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European Ryder Cup team - Page 5

post #73 of 134

First of all, I would be very, very surprised if SuperJoost would receive a wild card. His game is fading a bit recently, in the big tournaments his performance wasn't A+. Long story short, there are better players out there. He has some advantages. He can play a links course (won the KLM Open on a links course), although he isn't the longest player, he has steady iron play, his putting, which was his weakest point, improved. But in the end, even if he wins next week Italian Open, he won't get a card. He has a good season, but not good enough. He has to put some steady mileage under his feet, with some steady performances in highly rated tournaments. In my view, that is.

 

The US media (f.i. Van Sickle) is heavily downplaying the US chances. Which strikes me a bit. I feel that European players can play better on different courses. The US players seem to have some problems to cope with the European courses. The US courses to me are pretty much the same. Week in, week out. Tight, small fairways, high, dense rough. The European courses differ per country. But the US players seem to come to form. They have top notch players. Why should Bradley bring less fire to a team than Poulter? Reed might revitalise, Mahan is on song, Furyk (with a bad record), Fowler are playing well. Todd might be a good pick.

 

I am not so sure that Europe will slaughter the US. Could be much, much closer.

 

I wonder if Watson would pick Woods as an assistant. TW might bring some fire here and there.  

post #74 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxgolf View Post
 

First of all, I would be very, very surprised if SuperJoost would receive a wild card. His game is fading a bit recently, in the big tournaments his performance wasn't A+. Long story short, there are better players out there. He has some advantages. He can play a links course (won the KLM Open on a links course), although he isn't the longest player, he has steady iron play, his putting, which was his weakest point, improved. But in the end, even if he wins next week Italian Open, he won't get a card. He has a good season, but not good enough. He has to put some steady mileage under his feet, with some steady performances in highly rated tournaments. In my view, that is.

 

The US media (f.i. Van Sickle) is heavily downplaying the US chances. Which strikes me a bit. I feel that European players can play better on different courses. The US players seem to have some problems to cope with the European courses. The US courses to me are pretty much the same. Week in, week out. Tight, small fairways, high, dense rough. The European courses differ per country. But the US players seem to come to form. They have top notch players. Why should Bradley bring less fire to a team than Poulter? Reed might revitalise, Mahan is on song, Furyk (with a bad record), Fowler are playing well. Todd might be a good pick.

 

I am not so sure that Europe will slaughter the US. Could be much, much closer.

 

I wonder if Watson would pick Woods as an assistant. TW might bring some fire here and there.  

All well and good, but The Centenary course is an inland course designed by noted American J. Nicklaus, the US team should feel right at home.

post #75 of 134

Well, time will tell. I do not think that just because Nicklaus built it, the US would play better.

post #76 of 134

After 52 weeks and thousands of hours of golf, the race to make Paul McGinley’s European team for the upcoming Ryder Cup at Gleneagles will reach its denouement at this week’s 71° Open d’Italia Presented by DAMIANI.

With the nine automatic qualification places set to be determined on Sunday evening – four from the European Points List and five from the World Points List – McGinley knows that Ryder Cup D-Day is fast approaching.

“This is the last lap of qualifying for The Ryder Cup and from the World Points angle this tournament could make a contribution,” said the Irishman who is at Circolo Golf Torino this week to also compete himself after a number of weeks on the sidelines nursing a shoulder injury. 

All eyes will be on Stephen Gallacher, the Scot needing to finish in the top two to force his way past Graeme McDowell into the final qualifying place, but the likes of Joost Luiten and Francesco Molinari will be among those hoping to impress McGinley in this final week as he weighs up his wild card options.

It has been a lengthy process since the qualification began at the Celtic Manor Resort during the ISPS Handa Wales Open 12 months ago, with the golfing cream rising to the top over that period.

On Tuesday September 2, McGinley will finalise the 12-man squad which will take on the United States in Perthshire from September 26-28, as the 47 year old names his three Captain’s Picks in the ballroom at Wentworth Club.

“I think a lot of what happens with the nine automatic qualifiers determines where you go with your picks,” said the captain.

 “But it’s important that we have players who are on form – which I think the qualification process will provide. It’ll identify the leading nine European players throughout the world over a 12 month period and then it’s up to me and my vice captains to complete the jigsaw."

Of course, as someone once said, with great power comes great responsibility and McGinley is acutely aware that some of the aspects of September 2 will be more testing than others.

“Being a Ryder Cup captain, there are good bits of the job and there’s bad bits,” he continued. “And everybody has talked about how difficult it is calling guys, particularly friends of yours, to tell them they haven’t made the team.

“That’s going to be difficult, I know it is. But I’ve been very upfront with them, they know where they stand, and I’ve tried to be very open and transparent with where I was going with the picks and it was up to the players to show me some form and some reason why they should be picked.”

Since being made captain 19 months ago, the meticulous Irishman has traversed the world, delved into form guides, statistics, the Ryder Cup history books and more, but the preparation period is almost over.

With little more than four weeks left before the first ball is struck at Gleneagles, this week – and next week’s wild card announcements – represent the culmination of hundreds of hours of hard work.

“Once the picks are made, that’s a significant milestone in terms of the captaincy,” reflected McGinley. “You then have 12 players in place which enables you to start thinking seriously about tactics, about strategy. You start communicating with the players on a lot more of an individual level than you’ve done before.

“Before it was generic but after September 2 it’s right down to the nitty-gritty of when you’re arriving, what practice rounds you’re going to play and who your potential partners could be. It’s exciting.”


Read more at http://www.europeantour.com/europeantour/season=2014/tournamentid=2014068/news/newsid=233500.html#CD60IRiYZ1zfiWGD.99

post #77 of 134

JUST Announced!
 

Paul McGinley has spoken...here are the 12 men that will attempt to win the Ryder Cup for Team Europe at Gleneagles!

Rory McIlroy
Henrik Stenson
Sergio Garcia
Justin Rose
Martin Kaymer
Thomas Bjorn
Victor Dubisson
Jamie Donaldson
Graeme McDowell
Lee Westwood
Ian Poulter
Stephen Gallacher

post #78 of 134
Gallacher, Westwood and Poulter picked by McGinley. Bah, not happy with Westwood at all: 19th on European Points List, 16th at Word Points List: a lot of other players (Donald, Jimenez, Molinari, Luiten) deserved it more than Westwood.
post #79 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent View Post

Gallacher, Westwood and Poulter picked by McGinley. Bah, not happy with Westwood at all: 19th on European Points List, 16th at Word Points List: a lot of other players (Donald, Jimenez, Molinari, Luiten) deserved it more than Westwood.

Agreed, and Poulter only gets on because of previous Ryder Cups, well at least he put up a respectable final round yesterday. That's encouraging. 

 

In the end though, I'm not surprised by his picks. 

post #80 of 134
Starting to like US chances a little better. Not predicting a W but don't think it'll be 24-4, as I was concerned about a month ago or so. Should be competitive...and fun to watch.
post #81 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunther View Post

Starting to like US chances a little better. Not predicting a W but don't think it'll be 24-4, as I was concerned about a month ago or so. Should be competitive...and fun to watch.
It won't be a blow out but I'm feeling the Euros have more mojo.
post #82 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunther View Post

Starting to like US chances a little better. Not predicting a W but don't think it'll be 24-4, as I was concerned about a month ago or so. Should be competitive...and fun to watch.


Every Ryder Cup in the modern era is awfully close to a coin flip. I mean, look at who won the PGA Tour event yesterday. I'm not sure many people would have picked Kirk to win after the third round.

 

The talent pool is so deep these days, you'd have to royally screw things up to get away from being a coin flip.

 

Consider the huge "blowout" in 2004: 18.5 to 9.5.

 

If the U.S. wins only five more of the 28 matches, they win the Ryder Cup. That's under 20%. When you consider points like that it takes on a different feel - one point gained by one team is a one point loss by the other, so every "swing" is doubled.

post #83 of 134
Thread Starter 

America leads 43.5 to 40.5 in the last three matches

 

If you take out the two big wins (Oakland Hills and the K Club) going back to 1989 its 141 - 139, yet Europe leads the series 7-4-1 during that period

 

Personally, I'd have taken a chance on Donald over Gallacher. You know Luke's top end performance threshold is higher than Stephen's, and despite the fact that selecting Gallacher will be reported as a gamble, I tend to think it's actually the safety first option

 

One thing that has stood up throughout his hiatus is Luke's putting. He's still 11th on strokes gained putting, and 26th in putts per round. It's perhaps a bit too simplistic to say that he'd be a top 10 player if someone else could hit his approach shots, but in foursomes of course, that's more or less what does happen. 

 

This particular dynamic could actually be exacerbated at Gleneagles given the way the par 4's are distributed. If Luke (or any perceived putting specialist) tees-off at the odd numbered holes, they'll be the lead putter if the green is hit in regulation on 14 of the 18 holes. I should say the fourteenth is a driveable par 4 and I've reallocated it, whereas the 2nd, 16th, and 18th are par 5's that should be reached with the second shot but I'm counting them as a bonus. If they're played in regulation however, it's even conceivable in foursomes that if every 3-4 footer is conceded, the person teeing off the even number holes wouldn't be required to get their putter out until the eighth hole

 

I'd have been tempted to restrict Luke (who only has Poulter and Palmer above him on the all-time win percentage list) to foursomes and reunite him with Garcia whom he's 4-1-0 with. I reckon he could have been managed in match play where one horrible clunker only costs you one hole. 

 

The par 3's come on 4th, 6th, 10th (14th) & 17th

 

The par 4's run 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 8th, 11th, 12th, 13th, (14th) 15th

 

I was having a chat with a few folk the other day actually as to whether the 11th might be another driveable par 4. 

 

The 10th at the Belfry was 290yds back in the mid 1980's. If Googleearth is right (and it is incredibly accurate) then the 11th at Gleneagles is 315 yds to the front. It's on a dog-leg so would require a left hander to shape something of a hook on a prevailing south westerly we felt

post #84 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarawayFairways View Post

America leads 43.5 to 40.5 in the last three matches

If you take out the two big wins (Oakland Hills and the K Club) going back to 1989 its 141 - 139, yet Europe leads the series 7-4-1 during that period

Personally, I'd have taken a chance on Donald over Gallacher. You know Luke's top end performance threshold is higher than Stephen's, and despite the fact that selecting Gallacher will be reported as a gamble, I tend to think it's actually the safety first option

One thing that has stood up throughout his hiatus is Luke's putting. He's still 11th on strokes gained putting, and 26th in putts per round. It's perhaps a bit too simplistic to say that he'd be a top 10 player if someone else could hit his approach shots, but in foursomes of course, that's more or less what does happen. 

This particular dynamic could actually be exacerbated at Gleneagles given the way the par 4's are distributed. If Luke (or any perceived putting specialist) tees-off at the odd numbered holes, they'll be the lead putter if the green is hit in regulation on 14 of the 18 holes. I should say the fourteenth is a driveable par 4 and I've reallocated it, whereas the 2nd, 16th, and 18th are par 5's that should be reached with the second shot but I'm counting them as a bonus. If they're played in regulation however, it's even conceivable in foursomes that if every 3-4 footer is conceded, the person teeing off the even number holes wouldn't be required to get their putter out until the eighth hole

Disagree - I think it was key to get a Scot on the team, not to mention Gallacher's stellar play over the past couple weeks. And, his fellow Ryder Cuppers talking him up on Twitter. Donald for Westwood? That would have been more reasonable.
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post


Every Ryder Cup in the modern era is awfully close to a coin flip. I mean, look at who won the PGA Tour event yesterday. I'm not sure many people would have picked Kirk to win after the third round.

The talent pool is so deep these days, you'd have to royally screw things up to get away from being a coin flip.

Consider the huge "blowout" in 2004: 18.5 to 9.5.

If the U.S. wins only five more of the 28 matches, they win the Ryder Cup. That's under 20%. When you consider points like that it takes on a different feel - one point gained by one team is a one point loss by the other, so every "swing" is doubled.
Understand, and agree. 24-4 was a bit of hyperbole but I did think it would be a blowout a few weeks ago, feeling better about things today.
post #85 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by FarawayFairways View Post

 

Personally, I'd have taken a chance on Donald over Gallacher. You know Luke's top end performance threshold is higher than Stephen's, and despite the fact that selecting Gallacher will be reported as a gamble, I tend to think it's actually the safety first option

 

 

Gallacher knows the Gleneagles course better than anyone from either team. Even if he ends up playing poorly...he has the ability to give helpful tips here and there to the other Euro players. Also at this point I can't see Luke playing THAT much better. Luke could have been picked over Westwood though. 

post #86 of 134
Donald over Westwood, absolutely.
post #87 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silent View Post

Donald over Westwood, absolutely.
Nah. Donald has had a shitty year. Westwood has too, but he's had a couple solid finishes lately.
post #88 of 134

It's too bad Bernhard doesn't play just a little bit more on the PGA/European tour. Would love to see if he can hang with the big guns on any course besides Augusta. 

post #89 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by RJH999 View Post


Nah. Donald has had a shitty year. Westwood has too, but he's had a couple solid finishes lately.

 

I really can't get excited about Westwood. Being slightly cynical, I fully expect him to have some "solid finishes" in the Ryder Cup, too - most likely shaking an American's hand on the 15th or 16th green and congratulating him on his win. I'd have gone with Donald, instead, any day of the week.

post #90 of 134

Donald's driving stats - including distance (and GIR) have gotten worse under Chuck Cook ... someone tell Tiger.

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