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Wedges: Scor v Vokey v 588 Rtx v MacDaddy 2...Best? - Page 2

post #19 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnull View Post


Thanks for your input, do you have experience with any of these wedges?

I have had Vokey, Mizuno, TM, Cleveland.

 

They're all the same. Just decide which ones you like the look of.

post #20 of 46

And Callaway x forged. 

Again - all good. All the same.

post #21 of 46

Take a look at "Fourteen" wedges. They are made in Japan and are usually two years ahead of the competition. They cost a little more ~$185 per wedge, but  they are great wedges. I have a 58* lob and it is phenomenal any where within 60 yards of the green (for me). You can select the grind that best fits you swings. I bought mine through a pro shop where I took chipping lessons. The Pro ground the wedge for me (based on my swing) and it slides through the turf like a hot knife through butter. This has become my go to club around the greens. I'm looking a get a 52* gap wedge as well. I Ping wedges just aren't getting it.

post #22 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hammer 4 View Post
 

Seriously, give these guy's a look see.   http://edelgolf.com/

 

I am planning on giving them a hard look when I decide to upgrade my wedges.  I would like to add a 64 degree to my collection of clubs, as I feel for certain courses I play it would be beneficial for me to have.  Currently I have PW, AW, 56 and 60 degree wedges.  I'm guessing my PW is somewhere around 48 degree and the AW somewhere around 52 although I don't know for sure. 

 

I was looking over the Edel fitting guide, and the issue for me is, I honestly don't know which "category" I fall under.  I do take divots with my wedges, but it depends on the course.  One course I play a lot is VERY soft conditions, just a little rain and the course is soggy... and I take HUGE divots with my wedges at that course.  I usually strike the ball fine with them, my divot is typically in front of where the ball was.  But on a more firm course, I probably take more of a normal sized divot.  Not all that deep, and not long.  So I really don't know which one to choose.

post #23 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris223 View Post

I was looking over the Edel fitting guide, and the issue for me is, I honestly don't know which "category" I fall under.  I do take divots with my wedges, but it depends on the course.

Get a fitting done. Then you will be sure that it's the right grind (and shaft and loft and lie) for you.
post #24 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post


Get a fitting done. Then you will be sure that it's the right grind (and shaft and loft and lie) for you.


Easier said than done no Edel fitter anywhere near me.  Unless you're referring to just a general fitting for wedges.

post #25 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorty View Post

I have had Vokey, Mizuno, TM, Cleveland.

They're all the same. Just decide which ones you like the look of.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shorty View Post

And Callaway x forged. 
Again - all good. All the same.

Yep. Add Scratch Golf to the list, but @Shorty's right....all are good. None are magic.
post #26 of 46
I don't get the fascination with spin.
post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave2512 View Post

I don't get the fascination with spin.
Spin is good. It helps stop the ball on the green so you can pitch it close. Most people could do with more spin, really.
post #28 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post


Spin is good. It helps stop the ball on the green so you can pitch it close. Most people could do with more spin, really.

 

I don't necessarily agree. 

 

A lot of mid-to-high hcp players see better players, and especially the pros spinning the heck out of wedge shots and think that more spin must be a good thing.  What they fail to realize is that spin can be a very tough thing to control, and adds another variable to your shot.  Even pros over-juice one on occasion, or the little 60 foot hop-and-stop releases and leaves them 15 feet coming back. 

 

IMHO most average golfers would be better off not trying to spin the heck out of the ball and simply learn how far the ball is going to release and run under various conditions, with different clubs.  Is a high-spinning shot useful?  Absolutely.  But the skill that it takes to play it consistently is high enough that the risk in playing it very often will out-weigh the benefit most of the time.  Lowest score wins, not necessarily the sexiest looking shot.  ;-)   It's also worth adding that spin, especially consistent spin, is much more a function of proper technique, than of the brand wedge that someone plays.

post #29 of 46

 I,ll put in my .02. Have a 50*, 56* and 60* used the 60* on one hole, every round, high flop.

Took it out, changed my shot to a low runner, much more accurate with a little practice and able to fill that spot with a longer club.

I am a high hcp, I need more distance, so the 60* was taking up much needed space, also I can hit drop and stop most of the time, so distance control was/is a high priority.

Backspin can be a detriment to your game.

 

+1 @David in FL

post #30 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post

Spin is good. It helps stop the ball on the green so you can pitch it close. Most people could do with more spin, really.

 

I too disagree.

 

Most people could do with more consistent spin rates, even if they're lower.

 

The average 10 handicapper is often surprised the few times he gets a ball to spin… and comes up 25 feet short. :P

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post

I don't necessarily agree. 

A lot of mid-to-high hcp players see better players, and especially the pros spinning the heck out of wedge shots and think that more spin must be a good thing.  What they fail to realize is that spin can be a very tough thing to control, and adds another variable to your shot.  Even pros over-juice one on occasion, or the little 60 foot hop-and-stop releases and leaves them 15 feet coming back. 

IMHO most average golfers would be better off not trying to spin the heck out of the ball and simply learn how far the ball is going to release and run under various conditions, with different clubs.  Is a high-spinning shot useful?  Absolutely.  But the skill that it takes to play it consistently is high enough that the risk in playing it very often will out-weigh the benefit most of the time.  Lowest score wins, not necessarily the sexiest looking shot.  a2_wink.gif    It's also worth adding that spin, especially consistent spin, is much more a function of proper technique, than of the brand wedge that someone plays.
I wasn't talking about those backwards spinning shots, but I agree with you that Too many people are attracted to them for some reason.

I was really thinking that most people I see pitch the ball and it runs runs past the hole (and sometimes through the green), so I thought they could use more spin, but you're right it's more about technique than anything else.

I'm definitely not advocating a low trajectory, high spinning shot as an optimal shot, nor am I using that particular shot as the basis for why I think people need more spin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

I too disagree.

Most people could do with more consistent spin rates, even if they're lower.

The average 10 handicapper is often surprised the few times he gets a ball to spin… and comes up 25 feet short. :P
Fair enough. Consistency is definitely a good thing.

I get what you're saying, but why the big deal with box grooves then?
post #32 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by David in FL View Post
 

 

I don't necessarily agree. 

 

A lot of mid-to-high hcp players see better players, and especially the pros spinning the heck out of wedge shots and think that more spin must be a good thing.  What they fail to realize is that spin can be a very tough thing to control, and adds another variable to your shot.  Even pros over-juice one on occasion, or the little 60 foot hop-and-stop releases and leaves them 15 feet coming back. 

 

IMHO most average golfers would be better off not trying to spin the heck out of the ball and simply learn how far the ball is going to release and run under various conditions, with different clubs.  Is a high-spinning shot useful?  Absolutely.  But the skill that it takes to play it consistently is high enough that the risk in playing it very often will out-weigh the benefit most of the time.  Lowest score wins, not necessarily the sexiest looking shot.  ;-)   It's also worth adding that spin, especially consistent spin, is much more a function of proper technique, than of the brand wedge that someone plays.


Exactly and spin usually isn't necessary on the run of the mill courses most amateurs play, soft greens and easy hole placements. My ball is often just inches from the ball mark and typically the mark is pretty deep, and that's for the measly 6-8 greens I hit during a round. Around the greens it's rarely necessary to do anything but roll it up to the hole. The golfers I play with that get up and down with any consistency keep the ball on the ground as often as possible.

post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post


I was really thinking that most people I see pitch the ball and it runs runs past the hole (and sometimes through the green), so I thought they could use more spin, but you're right it's more about technique than anything else.
 

If the guy hits a pitch shot that runs past the hole and off the green he likely hit it thin or on the club edge which means trying to spin the ball wouldn't have helped anyway

post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

http://sinclairgolf.com/research/83-which-wedge-spins-the-most

 

The scientific research is ongoing, and the more credible and larger number of studies seem to point towards face texture having little to nothing to do with spin.

Thanks for the link. 

I am a bit perturbed at the centre of gravity locations on some of the wedges. Seems to me some of them get to close to the hosel, I wonder how it affects ball flight and spin if one hits the centre of the club or towards the toe on these wedges with their COG so close to the heel.

Hmmm, I would like my COG to be in the centre of the club face thank you!

 

Care to comment iacas?

post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post

I get what you're saying, but why the big deal with box grooves then?

 

They helped pros and good players. They didn't do squat for 95% of amateurs.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by MitsuEd View Post
 

Thanks for the link. 

I am a bit perturbed at the centre of gravity locations on some of the wedges. Seems to me some of them get to close to the hosel, I wonder how it affects ball flight and spin if one hits the centre of the club or towards the toe on these wedges with their COG so close to the heel.

Hmmm, I would like my COG to be in the centre of the club face thank you!

 

Care to comment iacas?

 

Sure, but on what?

 

I have Edel wedges. COG is in the center.

 

I spun the reverse threaded Edels when I was being fit by David because I'd trained myself to hit the ball in the heel a little… where the CG on most wedges sits.

post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by newtogolf View Post

If the guy hits a pitch shot that runs past the hole and off the green he likely hit it thin or on the club edge which means trying to spin the ball wouldn't have helped anyway
Not about trying to spin the ball, simply stating that more spin on all their pitches would be beneficial. Just my position through casual observation, which is appearing to be flawed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

They helped pros and good players. They didn't do squat for 95% of amateurs.
So "high spinning" is just another marketing buzz word? Figures.

I buy my wedges based on grind and bounce options, anyway b2_tongue.gif
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