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Restoring an vintage leather Burton bag

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I just picked up a vintage Burton cart bag. It's all cowhide leather. I'm saying that because of the cow head emblem stamped into the side of the bag. It's a light tan natural leather bag and looks like from the 60s or 70s. It does have some stains on the bottom that look like maybe old dried water stains. It has the rain cover. Because the rain cover has probably never seen the sun, it is a nicer darker tan leather. I'm hoping someone can give me some advice as to how to restore this beautiful bag. I'm hoping I can remove the stains and also darken up the bag leather to match the rain hood. I'm thinking saddle soap but don't want to touch it until I know what I'm doing. Removing the stains is my main concern at this point. Any suggestions?

post #2 of 9

Welcome to the site, check this out

 

http://www.theleathergolfbag.com/catalog/item/7038584/7084011.htm

post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks and thanks for the link. I've used Lexol before on my furniture. Don't know why I didn't think of using it on this bag. Do you think it will be better than saddle soap?

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Syberson View Post
 

Thanks and thanks for the link. I've used Lexol before on my furniture. Don't know why I didn't think of using it on this bag. Do you think it will be better than saddle soap?

 

Sorry I have no idea. I just googled "restoring leather golf bags" and found the link.

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 

I just picked up some Lexol cleaner and conditioner. It seems Lexol is the gold standard for leather so gonna give it a try. They did tell me that saddle soap would leave a residue on the leather. I appreciate the direction. Thanks!

post #6 of 9

I think if you buff the saddle soap properly with a clean towel or rag,  the residue is not much of problem. I do agree that overall, the Lexol is probably better and softens and preserves a little better. If you can find a matching boot creme and apply, brush, and buff as you would to a good pair of shoes after the Lexol treament, it would impart a light glow and add a bit of protection, as well as temporarily cover light scratches.

post #7 of 9

Lexol is good stuff. Been in the car biz forever and have tried just about everything there is and Lexol is still the best. Just used it on my leather wingback chairs at home that my dog has claimed as a sometimes perch/bed. A couple sprays and the nail marks he leaves behind are gone and the leather has a nice supple feel to it again. Good thing about it really hard to use too much. What doesn't soak in easily wipes away.

post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 

I agree. I've used Lexol on my sofa and chair and it seems to work great. This bag I have is old, dry, abused, and in some areas the once smooth leather is scraped up a bit. I'll have to get a picture. Probably was quite the bag back in the day. But it is all leather and would be cool, albeit heavy, to carry around now if I could get it restored. Actually wouldn't be carrying it, but more of a cart bag.

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

I was thinking the same thing about the boot polish. Would like to get the faded bag back to the deeper color to match the rain hood.

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