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Coffee or Tea - Page 2

post #19 of 46

Re: Coffee or Tea

Milk for me. It does a body good.

"Coffee, tea, or milk"

And how can one argue with Milk's sexy-cool ad campaign?
post #20 of 46

Re: Coffee or Tea

i used to drink 6 cups of coffee a day too but had to cut down as my hands started to become a little shaky from all the caffeine
post #21 of 46

Re: Coffee or Tea

...coffee...

Waaay toooo much.

I should drink more tea (they say it helps keep the nasty kidney stones away), but I love the coffee.

It's worse out here in Hawaii, where I have easy access to 100% Kona coffee.



-------------------------------

(avatar courtesy of: http://www.cafepress.com/naturesgym)
post #22 of 46

Re: Coffee or Tea

I like strong coffee with a lot of cream but only have it about once a week. Even if I have a cup in the morning, I find that I'm still amped up late in the afternoon.

I find tea relaxing and will often have a cup before a round in the spring or fall.
post #23 of 46

Re: Coffee or Tea

I only drink water or sometimes a sport drink during the round of golf, never drank coffee or tea on the golf course.
post #24 of 46
Coffee.. Hazelnut Regular from DD..

I don think that this coffee can be matched in my opinion.. I also love some earl gray tea everyonce in a while..

I am currently drinking too much Turkish coffee as that is the drink of choice for the Arabs in the Arab world, but you would be surprised at all the different stores here in Riyadh. DD, Starbucks, crispy cream, and others I don't care to remember.

The thing that keeps me away from most of these places is that there is no consistency like there is in the states.. If I go to store A it will be different than store B every time and here I am thinking that these chains actually held their names to standards.. Ehh.

That's my rant for the day
post #25 of 46

I just got a job roasting coffee for Fairway Market, which is not only a spectacular golf tie in, but is also opening right near my house next month so I'm training in Nassau county. We have Jamaican blue mountain, Kona estate, etc. The high end stuff is about 50$/lb but everything else is pretty cheap considering it's top quality and it's sold 30 feet from the roaster with a selection of at least 50 kinds. NY metro area only, though. Only Fairway among specialty markets roasts and blends their coffee in house. Starbucks and other chains do it in huge batches and get it to you weeks after roasting at best.

 

I wish I knew a good place to try turkish, I like just about every form of brewing but no mainstream places sell it and I don't really know how to make it properly.

 

They have a very good selection of teas as well and I appreciate them a lot, but I'm more of a coffee guy in the end. You can't use a cup of tea to wake up and drive on LI's main roads.

 

Also, the stores tend to open next to golf shops a lot, the one at which I'm training is next to a PGA tour superstore and the new one is opening next to a Golfsmith.

 


 

Just as a public service announcement, the number one reason people make terrible coffee at home is that they either don't use enough coffee per serving or they try to reinvent the process to make it quicker or something. It's easy to blame the bean and its freshness, or the machine, but it's perfectly possible to make liquid dirt from freshly roasted 100% Kona.

 

If you want delicious coffee, either get a pour over drip or french press. 20$ investment at the most, works perfectly. You only need to pay slight attention to it during brewing, and the flavor and price destroy K cups and single serve machines. Ditto for teabags; the convenience costs a lot of money and loose leaf teas are much better if you're willing to spend 2 minutes a day.

 

Grind at home if you can afford a decent grinder, and use about 2tbsp per 6oz of water, no less. You can use more for a strong cup, but using less will overextract the coffee and result in an unnecessarily bitter cup, especially darker beans. If you like it weaker, use the full ratio of grounds to water and add hot water to dilute afterwards if necessary.

 

The above is a typical pour over dripper. Place it on the cup you want to drink from, put a paper filter in, add the ground coffee (Paper filters all use about the same grind) and pour water close to the boiling point over the top. I like to use an electric kettle, you just add water just off the boil a few times to saturate the grounds and let it settle, don't fill it above the level of the grounds as you don't want standing water. After a couple minutes at the most, you'll have a sufficient level of delicious nectar and you simply dispose of the filter and rinse the dripper. They come in ceramic and plastic; I use plastic because it tends not to break and doesn't need to be warmed up with a bit of hot water.

The french press is a very simple machine, and I prefer it. You add the grounds (usually the coarsest setting available), add the water and stir. Let it steep for 3-4 minutes, not much more. Leave the top on but don't let it touch the coffee yet, this holds the temperature a bit better than the open top. Then  plunge the screen slowly to the bottom and pour the liquid ambrosia into a cup, then make sure you empty it and keep it clean. If it starts to get dirty, use boiling water and baking soda to clean the parts and remove odors, making sure to rinse extremely thoroughly.

 

This method produces a fuller body and a beautiful texture because it doesn't strip away all the oils like paper does. However, it can result in a tiny bit of sediment in the cup if the grind isn't perfect, so if that completely turns you off stick with drip. This is better for tastings and making a rich cup by far though.

post #26 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuciusWooding View Post
 

If you want delicious coffee, either get a pour over drip or french press. 20$ investment at the most, works perfectly. You only need to pay slight attention to it during brewing, and the flavor and price destroy K cups and single serve machines. Ditto for teabags; the convenience costs a lot of money and loose leaf teas are much better if you're willing to spend 2 minutes a day.

 

Grind at home if you can afford a decent grinder, and use about 2tbsp per 6oz of water, no less. You can use more for a strong cup, but using less will overextract the coffee and result in an unnecessarily bitter cup, especially darker beans. If you like it weaker, use the full ratio of grounds to water and add hot water to dilute afterwards if necessary.

 

Here's what my wife now swears by:

 

http://aerobie.com/products/aeropress.htm

 

http://smile.amazon.com/Aeropress-Coffee-and-Espresso-Maker/dp/B0047BIWSK/

http://smile.amazon.com/Hario-Coffee-Mill-Slim-Grinder/dp/B001804CLY/

http://smile.amazon.com/Filter-AeroPress-Ultra-Stainless-Coffee/dp/B00A1GVVMY/

 

Seriously amazing stuff. I'm not a coffee guy but it is fast, easy, and fresh. Great tasting - best coffee she's ever had she says.

post #27 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post
 

 

Here's what my wife now swears by:

 

http://aerobie.com/products/aeropress.htm

 

http://smile.amazon.com/Aeropress-Coffee-and-Espresso-Maker/dp/B0047BIWSK/

http://smile.amazon.com/Hario-Coffee-Mill-Slim-Grinder/dp/B001804CLY/

http://smile.amazon.com/Filter-AeroPress-Ultra-Stainless-Coffee/dp/B00A1GVVMY/

 

Seriously amazing stuff. I'm not a coffee guy but it is fast, easy, and fresh. Great tasting - best coffee she's ever had she says.

I haven't used that particular one, but I've heard good things generally. I like that it uses a little pressure, true espresso is made by a fine grind tamped into the filter and hot water is forced through at about 9 bars; this causes the extraction to be pretty short, picking up the caffeine and the sweeter, high end of the flavors without giving the water enough time to get to the more bitter compounds. The same thing with tea; we don't steep for more than 5 minutes because it only extracts tannins after that point. If you want to know what tannins taste like, peel 30 red grapes, eat the peels, and then pick up a few fallen oak leaves and chew on those for a while. They're not as prevalent in coffee, but other flavor compounds cause similar harsh flavors, requiring a lot more milk and sugar. Might not be a full flavor profile, but espresso doesn't really have that either and I still love it for what it is.

 

I also forgot to mention: I suggest most people buy less coffee at a time, since it obviously doesn't get better over time. Stick with what your household can drink within 1 week for the most part, any longer than that and it's best to keep it sealed in the freezer (not the fridge). The paper bag is an effective method of storage as long as you get the air out, since it blocks light effectively. Keep it cool and dry as well and it should last longer.

post #28 of 46
Great write ups thanks..

Like any other coffee the Turkish is really dependent on the beans..

It is much different than an espresso in that it is much thicker.. As far as I know there is no machine that will make it, so it is always a manual shot of caffeine (I mean coffee)

It's usually served in a small shot looking glass, I'll post a picture later..

To make it is real simple.

Get the right beans and grind them to an extreme softness, usually you can have them give you dark, medium or light and I usually go with the medium. Usually people will bring a few kilos with them as gifts to their family and friends in the states from the Middle East. I can send you some the next time I come to the states since your only in NY and I'm going to Mass..

Then it's simply boiling the water with as much sugar as you like 2 or 3 spoons, and finally mixing in 2 to 3 large spoons of coffee and letting it boil just a little bit more while mixing.

Finally it is removed from the heat and usually they let it sit for about 3 minutes or so that thy give time for all the grind to fall to the bottom, and then pour and serve..

No one ever finishes the cup, usually it is just a few sips and the rest is usually grime at the bottom..

That's it!!
post #29 of 46
Thanks for sharing, @LuciusWooding. Very informative.

I used to use a French press myself, but have become lazy over the years. For a while, I stopped drinking coffee altogether. I'm the same way with tea; I have some premium Taiwan oolong sitting in my China cabinet, but I'm lazy, so I drink bag teas.

Espresso machines are fascinating instruments. From what I understand, the higher quality machines can change the flavor profile of the coffee simply by adjusting the settings, even though the beans are the same.
post #30 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post
From what I understand, the higher quality machines can change the flavor profile of the coffee simply by adjusting the settings, even though the beans are the same.

Some of the most expensive machines have grinders built in, and the grind has a HUGE influence with espresso. I'd go back and spend the same amount on the machine as the grinder rather than 7 times more on the machine because there simply aren't enough settings on my grinder to get a really good shot. Personally I prefer a semi automatic, which just pulls the shot and lets you steam milk but requires you to grind and dose the beans. Costs a lot less and is much more fun to use. I basically have a prosumer kind of machine so most people wouldn't need as big a budget.

 

There are a few other variables like temperature and pressure, but generally one leaves those alone. The dose and tamp, exactly how much coffee is used and how it's packed down, are also important. Generally the more control you have the more dialed in you can get, but this helps more if you pull 200 consistent shots in a day rather than 2-4. They are usually extremely well engineered machines once you get out of the entry level price range. There are also ways you can trick the machine's thermostat and get the boiler up to steaming temperature quickly, for example.

 

@Abu3baid That's pretty cool, I'll probably grind a little bit next time I'm at work, the grinders there can produce a very fine consistency almost like flour. It'd be cool to learn a little bit about this method since it's so rare in the states, and it's definitely a unique experience. I'd prefer to have the proper pot and a gas stove, but it can't hurt to test out a couple batches. 

post #31 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abu3baid View Post

Coffee.. Hazelnut Regular from DD..

I don think that this coffee can be matched in my opinion.. I also love some earl gray tea everyonce in a while..

I am currently drinking too much Turkish coffee as that is the drink of choice for the Arabs in the Arab world, but you would be surprised at all the different stores here in Riyadh. DD, Starbucks, crispy cream, and others I don't care to remember.

The thing that keeps me away from most of these places is that there is no consistency like there is in the states.. If I go to store A it will be different than store B every time and here I am thinking that these chains actually held their names to standards.. Ehh.

That's my rant for the day

 

Not just Arabs, a lot of Chinese and Taiwanese like it as well. The only thing is the grinds on the bottom make it slower to pour, so many people drink French Dripped or Espresso. Vietnamese have a french drip coffee too with sweetened condensed milk.

 

Do you put condensed milk (sweetened) in it? That's very popular in Asia.

post #32 of 46

Coffee, 3 cups, 5 hour energy right before the round, and a monster energy drink on the front. I don't even bother lining up putts that much because I am shaking too much to hold the line. 

post #33 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by whatwoodtigerdo View Post
 

Coffee, 3 cups, 5 hour energy right before the round, and a monster energy drink on the front. I don't even bother lining up putts that much because I am shaking too much to hold the line. 


This actually happened to me as well, two Venti drinks from Starbucks. 48 putts. :-$

post #34 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuciusWooding View Post
 

Some of the most expensive machines have grinders built in, and the grind has a HUGE influence with espresso. I'd go back and spend the same amount on the machine as the grinder rather than 7 times more on the machine because there simply aren't enough settings on my grinder to get a really good shot. Personally I prefer a semi automatic, which just pulls the shot and lets you steam milk but requires you to grind and dose the beans. Costs a lot less and is much more fun to use. I basically have a prosumer kind of machine so most people wouldn't need as big a budget.

 

There are a few other variables like temperature and pressure, but generally one leaves those alone. The dose and tamp, exactly how much coffee is used and how it's packed down, are also important. Generally the more control you have the more dialed in you can get, but this helps more if you pull 200 consistent shots in a day rather than 2-4.

I worked in an upscale restaurant years ago where I had to learn to use their machine. IIRC, it was basically grind, dose, tamp, repeat. Then you put it in the machine and ran it. Despite the fact that I was a pretty good bartender, I could never quite get the hang of making coffees.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post
 

 

Not just Arabs, a lot of Chinese and Taiwanese like it as well. The only thing is the grinds on the bottom make it slower to pour, so many people drink French Dripped or Espresso. Vietnamese have a french drip coffee too with sweetened condensed milk.

 

Do you put condensed milk (sweetened) in it? That's very popular in Asia.

Vietnamese coffee is my favorite coffee. I get it on ice whenever I go out for pho. It's funny, with places like Starbucks and all their roast/condiment combinations, they just can't match the intensity and complexity of Turkish coffee and sweetened condensed milk.

 

I think my love of Turkish coffee is the reason I tend to dislike American coffee. In Taiwan, all the coffee shops have an item called "American coffee" on their menus. I asked my uncle what it was, and he told me it's just a weaker version of regular coffee.

post #35 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by iacas View Post

Here's what my wife now swears by:

http://aerobie.com/products/aeropress.htm

http://smile.amazon.com/Aeropress-Coffee-and-Espresso-Maker/dp/B0047BIWSK/
http://smile.amazon.com/Hario-Coffee-Mill-Slim-Grinder/dp/B001804CLY/
http://smile.amazon.com/Filter-AeroPress-Ultra-Stainless-Coffee/dp/B00A1GVVMY/

Seriously amazing stuff. I'm not a coffee guy but it is fast, easy, and fresh. Great tasting - best coffee she's ever had she says.

I'm not a coffee drinker, but I'd been planning to get my dad one of those for father's day just because I like cool innovations.
post #36 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by LuciusWooding View Post

Some of the most expensive machines have grinders built in, and the grind has a HUGE influence with espresso. I'd go back and spend the same amount on the machine as the grinder rather than 7 times more on the machine because there simply aren't enough settings on my grinder to get a really good shot. Personally I prefer a semi automatic, which just pulls the shot and lets you steam milk but requires you to grind and dose the beans. Costs a lot less and is much more fun to use. I basically have a prosumer kind of machine so most people wouldn't need as big a budget.

There are a few other variables like temperature and pressure, but generally one leaves those alone. The dose and tamp, exactly how much coffee is used and how it's packed down, are also important. Generally the more control you have the more dialed in you can get, but this helps more if you pull 200 consistent shots in a day rather than 2-4. They are usually extremely well engineered machines once you get out of the entry level price range. There are also ways you can trick the machine's thermostat and get the boiler up to steaming temperature quickly, for example.

@Abu3baid
 That's pretty cool, I'll probably grind a little bit next time I'm at work, the grinders there can produce a very fine consistency almost like flour. It'd be cool to learn a little bit about this method since it's so rare in the states, and it's definitely a unique experience. I'd prefer to have the proper pot and a gas stove, but it can't hurt to test out a couple batches. 

Ah yes, I didn't mention the pot but you can get this pot from any Arabic specialty store, there are probably a ton of them in NYC. Let us know how your experimentation works out please!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lihu View Post

Not just Arabs, a lot of Chinese and Taiwanese like it as well. The only thing is the grinds on the bottom make it slower to pour, so many people drink French Dripped or Espresso. Vietnamese have a french drip coffee too with sweetened condensed milk.

Do you put condensed milk (sweetened) in it? That's very popular in Asia.

I did not know that Turkish coffee had any sort of market share china or Taiwan.. That's pretty cool, I would love to have a cup to really compare the row and see how similar they are..

I have never heared of putting milk with it.. ? I'm going to have to ask about this, and see if there someone around here that can serve me a cup.. Or if you know how it is made please share so that I can ask my wife to help me out..
Quote:
Originally Posted by billchao View Post

I worked in an upscale restaurant years ago where I had to learn to use their machine. IIRC, it was basically grind, dose, tamp, repeat. Then you put it in the machine and ran it. Despite the fact that I was a pretty good bartender, I could never quite get the hang of making coffees.

Vietnamese coffee is my favorite coffee. I get it on ice whenever I go out for pho. It's funny, with places like Starbucks and all their roast/condiment combinations, they just can't match the intensity and complexity of Turkish coffee and sweetened condensed milk.

I think my love of Turkish coffee is the reason I tend to dislike American coffee. In Taiwan, all the coffee shops have an item called "American coffee" on their menus. I asked my uncle what it was, and he told me it's just a weaker version of regular coffee.

They have American coffee here in KSA as well.. Unfortunately it is not the same as the filtered coffee we both think of.. Basically they make an espresso shot pour it in a cup and then fill it with water.. I hate it... Wonder if that is the same your uncle is talking about..
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