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Help me prepare for walking - Page 2

post #19 of 45
As someone who normally walks and carries my bag (I watched someone freshman year get practically laughed off the range at a high school tournament for having a cart, but that's a discussion for some other thread) for all my tournaments, there are a couple things that will make you a lot happier. Here's a couple do's and don't when walking and carrying:

DO:
- Carry a small umbrella and light raincoat in your bag. You don't have a cart to take cover under, and these add very little weight compared to the benefit in a storm
- Get a comfortable bag that is lightweight and easy to pick up. Something similar to the Sun Mountain Three 5 bag, which is light with a good strap, is ideal.
- Make sure your bag has a pocket for a water bottle, preferably insulated, so that you can easily store it and carry it with you on the course.
- Make sure your golf shoes do not rub your feet weird when you walk, or you'll have an adjustment period before you create calluses.
- Set the bag down whenever you can. If someone else is starting their routine, set it down quietly. If you will stand in a spot for more than 15 seconds, just go ahead and set it down.
- Walk straight to your ball (even slightly past others') and set your bag down to wait for your turn whenever possible. In high-school tournaments the general rule is stay out of a 30* cone in front of people when doing so, but do so at your own risk and stay aware.
- Set the bag down between the flag and the next teebox when you are putting, it saves a lot of time.

DON'T
- Carry too much weight. Old yardage book? Toss it! The same goes for extra balls (you shouldn't need a full dozen) and various widgets that invariably make their way into a pocket somewhere.
- Carry with only one strap. Unless you're moving it a short distance (think 20' or less) you should put both shoulder straps on. It's more comfortable and it saves your back.
- Look for golf balls while carrying a bag. If you need to look for a ball (yours or another player's), set the bag down first. Why walk extra with the bag when you don't need to?


Basically just keep the weight of the bag down and minimize the time that it's on your back to the time you spend walking between shots and you'll be fine. That said, a pushcart is an excellent option if you can fit it within your budget. I would absolutely use one if I was able to in tournaments, it provides the benefit of a caddy carrying for you without the extra cost per round.
post #20 of 45

A push/pull cart, and a great pair of comfortable walking shoes. They don't even need to be actual golf shoes. Just make sure the soles do not cause damage to the greens.

 

Also unless you have been walking/exercising prior to your golf walk, be prepared to feel out of shape the first few, plus, times you do take a stroll on the links. If you get fatigued, it will adversely effect your play. Don't worry too much about your score until you know you can walk 3-5 miles, pushing, or pulling several pounds.  

 

Weather is going to be something you are going to need to be aware of  too. Where I play, taking plenty of water is a must. I don't use sports drinks, but I do add lemon juice to my water supply.  If you play in a warmer than normal climate you might think about starting your hydration process the day before. Also, have some snacks handy to keep your energy level up. Fruit is a good choice.  I'd stay away from sodas with caffeine, and alcohol, especially in warmer climates. All that said, if you are just out to have fun, drink types in non excess, are not a big deal.  

 

If you leave your cart, and walk to a ball, take more clubs with you so you will have the right one when do get to your ball. Most of the time, I just wheel my cart right up to the ball. Then again I hike 10s of miles a week in addition to my golf walks. Leaving a cart to walk to a ball saves energy. 

 

Watch where you are walking to avoid tweaked ankles, knees, and/or falls. Most golf course have several, hidden ankle breakers waiting for a victim. Probably should watch for crawling critters too if your course has them.  

 

Last but not least, walk at what ever your normal walking pace is, don't change it for the golf course. My belief is that if a golfer tries to walk faster than normal, that golfer will also try and swing faster than they normally would, which again, will adversely effect their play. 

 

You will have more fun walking, and most likely play a more relaxed game. ;-)

post #21 of 45

I forgot to add the biggest thing I see people miss:

Park your pushcart/set your bag directly to the right (for a right handed player, the left for a lefty) of your ball. It saves an enormous amount of time compared to those who set them 15 feet behind the ball. You can do all your pre-shot planning right at the ball and grab your club from the bag right there, then hit it and put the club back without having to take more than two steps. It doesn't sound like much, but it speeds up play so much compared to people who have to walk back 15 feet to get a club, then walk back those 15 feet again to put the club back and grab the bag to start moving back forwards to take your next shot.

post #22 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by davechen View Post

Yes, a fast golfer in a cart is faster than a faster golfer walking.  But as a fast walker, I can't recall the last time I held up any cart golfer.  I've always played fast, ready golf and am often waiting for riders at the next tee because I can take short cuts.  I've walked 18 holes in 3 hours.

I haven't yet gone to a pull/push cart.  I still carry my clubs.  I like the old school feel of it, and I figure I can use the extra exercise.  I suppose at some point when I get older, I'll get a push cart, but I'm holding off on it while I still can.
Pushing my clic gear (with all my crap in it) along the fairway and the rough is plenty exercise trust me. I walked over the weekend with my Fitbit on my wrist and I logged 12,000plus steps and 8 miles, burning over 3600 calories on a flat course. All that and I didnt have the extra stress on my back.
post #23 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonTheSavage View Post


Pushing my clic gear (with all my crap in it) along the fairway and the rough is plenty exercise trust me. I walked over the weekend with my Fitbit on my wrist and I logged 12,000plus steps and 8 miles, burning over 3600 calories on a flat course. All that and I didnt have the extra stress on my back.

Yeah, if the course is hilly, pushing the cart up hills is no picnic. On one course I play, the 14th and 17th holes have huge upslopes right off the tee, so if there's a single riding a cart in our group and we hit the ball relatively near one another, I'll sometimes ask for a lift and just pull my pushcart along side the electric cart.

post #24 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by dkolo View Post

Yeah, if the course is hilly, pushing the cart up hills is no picnic.
Oh yeah there are a few hilly courses around that I flat out refuse to walk.
post #25 of 45
Also, I recommend a push cart over a pull cart. Pulling a cart behind you will put strain on your elbow. See the Fitness forum for more on elbow pain. a1_smile.gif

I need a new push cart. I've got it held together with duct tape, radiator hose clamps and JB Weld. a1_smile.gif I have inflatable tires that have gone flat on the course. One leg protrudes farther than the other causing it to veer hard to the left. And no umbrella holder.
post #26 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by RonTheSavage View Post


Pushing my clic gear (with all my crap in it) along the fairway and the rough is plenty exercise trust me. I walked over the weekend with my Fitbit on my wrist and I logged 12,000plus steps and 8 miles, burning over 3600 calories on a flat course. All that and I didnt have the extra stress on my back.

 

Fair enough.  Although going downhill with a push cart you can just let it go and it drives itself. :)

post #27 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by davechen View Post
 

 

Fair enough.  Although going downhill with a push cart you can just let it go and it drives itself. :)

You have to read the downslope like a putting green sometimes or you can lose your cart into the woods if it catches a sideslope haha.

post #28 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by davechen View Post

Fair enough.  Although going downhill with a push cart you can just let it go and it drives itself. :)
Yeah I guess, or you can hold on to it for fear that it might tip over going down a hill. Going downhill with a clicgear is no picnic either you have to hold on to the darn thing.
post #29 of 45

I'll echo what most others here have said.  I walk 27-36 holes every Saturday and Sunday in SW Georgia.  I normally go out around noon so it's can be very hot, below are my recommendations.

 

-Push cart. I use the Clicgear 3.5+

-Keep hydrated and drink plenty (I don't put anything in my water, as I approach the refill on hot days I'll dump the remaining water over my head or down my back before refilling.)

-Lightweight, wicking clothing

-I keep two towels, one I keep wet to help wipe my head and face to help keep cool.

-Comfortable shoes.  I use the Foot Joy M Project, most comfortable shoes I have ever worn.  I've taken them straight from the box to the course and they need no break-in.

-Pack good quality snacks.  I pack several snack bars and a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

-Don't try to walk fast, keep at a good comfortable walking pace.  Don't let people behind you push you, if need be let them play through.

post #30 of 45

As most have stated yes a push/pull cart is a great investment. I found that when I carried my bag on some rounds my back would stiffen up much quicker then it would with either riding or just using a push pull cart. make sure (if you have this problem as well) to take muscle/back relaxants. Lots of hydrating fluids and snacks. But like I said my number 1 thing I make sure I have is muscle/back relaxants. Given the heat you are dealing with I'd bring an extra water bottle and towel. Use them strictly for cooling off. I just dump some of the water on my head and use the extra towel to dry off a bit. (only do that while waiting for others to take their shot so you aren't slowing up the rest of your group.  

post #31 of 45
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all of the replies!

A lot of helpful information that I probably would have learned the hard way.

I'm going to go check out some push carts this weekend I think also.
post #32 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by mburton View Post

Thanks for all of the replies!

A lot of helpful information that I probably would have learned the hard way.

I'm going to go check out some push carts this weekend I think also.
Cool! Keep us posted
post #33 of 45

If you get the Clicgear the cooler attachment is a must, seems silly until you have one.

post #34 of 45

OP, I try to walk when I golf. For that purpose I have a pull cart. I bought it about 20 years ago so it has 2 wheels. I got it before the 3 wheeled carts became popular.

 

I would highly highly highly recommend that you pick up a 3 wheeled cart. I personally don't like my pull cart. Like was already posted, it causes stress on your elbow and wrist while pulling it and trying to maintain the balance point is just a pain in the butt. My bag also tends to rotate 90 degrees sideways when it's on the cart.

 

I'm lusting over a Clicgear 3.5. When I get one, my son will inherit my 2 wheeled pull cart. He's got to pay his dues if he wants to play with me. Besides, he's young and will think it's cool. At first.

post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by scorpion12 View Post
 

OP, I try to walk when I golf. For that purpose I have a pull cart. I bought it about 20 years ago so it has 2 wheels. I got it before the 3 wheeled carts became popular.

 

I would highly highly highly recommend that you pick up a 3 wheeled cart. I personally don't like my pull cart. Like was already posted, it causes stress on your elbow and wrist while pulling it and trying to maintain the balance point is just a pain in the butt. My bag also tends to rotate 90 degrees sideways when it's on the cart.

 

I'm lusting over a Clicgear 3.5. When I get one, my son will inherit my 2 wheeled pull cart. He's got to pay his dues if he wants to play with me. Besides, he's young and will think it's cool. At first.


Why don't you push it? It's just as easy to push a 2-wheeler as it is a 3-wheeler, apart from going up steep hills or over very uneven terrain. I guess it could be a model that's harder to push than pull, but unless that's the case you should just push it. Although I do agree that if buying a cart today everyone should buy a 3-wheeler (clicgear 3.5). :offtopic:

 

 

 

 

 

It can't be said enough how important it is to use comfortable shoes. You will ruin your feet before finishing the first round by walking if the shoes are even slightly uncomfortable on a normal (riding) round.

 

If you are going to check on push-carts remember to ignore the 4-wheel ones, they are a pain to push around compared to a 3-wheeled one.

post #36 of 45

Believe me ToblaT, I've tried to push it. It doesn't really lend itself to that and is somewhat difficult to control.

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