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Practice area at home

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

Just paid off our mortgage a couple of months ago. :dance:

 

We're modeling our kitchen this winter, and either next year or the year after we are remodeling our patio (depending on how much we spend on the kitchen).

 

I'm considering a putting green, probably about 30' in diameter.  Going to be directly off the patio, pretty much at ground level.

 

I live in Wisconsin, so I'm concerned about the longevity of a synthetic putting surface.

 

Just looking for any tips/warning/advice any of you might have, based on your experiences.

 

Thanks in advance,

 

WindLaker

post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by windlaker View Post
 

Just paid off our mortgage a couple of months ago. :dance:

 

We're modeling our kitchen this winter, and either next year or the year after we are remodeling our patio (depending on how much we spend on the kitchen).

 

I'm considering a putting green, probably about 30' in diameter.  Going to be directly off the patio, pretty much at ground level.

 

I live in Wisconsin, so I'm concerned about the longevity of a synthetic putting surface.

 

Just looking for any tips/warning/advice any of you might have, based on your experiences.

 

Thanks in advance,

 

WindLaker

Ours is paid off in 13 months!

 

I've considered this too.  I am pushing this thread along in hopes someone with experience will answer.

post #3 of 8

No tips really  ... we got several quotes, look at the product (not every one sales the same stuff), and looked at post install help/warranty.  My is 10 yea warranty.  ( I live in the blazing sun of Phx ... the sun will destroying anything ... )

 

My green 459 sq ft ... love it ... I also got them to spray grass killer before laying it ...  

 

I also got them to put a little tier in it for one hole ...

 

My putting has really gotten better ... I average about 1.7 putts these days and getting better ... 

 

Good luck! 

post #4 of 8

Just put a deposit down on a synthetic putting green for our backyard that is being remodeled as we speak.  Ours will be nothing to write home about ... very small (about 120sf including the fringe), hidden over on the side of the house, and with two holes.  It will likely be mostly flat, but I may have them put a little break in somewhere.  The yard is supposed to be mostly done in about 5 weeks, at which time the green will be installed.  I cannot wait!

 

We even have a bunch of glow balls (left over from my themed 40th birthday party) that we can use for night putting!!!

post #5 of 8

As a former contractor/carpenter, all I can add is, you usually get what you pay for. For ANY home project that requires a contractor, get 3 Bids, ask for references, and Call those folks, ask how the contractor worked out for them, i.e. finish on time, were they clean, did they explain Exactly what they were going to do, and did the include that in the contract.

 

Don't necessarily go with the most expensive, or the cheapest bid. And, make sure to get along and feel comfy with your contractor.

 

This has been a Free public announcement provided by the Hammer..:-D 

post #6 of 8

I built one several years ago. The number one thing you need to know is how much annual rain you get, and make sure your practice green drains quite well. Real grass, or synthetic, make sure it will drain. This includes draining underneath the surface. You'll need to use some material underneath your green to facilitate drainage to keep from getting bumps, and sinking areas. 

 

When I built mine, I made sure it was built in such a fashion that I could remodel the surface. My green was not 100%  flat. I built mine with some contours in it. The reason I made it easy to change those contours was because after practicing the same putts several hundred times, I lost interest in practicing those same old putts. I elected to use a synthetic material for this reason. 

 

If you have the room, make sure you allow for a fringe to practice your chipping. Put in a mini sand trap if your allotted practice area will allow it.

 

Another thing. If you have enough room. Let your wife plant some nice shrubs around your practice area. She will appreciate being included in your little endeavor.  

post #7 of 8
A company in Wisconsin (I think Green Bay) sent me a free sample. All you have to do is ask them.

It seems decent, and they had claims of some being in place for a long time.
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all for your help.

I can't do to much research right now...I'm supposed to be researching kitchen stuff these days.

I'll be sure to bookmark this thread.

WindLaker
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