Page 5

post #73 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

 

Generally speaking, and entirely IMO, people overstate the importance of the mental game.

 

When thinking about my approach this year to golf I was going to try and improve the mental side of the game.  To start the year I had thought I was doing rather well with my new and improved mental approach.  I wasn't letting bad holes or stretches get to me thus allowing me to make up shots.  However, your statement got me thinking and to be honest, better shots have improved my mental side of the game.  I am giving myself a lot more makeable birdie opportunities which has seen a significant increase in the amount of birdies this year.  Between the birdies and mixing in a couple of eagles this year, I have been able to get shots back.  Really it isn't my improved mental approach but rather my ability to hit better shots.  More birdies will improve anyone's mental approach. :-)

post #74 of 78

I've read a few books on "the mental game". It can help you remain calm or resist the urge to say to yourself, "I'm having the best round of golf EVER!" which usually comes right before a major blow up. Overall, I think it can help you from playing worse than your ability level, but I don't see it helping you play at a higher level. The swing is the foundation on which everything else is built.

post #75 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlSpackler View Post
 

I've read a few books on "the mental game". It can help you remain calm or resist the urge to say to yourself, "I'm having the best round of golf EVER!" which usually comes right before a major blow up. Overall, I think it can help you from playing worse than your ability level, but I don't see it helping you play at a higher level. The swing is the foundation on which everything else is built.

I play golf with a guy on the weekends that read a book on the mental approach to putting, I think it was "Putting out of your mind".  He said it really helped him.  He has taken a good amount of money from me due to the better results he gets with the putter.  He was one of the best putters I played with all of last year which included some + handicaps.  This year he is putting well but last year was ridiculous all year.

post #76 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Party View Post
 

I play golf with a guy on the weekends that read a book on the mental approach to putting, I think it was "Putting out of your mind".  He said it really helped him.  He has taken a good amount of money from me due to the better results he gets with the putter.  He was one of the best putters I played with all of last year which included some + handicaps.  This year he is putting well but last year was ridiculous all year.

 

He must have a decent putting stroke to begin with. If that is the case, then learning how to focus and not let all the other crap pollute your mind can certainly help. I've actually just started reading that book myself. I like Dr. Bob. With the full swing though, improving your mental game might help your scores a little, but not take you to scratch. I've been there. Mental game improvement will not add 30 yards to your tee shots or help you curve a ball around a dog leg. It just won't. Where it could help a lot of high handicappers is to stop beating their clubs on the ground or throwing them in anger when they hit a bad shot.

post #77 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlSpackler View Post
 

 

He must have a decent putting stroke to begin with. If that is the case, then learning how to focus and not let all the other crap pollute your mind can certainly help. I've actually just started reading that book myself. I like Dr. Bob. With the full swing though, improving your mental game might help your scores a little, but not take you to scratch. I've been there. Mental game improvement will not add 30 yards to your tee shots or help you curve a ball around a dog leg. It just won't. Where it could help a lot of high handicappers is to stop beating their clubs on the ground or throwing them in anger when they hit a bad shot.

Yes, he has a decent putting stroke.  Agree it will not take you to scratch if you are a ways out.  I do think it can help with a few strokes when you get down into low single digit handicap territory.  He said where it really helped him was standing over the ball with confidence.  He said he believed he was going to make every putt.  I do believe having confidence in your stroke can create better results when contacting the ball.  I can think of so many times where I stood over a ball with no confidence and I made poor contact which is most of the time.  :censored:

post #78 of 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by Party View Post
 

Yes, he has a decent putting stroke.  Agree it will not take you to scratch if you are a ways out.  I do think it can help with a few strokes when you get down into low single digit handicap territory.  He said where it really helped him was standing over the ball with confidence.  He said he believed he was going to make every putt.  I do believe having confidence in your stroke can create better results when contacting the ball.  I can think of so many times where I stood over a ball with no confidence and I made poor contact which is most of the time.  :censored:


I hear ya. ;-)

 

Confidence is a good thing as long as it is realistic.

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