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Dick's Sporting Goods Fires In-Store Golf Pros - Page 11

post #181 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by tye203 View Post

I went to dicks yesterday to demo a nike hybrid 4. They were very friendly but a new hybrid was $229. My wife got my nike vrs x iron set for $250. I am interested in their fitting services but not until next year.

As far as the economic of golf there are three core issues.

Affordability ; clubs and green fees are expensive along with shoes. Unless you are diligent and buy used stuff you could easily spend $1,000 just to start. Most 18-30 don't have that kind of money because of student loans or not having a job at all.

Diversity; most 18-30 want diversity in culture and color in the activities that they do. Golf just isn't it for diversity at this point in color and class. See affordability

Time; let's be honest we enjoy golf but it is time consuming. A career person would have to give up a Saturday or Sunday to play a round of golf. I have 2 kids and I get out twice a month but it's because I teach and have summers free and half days during the year.

At some point golf will have to innovate or they will continue to decline. A young charismatic golfer needs to bring excitement to the game or it won't be appealing to young people.

Ok, I'm with you on points 1 and 3 but diversity? You mean white kids choose to play hoops because they might meet some black kids? Don't think so. Now, would it be nice if there were more diversity, sure, but I don't believe that's a factor in what a kid gravitates towards.

And, depending on where you play, you can have all kinds of diversity. There's a Thursday/Saturday group that plays at Cedar Crest in Dallas. I play with them from time to time. About 30 guys and my buddy, me and 2 others are the only white guys. I enjoy those rounds and usually get my ass kicked.
post #182 of 266
When I say diversity it's not just black and white it's through all social classes. Make the game accessible to as many people as possible and you will grow the sport.
post #183 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by tye203 View Post

When I say diversity it's not just black and white it's through all social classes. Make the game accessible to as many people as possible and you will grow the sport.
Mmm, that kind of leaks into your first point on affordability. There's tons of diversity in golf in Dallas, and I suspect most cities. Just depends where you play. For some reason, however, that diversity doesn't translate to the pro tours.

If Tiger couldn't crack that nut, I'm not sure it can be fixed. The First Tee seems to be helping although not to any obvious degree yet. Perhaps in time...
post #184 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunther View Post


Ok, I'm with you on points 1 and 3 but diversity? You mean white kids choose to play hoops because they might meet some black kids? Don't think so. Now, would it be nice if there were more diversity, sure, but I don't believe that's a factor in what a kid gravitates towards.

 

Yeah, I agree with this. I'm frequently exposed to people in that age group, and it's the attractiveness (or lack thereof) of the activity itself that determines whether they'll do it -- assuming that it's both affordable and accessible. If it doesn't appeal to them on that base level, they'll just do something else.

post #185 of 266
Right people want to watch someone they "think" they can relate too.
post #186 of 266
Golf participation and ratings soared during tigers top years. He moved the visual tv needle does golf have another star like that? I think Rory could possible be that person. Not for diversity but just playing top level golf.
post #187 of 266
An Exerpt from an article I read this morning that I thought was interesting


All In

The thing is, a business like Dick’s doesn’t buy as they go. They commit early, and they buy big. For a company the size of Dick’s Sporting Goods TaylorMade is their Costco, they save when they buy in bulk.

They did, and they got stuck holding the bag for a metric shit-ton of TaylorMade gear.

How bad is it?

I spoke with two senior level industry experts yesterday who estimate that a full 60% of Dick’s golf inventory is tied up in TaylorMade. Couple that surplus with another estimate that puts Dick’s TaylorMade sales down by upwards of 40% from last year, and well, it’s pretty easy to pinpoint the source of the congestion.

Net Down to Zero Profits

At any given Dick’s you’re likely to find upwards of 10 different TaylorMade drivers still on shelves. That number includes an assortment of standard models (R1, RBZ, RBZ 2, SLDR, SLDR S, JetSpeed), Pro & TP, black and white, and for good measure, a few Dick’s exclusive’s like the Gloire and RBZ SL.

Having a huge selection of gear, particularly at discount prices isn’t necessarily a bad thing for the consumer, but it’s a huge problem for Dick’s right now.

Because of the way most major manufacturers handle price cuts (a process known as Net Down), Dick’s (and everyone else) only makes much in the way of an actual profit when it sells the very latest and greatest.

For the rest of it (the 6+ month old stuff)…the cost of those discounts was already applied to the purchase of the new gear. So while selling a few R1s might clear some shelf space, it doesn’t actually make Dick’s any real money.

Good news…all those near-zero profit drivers, they still count in the market share reports (Dick’s doesn’t provide info to Golf Datatech, but most other retail outlets do).

Once upon a time retailers could Net Down and still turn a profit. Not anymore, not with this much surplus. With the retail market and the industry as a whole in decline, the accelerated release model has very quickly been proven unsustainable.

Enough Blame to Go Around

While TaylorMade faces the brunt of the criticism, the reality is that this mess isn’t totally on them. Callaway followed the TaylorMade model, and as recently as last year was still talking about being extremely aggressive with their releases.

I’m guessing plans have changed.

Over the last few seasons, Cleveland, Cobra, Adams…actually let’s call it what it is – EVERYBODY not named Titleist, PING, or Nike has aggressively discounted gear early in the season, and they too have contributed to the equipment clog.

Let’s pause for a moment to appreciate those few companies who refused to contribute to what is now, inarguably, a total cluster****.

If you’re going to blame TaylorMade for being the leader, shake an angry fist at all of the followers too.

Dick’s shouldn’t get a pass in this either. It’s not a victim by any stretch. Absolutely TaylorMade has been known to do some arm twisting. You want the biggest wholesale discount, you’ll need to buy more inventory than anyone can reasonably expect to sell in this market.

Not only did Dick’s load up with the standard stuff, they partnered with TaylorMade on those exclusives I talked about too. Dick’s went all in with TaylorMade and they got busted.

Dick’s twisted its own arm.

Sadly…that’s only half the story.

The Other Half of the Story

There’s more to this than just a flooded retail channel. It would be easy to view those 500+ golf professionals who lost their jobs this week as collateral damage in TaylorMade’s war on the rest of the golf industry, but the reality is they’re victims of a badly miscalculated power play on the part of Dick’s Sporting Goods.

Have you ever stopped to think why Dick’s even staffed PGA Professionals in the first place? I mean, when you really think about it, it’s ludicrous.

You think the average big box customer cares about custom fitting, or having access to a credentialed PGA Professional? C’mon.

Would Best Buy hire sound engineers to sell stereos?

It’s just bad business to pay someone 40-50K per year to do the same job that somebody else will do for $10 an hour.

That’s not a knock on the PGA Pros who lost their jobs. It’s a safe assumption that the vast majority are more skilled and much more knowledgeable than the average Dick’s associate. They don’t deserve to be out of work right now. They’re talented guys who were in the wrong place.

What I’m suggesting is that Dick’s had a plan…and it wasn’t a particularly good one. The Big box business doesn’t need much in the way of professional anything, at least not at the ground level.

It’s reasonable to assume that the idea to staff PGA Professionals was conceived with the belief that by offering custom fitting (your actual mileage with that will vary) and other services (club repair, regripping) more commonly associated with Green Grass and mom and pop golf businesses, Dick’s could take an even bigger chunk out of the ass of the little guy…and the club pro too.

Credentialed PGA Professionals would add authenticity to Dick’s golf business. They would legitimize the money grab.

Dick’s misread the market and its own customer base.
post #188 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by tye203 View Post

Golf participation and ratings soared during tigers top years. He moved the visual tv needle does golf have another star like that? I think Rory could possible be that person. Not for diversity but just playing top level golf.

 

The young Mr. Woods was a perfect storm that isn't likely to occur again anytime soon, and such a storm certainly can't be manufactured.

 

He looked like nobody else, had a background like nobody else and struck the ball like nobody else. He was a freak show.

 

Even if McIlroy were to dominate like Woods did in his prime, he wouldn't draw that type of attention. The other factors aren't present.

post #189 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by MS256 View Post
 

 

There could be benefit beyond the obvious 15% if it attracts one or more members of a family out shopping. I know anytime our family ever went shopping when we got to the store we all went our separate ways to the departments we were interested in. I might or might not buy an item or two but could pretty much bet the rest of the family was going to have a shopping cart full when we met back up at the cash register.

 

Take away one of those departments and maybe the family chooses another store to shop.

 

This is a good reason we go to Dick's.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post


[/B]

It's a shame there aren't any of those out there these days...... b3_huh.gif

 

Is a commentary on older perceptions of youth? There are plenty of charismatic younger people, they just don't play golf. The only young popular person who plays that I know of is Justin Timberlake.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunther View Post


Ok, I'm with you on points 1 and 3 but diversity? You mean white kids choose to play hoops because they might meet some black kids? Don't think so. Now, would it be nice if there were more diversity, sure, but I don't believe that's a factor in what a kid gravitates towards.

And, depending on where you play, you can have all kinds of diversity. There's a Thursday/Saturday group that plays at Cedar Crest in Dallas. I play with them from time to time. About 30 guys and my buddy, me and 2 others are the only white guys. I enjoy those rounds and usually get my ass kicked.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tye203 View Post

When I say diversity it's not just black and white it's through all social classes. Make the game accessible to as many people as possible and you will grow the sport.

 

I think if golf courses are filled with more types of people, it would indicate that more types of people are welcome. Where I play, I meet all kinds of people on the "Open to Public" courses. The private courses are pretty homogenous, and it does not look like the type of place that welcomes everyone, which they don't. Many younger people tend to gravitate towards places where everyone is "welcome" or even if it only appears that way from seeing a diversity of people.

 

My aunt has lived in the UK for quite some time, and has the general feeling that everyone can play golf there. The reason is because most of the people she knows plays. Her perception (right or wrong) is that in the Unites States it is a richer persons sport.

 

If you go to Asia that perception would probably be even more reinforced that golf is only for the wealthy. This is, in fact, why so many Asian immigrants to the United States are playing golf here. It is perceived as a rich man's sport in Asia, and given the opportunity to play here, they do.

 

Most people do not perceive golf to be what it is. Good exercise and a nice walk through a park like setting.

 

 

If they make it such that families are welcome onto the course, and provide a sufficient enough discount for families, then many more people would go onto the course. Basically, any families can treat it as a relaxing outing where finishing the entire round and scoring is not the main objective. Picnics on the course would be more commonplace.

 

The main objective would be a fun day out for the family.

 

Pace of play is going to be an issue when you let families onto the course, but it would definitely attract more people.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunther View Post


Mmm, that kind of leaks into your first point on affordability. There's tons of diversity in golf in Dallas, and I suspect most cities. Just depends where you play. For some reason, however, that diversity doesn't translate to the pro tours.

If Tiger couldn't crack that nut, I'm not sure it can be fixed. The First Tee seems to be helping although not to any obvious degree yet. Perhaps in time...

 

It's working pretty well in our area with over 2000 kids playing golf as a result of this program. Families follow, but like many said it's not affordable.

 

Actually, this entire topic should probably be moved to the "Golf in Decline" thread.

post #190 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by ditchparrot19 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tye203 View Post

Golf participation and ratings soared during tigers top years. He moved the visual tv needle does golf have another star like that? I think Rory could possible be that person. Not for diversity but just playing top level golf.

 

The young Mr. Woods was a perfect storm that isn't likely to occur again anytime soon, and such a storm certainly can't be manufactured.

 

He looked like nobody else, had a background like nobody else and struck the ball like nobody else. He was a freak show.

 

Even if McIlroy were to dominate like Woods did in his prime, he wouldn't draw that type of attention. The other factors aren't present.

I am thinking it will take an American born player who can dominate golf like Woods did to bring a shot of life back into American golf. 

post #191 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

 

 

 

Is a commentary on older perceptions of youth? There are plenty of charismatic younger people, they just don't play golf. The only young popular person who plays that I know of is Justin Timberlake.

 

 

 

 

Perhaps I misunderstood the post, but I interpreted @tye203's post to mean young, charismatic, pro golfers, of which there are many these days!

post #192 of 266
If I had the money I would play golf everyother day during the summer. Lol the public course close to me range from $25 (twilight price) - $75 a round. I'm a 34 year old teacher with 2 kids so I have to watch my money. I play with my dad in his town were it's $17 for non residents and sometimes the person looks out and gives me the $10 resident rate. Lol when I go to dick to shop for training and work out gear I shop exclusively on the clearance rack and use coupons. I wear nike tennis dri fit polo's. Most nike golf polo's the sleeves are too long so I shop for them on ebay. I guess I'm from the digital age but I have gotten my putter fitted at a pro shop and plan to get lessons at one. Personal interaction does matter for certain purchases.
post #193 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdgolfpro View Post

Sorry for the rant, been a shitty day and I don't appreciate the comments I have read online about golf pros at Dick's all day

Sorry to hear that. I was unemployed for 7 months not too long ago and it has (and is still) made my life very difficult. Good luck to you.

post #194 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

Perhaps I misunderstood the post, but I interpreted @tye203
's post to mean young, charismatic, pro golfers, of which there are many these days!

My first thought was that all the pro golfers are young, so I was kind of wondering what he meant.

Are there any charismatic ones?
post #195 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by motsco View Post

one thing that these big box company's are missing is point of sales. every time I have been in a hitting bay and say if I'm not hitting good they will try to give advise which is nice, but I think they should train the staff to try to sell lessons. only once has a GG employee ask me if I took leasons and when I responded yes I have a instructor that was it he didn't say anything else, my thinking a good salesperson would reply without prying something like "you know we have one of the finest pros at this store you should give him a try" even if I did not except I would have it in my mind to maybe try.

 

 

 

I wonder if that is even ethical.  Most professions hace codes of conduct and frequently one of the big no nos is making an unsolicited pitch to take over the client of the other guy.

 

Q for @iacas:  Is there a PGA pro code of conduct?  Would the kind of solicitation described by motsco violate that code of conduct?  Or might this fill into some kind of unwritten rule that PGA pros follow?  It seems a little crappy to me for one PGA pro to solicit someone already taking lessons from a different pro .

post #196 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

Just that many people in a large corporation care more about their careers than what they are actually supposed to be doing. In many cases, people manipulate the system in order propel their personal gain rather than being good at what they do. The only issue is some of the more skillful and harder working individuals get sidelined by people who are better at playing politics.

So, people should put their employers wants ahead of what's best for their careers?

Maybe in a utopian society people would advanced based solely on merit but generally employers aren't making decisions based on what's best for their employees.

In other words, in lots of instances both employers and employees are putting their interests first.
post #197 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by RFKFREAK View Post

So, people should put their employers wants ahead of what's best for their careers?

Maybe in a utopian society people would advanced based solely on merit but generally employers aren't making decisions based on what's best for their employees.

In other words, in lots of instances both employers and employees are putting their interests first.

Well, these people applied for a job with their employers, so it seems reasonable that they do the things for which they were hired.
post #198 of 266
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

Well, these people applied for a job with their employers, so it seems reasonable that they do the things for which they were hired.

In a big corporate company where most employees are faceless names and the company makes decisions without taking employees into consideration, I think the notion that an employee shouldn't put what's best for their careers first and instead put the employers needs above all else is irresponsible of the employee.
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