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Lessons vs Fitting

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
For my birthday I was given a gift cert to a golf center near my school and I'm pondering the value of lessons vs a fitting. I'll probably end up doing some of both but my main questions are:

1) I don't really feel like buying new clubs or spending too much money. what's a ballpark amount I should expect to pay to modify existing clubs?

2) I'm still relatively new and tinkering with my swing. Is a fitting going to be accurate if I take lessons afterwards and the instructor alters my swing?

Any insight is appreciated.
post #2 of 10
Not trying to be rude, but with a handicap of 28, I think the right choice is clear ... Lessons

I promise a professional will change your swing ...
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
No offense taken man. I was looking for brute honesty and I have thick skin. With someone with a name like "isukatgolf" you should appreciate that!

I was leaning that way I just hear alot of the "if you use all different types of clubs with the same swing you're doing yourself a diservice" talk
post #4 of 10

Giving that you want to do both, I would go with lessons first. Not just a few lessons, but as many as your pocket book can handle. Then once you have a decent golf swing, and your scores are consistent, then try a fitting. Once you have those numbers compare them to your current golf clubs. Your swing will most likely match up with current set of clubs if you are shooting good scores.  Now, IMHO, the best way to go is to find a qualified instructor who is also a qualified club fitter. You will save some money with a combo instructor/fitter. What a combo fitter/instructor will do, is look at your swing, and then check your clubs against your swing. If your clubs are wrong, the fitter might be able to adjust them to match your swing. Or, if your swing is off, the instructor my be able to adjust your swing to fit your clubs. One thing to remember is that some clubs, because of the way they are made, cannot be adjusted unless they are sent back to the original manufacturer. Some brands can't be adjusted at all. others can be adjusted using a vice and a 2X4 like Moe Norman says he did. How much it costs to adjust clubs is hard to say. I just received my clubs back after a needed adjustment, and all I had to do was pay the shipping costs, one way. I paid to get them to the manufacturer, and the manufacturer paid to ship them back to me. 12 irons cost me $18.00. Service after the sale is why I play the brand I do.  

post #5 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by PJCdude View Post

No offense taken man. I was looking for brute honesty and I have thick skin. With someone with a name like "isukatgolf" you should appreciate that!

I was leaning that way I just hear alot of the "if you use all different types of clubs with the same swing you're doing yourself a diservice" talk

Lol ... Believe me I spent a ton of money before I went and got lesson 3 months ago ... Have dropped at 8-10 strokes ... And know I can get more ... No reason why I can score in the low 90 now

So I would say I just about ready for a fitting

Good luck to you!
post #6 of 10

I would also go with the lesson's first. Re: instructors, and there are threads regarding this. Not all instructor's fit all students, I suggest you interview a few. Ask questions like, what their teaching method is, what their credentials are, and of course cost. I would also suggest against buying a block of lesson's to begin with. 

 

Take a couple 1/2 hr. lessons first, if you click with that instructor, then if you have the means, then buy a block (which is usually cheaper) in the long run. Oh, also don't be afraid to ask why he/she is having you do certain moves. Once you find someone, it is then up to you to be a good student, i.e. do what they say, exactly how they say to do it. BTW, video goes a long way in lesson's, as you may think your doing one thing, when in fact your likely doing something different.  Good Luck 

post #7 of 10

Lessons first, yeah. Without knowing anything about your swing, it is possible your swing will change when taking lessons. Getting fit with the current swing might be misleading if your setup or something is off, and affects the results from the fitting. Additionally, if you don't feel any big issues with the current clubs, getting new ones won't necessarily change anything.

 

I believe getting fit at some point is useful for everyone (having in mind that there are good and bad fitters out there), but for improving from your level, I'd recommend lessons first. You should ask the instructor during the first lesson if he has any comment on your current clubs. Hopefully, he will be able to tell if it is fine for now, or if the clubs are really hurting your game.
 

post #8 of 10

Lessons. This will give you a good idea on what you need to work on.  It will help set you in the right direction for improvement.  Take your time with the instructor and ask lots of questions.

post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the advice fellas. Ill go book some lessons soon and maybe keep y all posted.
post #10 of 10

I agree with the group that lessons, and not a club fitting, make more sense, given where you are.  The only thing I'd have to add is that, if you are playing with second hand or hand me down clubs, you might spend some of that gift certificate on getting your clubs regripped--especially if the grips are more than a year or two old.

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