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What is more difficult links golf or parkland golf? - Page 2

Poll Results: What's harder to score well on?

 
  • 25% (7)
    Links
  • 25% (7)
    Parkland
  • 48% (13)
    Neither
27 Total Votes  
post #19 of 50

I voted links being harder, for me at least.

 

I grew up in hills and trees and consequently, parkland style golf. I would truly love to experience some links golf, but have not yet. I have played some flat courses with no trees, but they were mainly just flat treeless goat farms, nothing like the links courses you would find in the Northwest, Michigan, or of course the true links of GB. On the flat courses I have played, the lack of reference points or trees to frame my target has been a little disorienting, and even though they were "easier", I usually play better with trees.

 

I agree with Hardballs that links would transfer to parkland better than parkland to links. I think with links, you would really have to focus on a target, which you should anyway, but with parkland it is often framed for you.

 

I would certainly like the opportunity to prove or disprove my theory though!

post #20 of 50
There are easier and harder versions of both. Neither is necessarily tougher that the other simply because of the style of course.
post #21 of 50

I'm a member at a links course in the UK, it's not quite the the same as you see in Scotland etc because it's quite high up on the cliffs, but there's still plenty to contend with, mainly the tight fairways, wind and the undulations.  One thing that makes a links course easier is the roll out you get with the ball, when it's dry you you can get 90+ yards of roll on a drive which carries 230-240, making some of them holes very easy, something which I rarely see happen on a parkland course.  The greens can also dry out quite alot, which poses problems.

 

Here's a picture from one of the tees at my course, which is made up of 28 holes, with elevation changes of 90feet.  Hard work to play.

 

 

Saying all this, the picture above isn't much like the Scottish links courses, as you go further down the cliff it becomes more "linksy"

post #22 of 50
Can't say because I've never played a links course. I'm goin to Ireland next summer though and am definitely looking forward to getting the chance.
post #23 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spyder View Post
 

 

... I would argue Pebble Beach, ...

I wouldn't.  Other than having "Links" in the name, being next to the ocean, and having a traditional "loop" type layout, I don't thing Pebble qualifies ... at least as far as what I imagine links courses being.  Pebble has lush grass, and nice green rough, and you aren't ever really playing on the ground there.

 

The ones that I imagine as qualifying out here (and I'm speaking out of my rear cuz I've played exactly zero of them:-P) are the Bandon Courses, Chambers Bay, maybe Half Moon Bay??, and maybe Spanish Bay too, but I really have no idea.

 

The logical answer to me seems to be what @David in FL said.

post #24 of 50

I'm going with neither as well.

 

Any type course can be a bear with a penal hazard here or there, a few clicks of mower deck height, or some well placed trees or brush.

post #25 of 50

I voted for links golf. Not only do you have to execute the shot, you have to choose it to begin with. Often on a parkland course your shot choice is virtually dictated to you.

post #26 of 50

I play a links course every week in the south-west of England and it's superb fun. But I also played the Montgomery course at Celtic Manor last week, and that was great fun - it's carved out of fam, woods and parkland on top of a hill - about as far from a links course as you can get.

 

Play links on a lovely calm summers day and you will think it is the true test, but play it in 40 mph winds and sheer rain, you will hate the experience.

 

I voted neither. The links taliban will not appreciate this view. Keep away from them.

post #27 of 50

Well i play a parkland course fairways are tight and loads off trees there, be off the fairway and you most likely have to chip out.

But this is my home course, i play more park courses nearby and those are easier to play.

But because i play parkland courses most of the time, i think Links is more difficult to play, I find it hard to hit the right distances on links courses.

and heavy rough is not my favorite also.

post #28 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

I voted for links golf. Not only do you have to execute the shot, you have to choose it to begin with. Often on a parkland course your shot choice is virtually dictated to you.

You could use the same argument to support the opposite opinion. In links golf you often have more choices, whereas on a parkland course you're forced to play a specific shot.a2_wink.gif

Of course, giving amateurs multiple choices doesn't necessarily help them.... a2_wink.gif
post #29 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

You could use the same argument to support the opposite opinion. In links golf you often have more choices, whereas on a parkland course you're forced to play a specific shot.a2_wink.gif

 

That's the point: choice is a difficulty factor.

post #30 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

That's the point: choice is a difficulty factor.


So is standing there and having one option and it's a shot you know you can't hit that day. :surrender:

 

I have no first hand experience with that because I have all of the shots all of the time. (Lying). :-D

post #31 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunther View Post


I've played 5 or 6 true links courses in Scotland. Closest I came in the US is Kiawah Island and a seaside course in Rhode Island. The US courses felt much different but I'm not sure that disqualifies them as being true links.

Which RI course @Gunther ?

post #32 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogielicious View Post

Which RI course @Gunther
 ?
I believe it was Winnipaug Country Club but it could have been Weekapaug. Not the best I've played but fun because of the views.
post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunther View Post

I believe it was Winnipaug Country Club but it could have been Weekapaug. Not the best I've played but fun because of the views.
I believe it was Weekapaug because I remember it being semi-private. Have you played them?
post #34 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunther View Post

I believe it was Winnipaug Country Club but it could have been Weekapaug. Not the best I've played but fun because of the views.
I hope this comment didn't offend. I've done that inadvertently before. I only say it because the course wasn't maintained great the day I played, had been a few days since it had been mowed but it was a lot of fun and I'd definitely go back.
post #35 of 50

Both parkland and linksland courses put a premium on certain shots, at the expense of rarely using others.

 

 For many Americans, the challenge of linksland holes involves the wind and the ability to hit longer chip and run, and to putt from the edge of the fairway. Part of this results from recent U.S. golf design trends in which some architects put in lots of crowned and elevated greens that call for lob shots. Many U.S. architects turn the short game into dart throwing, with demand for lots of high, spinning shots, and little chance for players to play longer running shots.  

 

St. Louis area has at least two linksland courses which I'm aware of:

 

And we have several other courses with stretches of clearly linksland style holes amid the 18.

post #36 of 50

I selected "neither" since I only played one links style course, Ballyowen in Northwest NJ.  I did not find it terribly difficult and do have much more trouble hitting the ball into the woods (It was also not windy and 48F).  And many of the courses in my area are not like parks between holes but are inpenetrable brush or woodlands.

 

There is also another style which was shown at the US Open at Pinehurst, and is also represented at Pine Valley and other courses in Southern NJ.  These courses have waste area that can be brutal with a combination of gritty, stoney sand, and lots of scrub pines and weeds to create problems.  There are many types of terrain for golf courses and each on can be a bear.

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