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Irons for an improving high handicapper

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I'm planning on speding some time with this crazy game and wondered if you folks would have any suggestions regarding the kind of iron that would benefit me now as a high handicapper but would still be worth keeping as my scores decrease and I hopefully become a mid-handicapper. Should I be looking at a forged game improvement iron such as Mizuno's MX-33 or something else?

Should I take the game in phases by sticking with my current bargain set until I can appreciate and play a better iron set later?

I would find any ideas helpful and interesting.
post #2 of 8
IMHO, I think a lot of it depends on where you're at right now. If you can hit the ball straight, consistantly make solid contact, are comfortable with long irons, and have been able to translate driving range performance to the course, I'd say you're ready for a high quality iron you can grow with. If not, I'd say spend the money on some lessons from a reputable PGA pro, balls at the driving range, and practice rounds at the local course.

Of course if you have spare $$ to burn, why not spend it on a nice set of irons. They'll last a long time and as an added bonus if you go forged, I doubt there will be any revolutionary advances in technology such as in drivers.

For a high handicapper looking to lower their scores, I'd suggest a forged cavity back or one of the newer forged muscle/cavity back combo sets. Models to check out include Titleist 690 CB, Nike Forged Pro Combo, Mizuno MX-30, Ben Hogan Apex FXT Forged Combo. In a cast blade style cavity back with a nice thin topline look at PING S59.

For me, moving to forged blades really helped me improve my ball striking simply because there's no two ways hit them. You either do it correctly or pay a pretty severe penalty in accuracy and distance.

Forged cavity backs would be a nice way to go since they provide some forgiveness but still give you good feedback on off center hits. As you get better they will definatley allow you to learn how to work the ball since most of them are identical to muscle back models with different weighting.

I really like the idea of the new forged combo sets with muscle backs in PW-7I, and cavity backs in 6I-3I. Even most higher handicapers should be able to accurately hit muscle backs in the lower irons since their high lofts reduce side spin. Having forged cavity backs in the longer irons allows for some forgiveness and the lower center of gravity helps in getting the ball nice and high in the air.

Whatever you decide don't rush into it or get pressured into a deal. Hit a lot of different models and see which one suits your game best. Also find a place willing to fit you, it's vital to your progressing in the sport.

Just my $.02 hope it helps.
post #3 of 8
As a self proposed Taylor Made fan, I surprised you didn't mention the TM RACs? A coworker at the course here is sponsored by TM and she not only uses them, but highly recommends them. Especially for "improving high handicappers."
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Originally Posted by Ben
As a self proposed Taylor Made fan, I surprised you didn't mention the TM RACs? A coworker at the course here is sponsored by TM and she not only uses them, but highly recommends them. Especially for "improving high handicappers."
Are you talking about any TM iron in particular like the RAC LT or the RAC CGB? The LT promotes a lower ball flight which could be bad for the "high-handicap" part of my game . They might grow with me though.
post #5 of 8
Beats me man, I didn't know they were two sets. I just know the RACs are what this girl pushes. Since you've done the research about ball flight and what not, I'll say, yeah, the CGBs !

Can't go wrong with a nice set of Ping Eye 2s either. Things are timeless. Amateurs and pros alike use them with great success to this day.
post #6 of 8
I'm not a huge fan of TM irons. They only have one forged model, and that's a cavity back. I really didn't like the feel of them compared to Titleist and Mizuno especially since they're all at the same price point. Irons (like all golf equipment) are such a personal choice I don't think any manufacturer should be ruled out until demoed.

I am a big fan of TM drivers (which is my favorite club in my bag), but I don't like the way they're constantly adding new clubs daily (R five-hundred series ---> R7 ----> R5 ---> R7HT). Every month the company seems to introduce a new one, and to play with the models the pros use you have to pay big $$$$. I wish they were more like titleist who introduces the same basic product as the pros get and sticks with it for a while.
post #7 of 8
Originally Posted by TaylorMadeFan
Every month the company seems to introduce a new one, and to play with the models the pros use you have to pay big $$$$. I wish they were more like titleist who introduces the same basic product as the pros get and sticks with it for a while.
I hear that. Working in the industry I've come to learn that that's TM's business plan. Pump out new equipment each period every year and let the customer keep up. It's the reason why I won't play TM stuff anymore. (Used to have a Bubble Burner, and those cooky ICW irons) By the time I'm willing to pay for their stuff, and new model is already out.
post #8 of 8
I don't know your swing or your handicap, but you have three options. You can go straight forgiving cavity back, slightly harder to hit cavity back, or a more difficult club like the Mizuno MP 30's. Here is what I suggest. If you are only going to work on your game a little bit, like hit the range only a few times a month, go with the Mizuno MX 23's. They'll give you enough forgiveness to keep the game fun.

However, if you are willing to practice, I highly recommend the clubs TaylorMadeFan suggested. That is, Titleist 690 CB, Nike Forged Pro Combo, Mizuno MP 30, and the Ben Hogan Apex FXT Forged Combo. These are all very well made clubs, and very accurate. They are also lacking in the forgiveness department. At first you might have trouble. But, if you are willing to take some lessons, and dilligently practice those lessons, your scores will drop with these clubs. The reason for this is because these clubs will force you to groove a consistent, proper swing. They won't let you get away with a garbage swing like the RAC's will. No, go with something that will force you to get better.

If you have anymore specific questions pertaining to this subject or these club models, just let me know!
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