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How confident are golf ball companies really??? - Page 3

post #37 of 59
Thread Starter 

In case people think I'm hating on Titleist, I'm not. I play almost all Taylormade products except my putter is odyssey. and i know that Taylormade and Odyssey are both just as bad as Titleist. TM clains to have the number 1 driver on tour (might not make it the best driver) and Odyssey is the #1 putter on tour(again might not make it the best putter). A few years back i never even liked Taylormade or Callaway. I tried a set of callaway clubs, were good just didn't like the look. then had a set of AP2's i bought off a friend, loved those but they were out of my league so I gave them away. bought a used set of KZG mc-ii those were ok. then I swapped my cally's for TM tour preferred in hopes to trade towards a set of wilson FG tour v2 (used) but i just really liked the look and feel of the TM irons so I stuck with them. Odyssey just took a few putts with a friends white ice and i was hooked I love the pretty soft insert that they use and I like the look of the #9

post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by boogielicious View Post
 

I would argue that a Pro player will only use the best ball for him, regardless of brand.  These guys are trying to make a living.  They would not use a ball that did not give them the best chance at success.

 

Did Tiger or Rory start out playing with Titleist balls then switch when they became sponsored by Nike?

 

If they switched, maybe they switched because Nike is a better ball?

 

Or maybe because of the millions of dollars?

post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ay33660 View Post
 

 

Did Tiger or Rory start out playing with Titleist balls then switch when they became sponsored by Nike?

 

If they switched, maybe they switched because Nike is a better ball?

 

Or maybe because of the millions of dollars?


I just did a quick google on this..   In 2012, Rory was playing the Pro V1x.   In 2014, he is playing the Nike RZN Black.   I think it's a safe bet he switched balls because Nike is paying him handsomely to play their equipment.  The fact he won 2 majors using that ball goes directly to the assertion that the pros play what they are paid to play AND I think it also goes to show that the field is pretty level when it comes to tour level balls....

 

I think the assumption that a pro is going to use only that equipment which gives him/her the best chance to win because they are trying to make a living, is actually combining two different (and distinct) things.   The pro is definitely trying to make a living but that living comes from endorsements as much as (or more than) it does wins.  So, while wins initially get him/her the endorsement contracts, those contracts are ultimately going to provide the most steady source of income and thus, they will ultimately dictate what equipment the pro uses over the long term.


Edited by teamroper60 - 8/17/14 at 1:17am
post #40 of 59
Some years ago Tiger was making $10,000,000 from tournament prize money per year, his annual endorsements brought him over $90,000,000.
post #41 of 59

I play what I find in the woods, and a lot of times it's a ProV. I actually prefer the Titleist Tour Distance, B330S, 20XI-S to ProV because I like their feel.

 

I'm in the camp that most of these balls are pretty much on the same level.  

post #42 of 59

I doubt there is much of a difference between the top tier balls.  When a PGA Tour player switches sponsors and adopts a Nike or Callaway they still perform at the same level.  But give Titleist credit - they have the brand and tradition, sponsor many players, and in truth no ball is better (some may be as good) than the Prov1 series for the tour player.

post #43 of 59
Thread Starter 

So it is pretty safe to say that most of us agree that tour level balls are more or less the same. Yes one might be a touch softer one might spin a bit more or less but basically they're all the same and it comes down to either buying into the advertising they pump out or buying one cause you like a certain company more than another.

 

So taking this to the next level how well do the premium balls stack up to one another. For this section I think results will very due to skill level and players "bad" habits. This section is also not to be thought that a pro player will hit these balls but just your regular golfers from hard core to weekend warrior to couple times a month. main balls in topic but definitely not limited to; Bridgestone e series Titleist nxt, TaylorMade Project a...basically all premium balls generally ones found in a price range of $30-$35 a dozen. Top flite gamer is cheaper and yes still in this category.

 

So, who would like to weigh in first???

 

By the way, this has been really fun reading everyones thoughts so far.

post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrownCoast View Post
 

So it is pretty safe to say that most of us agree that tour level balls are more or less the same. Yes one might be a touch softer one might spin a bit more or less but basically they're all the same and it comes down to either buying into the advertising they pump out or buying one cause you like a certain company more than another.

 

So taking this to the next level how well do the premium balls stack up to one another. For this section I think results will very due to skill level and players "bad" habits. This section is also not to be thought that a pro player will hit these balls but just your regular golfers from hard core to weekend warrior to couple times a month. main balls in topic but definitely not limited to; Bridgestone e series Titleist nxt, TaylorMade Project a...basically all premium balls generally ones found in a price range of $30-$35 a dozen. Top flite gamer is cheaper and yes still in this category.

 

So, who would like to weigh in first???

 

By the way, this has been really fun reading everyones thoughts so far.


Using your listed balls and price point as the criteria, here is my experience:  I have played the Callaway Hex Chrome, Top Flite Gamer Tour (and Gamer), Titliest NXT Tour (and NXT) and the Bridgestone e5 & e6.   I don't like the Bridgestones e-series balls at all.   I don't get the same performance or feel from them as I do the others.   Beyond that, the Hex Chrome and Gamer Tour are the best all around performers for me. 

post #45 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by teamroper60 View Post
 


Using your listed balls and price point as the criteria, here is my experience:  I have played the Callaway Hex Chrome, Top Flite Gamer Tour (and Gamer), Titliest NXT Tour (and NXT) and the Bridgestone e5 & e6.   I don't like the Bridgestones e-series balls at all.   I don't get the same performance or feel from them as I do the others.   Beyond that, the Hex Chrome and Gamer Tour are the best all around performers for me. 

I've heard so many players say they really like the gamer balls from top flite, which says a lot about how it preforms since top flite isn't one of the big names in golf anymore. yes cally bridgestone titleist nike taylormade all make great premium balls but they are also the big names in golf these days. When so many players speak such high praise about a company that no longer contends with the big boys it really does say that the ball must preform. 

 

Currently I'm using the rocketballz urethane only cause I got them on sale for $15 a dozen. Not to say I don't like the way the ball preforms but I know I loose a lot of balls and would like to keep these for when I get a bit more control. However after hearing how well the gamer preforms and at the price point it is at I think I'm going to have to pick up a few dozen of the gamer soft.

post #46 of 59

I attended a marketing course and presentation for an unrelated sport equipment. This was about 10 years ago. Amongst other things there was some case studies,one of which included the proV1.

 

The conclusion was that 1 out of every 6 golf balls purchased was a proV1 and what made this very unique was that it was also the most expensive ball at the time- there are very few tangible items in the world that can make that claim with that market share.

post #47 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spitfisher View Post
 

I attended a marketing course and presentation for an unrelated sport equipment. This was about 10 years ago. Amongst other things there was some case studies,one of which included the proV1.

 

The conclusion was that 1 out of every 6 golf balls purchased was a proV1 and what made this very unique was that it was also the most expensive ball at the time- there are very few tangible items in the world that can make that claim with that market share.

I am not exactly sure what you are trying to say in all of this. To me it sounds like you are saying marketing by titleist as well as advertising has worked for them. It doesnt sound like any conclusion on actual quality of performance on the ball. Remember Britney Spears, Backstreet boys and all those type of bubble gum pop boy/girl bands have sold millions and millions of records. usually when they release an album they are around #1 on the chart. Does that mean they make the best music? They are the most talented singers? Best dancers?

post #48 of 59
Thread Starter 

Also, I wasn't trying to sound rude I just really didn't understand the context behind the post. The other thing about the 1 in 6 balls being bought was how many balls was it put up against and what were the other balls?

post #49 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spitfisher View Post
 

I attended a marketing course and presentation for an unrelated sport equipment. This was about 10 years ago. Amongst other things there was some case studies,one of which included the proV1.

 

The conclusion was that 1 out of every 6 golf balls purchased was a proV1 and what made this very unique was that it was also the most expensive ball at the time- there are very few tangible items in the world that can make that claim with that market share.


All that proves is that Titleist has the best reputation and/or marketing machine.   It really says nothing about the actual performance of the ball as compared to other tour level balls.   Gotta give them credit though, Titleist has managed to live (and thrive) for a very long time on the reputation they gained a long time ago.  

post #50 of 59

I never have cared much for Titleist golf balls. Years ago, when I was a caddie, I would find a couple of the balata-covered Titleists a week going through the woods to the caddie shack. I would save them up until I had a half dozen, and then use them to play.

 

They cut easy - I could cut one back then with an off-center driver shot.

 

Fast-forward to today: the ProV and ProV1 just spin too much for me, a 24 HDCP. I do better with the midspin balls such as TopFlite Gamer and Callaway Supersoft, which stay in the fairway better than the highspins. Midspin also helps because I play chip and run more than most people, and the superspin balls check up too quickly when I want runout. Also, the midspins are smoother for putting than the high spin balls.

 

And, I can buy two boxes of Gamers or Supersofts for less than one box of ProV family.

 

If you feel fulfilled by playing ProV or ProV1, go for it. Just don't waste a thread on it.

 

Early New Year's Resolution for 2015: Let's omit the annual "why I love Titleist" thread.

post #51 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post
Early New Year's Resolution for 2015: Let's omit the annual "why I love Titleist" thread.

Damn that would be a nice change of pace!!  I already know the Pro V is a damn good ball and that many people swear by it, so I don't need another thread telling me how it is the number 1 ball on tour.....  The commercials on the golf channel will suffice, thank you very much..

post #52 of 59
I used to play with Pinnacle Exceptions and I really liked them. It's been quite a while since I played with one so I'm not sure how much my tastes have changed since then (if any).

I assume they are still making them?
post #53 of 59
I would say that if I am in the sticks looking for a ball, or looking for someone else's ball, I find a ton of proV's and I hardly ever find any other brands of tour level or top tier balls. Marketing in golf is like racing, win on Sunday, sell on Monday.


I don't mind playing other top tier balls as long as spin is fairly consistent but rarely get the chance to play another top tier balls.
post #54 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Valleygolfer View Post

I would say that if I am in the sticks looking for a ball, or looking for someone else's ball, I find a ton of proV's and I hardly ever find any other brands of tour level or top tier balls. Marketing in golf is like racing, win on Sunday, sell on Monday.


I don't mind playing other top tier balls as long as spin is fairly consistent but rarely get the chance to play another top tier balls.


I doubt if 1 out of 5 balls I find at our course are Pro V1s. Most likely right now are low compression Wilsons, lost by the groups of seniors that play a few times a week, followed by Bridgestone, other Titleists, and Tailormade.

 

On the other hand a guy from a nearby country club told me when they cleaned out one of the ponds at least 8 out of 10 were Pro V1s. (More wealthy people play there).   

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