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Need guidance in club choice (fairway wood, irons, wedges)

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

I started golfing when I was around 6 and played very well for several years but ended up losing interest for whatever reason. 20 years later I'm getting back into it and I'm beginning the process of buying some nice clubs. I already bought a Callaway Razr Fit Xtreme driver (10.5*) and an Odyssey White Hot Pro V-Line putter.

 

My handicap now is around 20 but I've been improving with every game as I get my groove back so I'm looking to get some clubs that I can "grow into" so to speak. I definitely do not want a pure GI iron that will hold me back once I get my swing adjusted again.

 

I have been looking at Mizuno MP64's and when I hit them the other day they felt amazing and not a single mis-hit with them. I've also been looking at Callaway Apex and X-Forged but I haven't had the chance to hit them yet. I've read some people say that the X-Forged and MP64 are almost identical clubs with only negligible differences, but then I see some say that the X-Forged have quite a bit more forgiveness but still allow you to work the ball a decent amount.

 

Are the MP64's really not very forgiving irons? This seems odd to me because I usually mishit about 1 out of every 10 balls at the driving range but when I was hitting the MP64 the worst shot I had was 180yds with a 5 iron, but it still got nice loft, so I figured that they were pretty forgiving irons because it doesn't seem likely that I'm out-performing myself with a completely new and foreign set of clubs.

 

In the mean time I wouldn't mind acquiring a 3 wood and some wedges, though. I know I will have to get them separately anyway, and I don't really know where to start. I'm looking for minimal spin in my wedges, I'd definitely like a higher loft to drop the ball right on target with as little movement after impact as possible. I tried a few Cleveland wedges and really liked them (don't remember the models), but are there some tips you could provide in picking out a fairway wood and wedges?

 

Sorry to ask so many questions at once, I hope it's not overwhelming.

post #2 of 7

GI irons don't hold back the numerous tour players who use them, including multiple major winners. You can get the MPs if you want, they're really nice clubs, but they will not perform as well as GI irons.

 

I'd recommend a hybrid you like somewhere in the 18-22 degree range, and if you really want to then add a fairway wood. 

 

As far as wedges, I'd try to get fitted if possible, but just try to pick good loft gaps and get the distances you need. They are 99% technique, so the shot shape and spin you want are all on you. Mizuno wedges are hard to beat though.

 

Always look for older models for better deals compared to the latest stuff; I got a pair of R12s new for 60$ each. Never paid over 150 for a club.

post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 

I didn't mean to sound arrogant if that's how I came off. What I meant is, I would like to have forgiveness but I also want to be able to work the ball in the future and I don't want to have to buy new clubs to do that.

 

I've tried hitting a 4 hybrid but I just cannot ever get a good hit with it, that's why I was leaning more towards a fairway wood because I can hit 3 woods pretty consistently. I'm not sure why I can hit a wood but not a hybrid, but that seems to be the case. My first experience with a hybrid was this season, though.

 

I was looking at the MP60's because they are significantly cheaper than the MP64's, but from what I read the 64's have more forgiveness which is what made me lean towards those despite the higher price.

post #4 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by danL View Post
 

I would like to have forgiveness but I also want to be able to work the ball in the future and I don't want to have to buy new clubs to do that.

 

I've tried hitting a 4 hybrid but I just cannot ever get a good hit with it, that's why I was leaning more towards a fairway wood because I can hit 3 woods pretty consistently. I'm not sure why I can hit a wood but not a hybrid, but that seems to be the case. My first experience with a hybrid was this season, though.

Don't take my statements as calling you arrogant, it's just that the idea that most tour players use blades is a complete myth. None of them have trouble working the ball; if anything, Bubba Watson uses a cavity back set and GI driver and he's probably the most famous for working the ball. Almost all use some form of hybrid as well.

 

Regarding the hybrid, go to a shop and demo as many different ones as you can. One hybrid at one loft will not represent the available choices; many are more wood-like in their shape than iron-like, and a 5 wood can accomplish the same things if you really want. Just find one you like and it's a very versatile weapon.

 

I have hit the MP64s and the MP4. Neither of them are forgiving. The MP54s are the closest thing to what you seem to want, though something like the JPX800 pro would be a better option.

post #5 of 7
No clubs of decent quality are going to hold you back. There are major winners using what some call "game improvement" clubs. The brand has nothing to do with it and the ones that are harder to hit will not make you a better player, nor will they allow "workability" . The only problem GI clubs is that they may not suit a player who naturally hits it high.
post #6 of 7

Dan, a few questions:

  • How old are you?
  • What is your overall fitness situation - strength and flexibility?
  • What is your driver swingspeed? (would influence overall shaft selection)

 

Also, I've heard from a lot of golfers personally on the Players/blades, GI and SGI irons. One scramble partner from  a few years ago had been a scratch golfer for his small college team, when he played blade irons. I met him in his late 20s, when he had a job and a wife and two sons. He had swapped out the blades for GI irons. The gladly traded the blades " trick shot" potential for the reliability of the GI irons - he just didn't have the practice time to keep a "blade swing' in tune.

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuciusWooding View Post
 

Don't take my statements as calling you arrogant, it's just that the idea that most tour players use blades is a complete myth. None of them have trouble working the ball; if anything, Bubba Watson uses a cavity back set and GI driver and he's probably the most famous for working the ball. Almost all use some form of hybrid as well.

 

Regarding the hybrid, go to a shop and demo as many different ones as you can. One hybrid at one loft will not represent the available choices; many are more wood-like in their shape than iron-like, and a 5 wood can accomplish the same things if you really want. Just find one you like and it's a very versatile weapon.

 

I have hit the MP64s and the MP4. Neither of them are forgiving. The MP54s are the closest thing to what you seem to want, though something like the JPX800 pro would be a better option.


I agree with Lucius here.  It seems like every tour player hits Titleist MB blades but I would bet more play the AP2's.  There are a lot of forged clubs out there that can give you workability while not punishing you very harshly for an off shot.  I would rather lose 10 yards of distance than shoot 20 yards left or right.

 

I just pulled the trigger on JPX 850 pro's and was really up in the air between them and the MP54's.  It came down to shots that I missed slightly.  When I hit them perfect, the MP54 was the best feeling club I have ever hit.  The JPX 850's were one of the best feeling.  When I missed though, the JPX 850 still provided me with a GI lie where the MP54's didn't leave much to work with.

 

I would not go for the MP's but these are just my opinions

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