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Evertything goes high, right, and short - Page 2

post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 
Well stretching is something that I can do outside of focusing on the swing.

I'm naturally more comfortable with an upright two piece or two plane swing so that's not something that feels awkward.

For now I am going to focus on keeping the club face more closed on the backswing and rolling over the forearms. Those will be my two main things to work on although as you know those two things have multiple elements.
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fromthecoast View Post

Well stretching is something that I can do outside of focusing on the swing.

I'm naturally more comfortable with an upright two piece or two plane swing so that's not something that feels awkward.

For now I am going to focus on keeping the club face more closed on the backswing and rolling over the forearms. Those will be my two main things to work on although as you know those two things have multiple elements.

The gentle response would be "this requires massive amounts of timing".

The tough love response would be "this sounds like a recipe for disaster".

Question - did the instructor take video? High speed video?
post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 

And it may not be that I have to roll over the forearms as much as I might need to "feel" that way. Right now I am holding off all they way through. I may not have to actually roll the forearms as much as just finish my swing properly. 

 

We did take video, but not high speed. 

post #22 of 25

It sounds like you are slicing the ball (not pushing shots). The first thing and easiest thing to check is your grip as we want to make sure you aren't playing with a weak grip that could be keeping your clubface open. Check to make sure that the Vs that form between your forefinger and thumb of each hand are aligned parallel to each other and are both pointing somewhere between your right ear and your right shoulder. If your grip is solid and you are aligned square to your target (and your shoulders are not open) then we need to get you working on some swing plane drills to get your golf club down to the inside of the ball. 

I'm going to give you a couple drills here to get started on. Give them a try for a week or so and see if you don't start to see some improvement. 

Description: The Swing Plane Poles Drill helps diagnose an outside-in or inside-out path error as the cause for the slices (outside-in) or pushed shots (excessively inside-out) .

Summary:

1.                              If you are able to determine if  your swing is too far inside-out or if it's too far outside-in coming into the ball, driveway poles are very usefull.

2.                              If you are swinging too far inside-out coming into the ball place a pole just outside your ball and twelve inches forward on the same plane as your shaft at address. Avoid hitting it after impact.

3.                              If you are swinging too far outside-in, place a pole just outside your ball and twelve inches back. Avoid hitting it on your downswing.



 



Description: The Dropping Drill is designed to help those that chronically slice the ball because they come over the top. It teaches how to get the club down to the inside and on plane. 

Summary:

1.                              Start with a mid or short iron at first. As you get comfortable this drill can even be done with your longer clubs including the driver. Go ahead and set up to the ball as you normally would and swing to the top of your backswing.

2.                              From here, let your arms feel like they are free falling straight down. While keeping your back at the target allow your club to drop all the way to the ground. You should make a nice "thud" sound with your clubhead when it contacts the ground. It should hit the ground approximately between the ball and heel of your foot. The key is to not let it get in front of your toes.

3.                              From here, again, don't move your back and bring your arms back up to the top of the swing. Repeat the process a second time so that your club dumps into the ground again at the same spot. On the 3rd repetition when your arms and club start to drop and reach about waist high, then turn your back and shoulders away from the target. Be patient to make sure you start the arm drop first before you start turning towards your target.

4.                              With enough repetition with this exaggerated drill you will learn to drop your club down on an inside plane.

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gboroman View Post
 

My suggestion is to feel like you are taking the club back with the right hand.  At the top, feel like the right wrist is cupping, like you are holding a serving tray.  This will pull the left wrist into a bowed position.  Additionally (or alternatively) you can also try hinging your wrists earlier in the takeaway.  A full length mirror is useful to look at your wrist position at the top.  Ideally, you want a flat left wrist at the top, but you might want to try the bowed left wrist while you work on the problem.

 

On the downswing, make sure you aren't releasing too early (casting).  To do this, just do a pump drill before you hit - bring the butt of the club down towards the ball and the right elbow to the right hip, then back to the top, then complete your swing. 

 

If you find it's not the wrist cup or cast that's causing the issue, make sure you are getting onto your left side to initiate your downswing.  Hanging back on your right side even for a split second too long can cause the same ball flight.


This is great advice, especially the serving tray wrist motion. I would only add that you make sure you are fully releasing the club at impact and beyond, you may have to be deliberate in the release to feel like you are slapping or whipping the ball at impact. The serving tray is the set up and the release will give you the power and trajectory. Also, if you feel like you start your takeaway with your arms and not your torso, reverse it. Don't try to muscle it on the downswing and you'll be in good shape.

post #24 of 25
Thread Starter 
I will definitely look at some of the advice suggested above. I played this weekend and made some interesting observations.

I switched back to some more SGI irons instead of the J40 dual pockets that I've been playing (probably better clubs that I should be playing but damn they are good looking) and j also purchased and wore a swing glove to rule out cupping as an issue.

Even though my score did not reflect it, my iron play was overall pretty good and I only had a few shots that I was disappointed with. I left with the driver on every hole but had good contact and a ball flight that made me happy. My chipping, pitching, and putting were absolutely horrendous cause my score to go though the roof.

I was somewhere around my usual expected distances with the SGI irons. I think the offset really helped me the most. I still had some fade but not nearly as much with the irons and the driver was mostly draws with a few baby fades here and there when I didn't finish my swing correctly.


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post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fromthecoast View Post
 

 All my iron shots and most of my driver shots are going very high, right, and several clubs short.

I use a four-knuckle grip and never, ever, have hit the kind of shot you describe.  A strong grip keeps the face squarer to the arc longer, making it easier to return the face square to the ball at impact.

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