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Gap Wedge vs Approach Wedge - Page 2

post #19 of 25

Ping calls its gap wedge a "U" wedge!!!

 

I always hit my gap wedges with a full swing so I prefer the gap wedge that comes with the set, as opposed to a 50 degree Vokey or Cleveland wedge.

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post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyD69 View Post

Nope....... Just semantics, one manufacturer got one name, another manufacturer got the other. They are basically the wedge that fits between your pitching wedge (which is really a 10 iron - because it is designed like the rest of the clubs in your set) and your "standard" sand wedge. Lofts could be anywhere from 50 to 53 degrees (give or take a degree).

Speaking of semantics that same club is called a Gap Wedge, Approach Wedge and don't forget the Dual Wedge ( marked with a "D" on the sole.)

 

They are indeed essentially all  the same club with loft from 49 degrees up until you border on the "Sand wedge" which starts at approx. 54 degrees ...

 

Another thing that has made this issue more complicated besides the multiple names is the often great range of lofts using the same name. OEM's have strengthened most lofts in virtually all iron sets in recent years in order to market them as "longer" than the previous 7 iron etc.  For Example, Many of todays 7 irons are yesterdays 6 irons - no wonder we hit that new 7 iron so much longer!!  LOL

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by powertrip240 View Post

While we're on the subject of gap wedges, my set of Cleveland TA4's has a 52 degree wedge labeled "D" wedge. Anyone know what the "D" stands for?
Cleveland did stamp "Diadic" on the 53° Gunmetal wedge. I have this wedge as my "gap/ approach/ attack/ dual/ second/ wedge" and it is almost time to replace it. This is my go to wedge and since they don't make the 588 Gunmetal anymore, I'm not sure where I'm going to go, that goes for my SW & LW too. Suggestions?? Anyone??


The "D" can also represent "Dual" as in dual purpose or as Cleveland web site indicates part of a pair. {Dyadic}
http://www.clevelandgolf.com/wedgeleadership/lightBoxContent/tech/diadic.html

Maybe it could stand for *Dude* wedge especially if you hit it well as in, "Dude, sweet shot!" Right after you stick it within 3 ft. from 65 yds. :)
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by stogiesnbogies View Post

Speaking of semantics that same club is called a Gap Wedge, Approach Wedge and don't forget the Dual Wedge ( marked with a "D" on the sole.)

They are indeed essentially all  the same club with loft from 49 degrees up until you border on the "Sand wedge" which starts at approx. 54 degrees ...

Another thing that has made this issue more complicated besides the multiple names is the often great range of lofts using the same name. OEM's have strengthened most lofts in virtually all iron sets in recent years in order to market them as "longer" than the previous 7 iron etc.  For Example, Many of todays 7 irons are yesterdays 6 irons - no wonder we hit that new 7 iron so much longer!!  LOL
Great article on Loft & Distance Tables regarding "loft creep" here:
http://www.leaderboard.com/LOFTINFO.htm
post #23 of 25

I read the article on loft creep. Good points, except it missed key event.

 

First loft creep was a move by early Ping designers to preserve distance, not gain it.

 

The original Ping iron designs with perimeter weighting produced a clubhead that got the ball up quicker and higher than standard muscleback designs. But, with the higher launch, Ping found that their 7i didn't go quite as far as a well-hit muscleback 7i. So, Ping strengthened the lofts a couple of degrees to protect distance.

 

Golfdom's marketing guys heard about this, and decided, let's do this too and say our 7i goes 155 yards instead of 150. Then, the loft-creep arms race was on.

post #24 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by WUTiger View Post

I read the article on loft creep. Good points, except it missed key event.

First loft creep was a move by early Ping designers to preserve distance, not gain it.

The original Ping iron designs with perimeter weighting produced a clubhead that got the ball up quicker and higher than standard muscleback designs. But, with the higher launch, Ping found that their 7i didn't go quite as far as a well-hit muscleback 7i. So, Ping strengthened the lofts a couple of degrees to protect distance.

Golfdom's marketing guys heard about this, and decided, let's do this too and say our 7i goes 155 yards instead of 150. Then, the loft-creep arms race was on.
Yep. Solid points and now I guess it really doesn't matter so much because we all (most all of us ) know about it. Besides most of us build our own set to fit our game/style of golf, or as in the case with many manufacturers now a "full set" includes one or two long hybrids (3,4) and 5-Gap or Sand.
The club game has certainly changed from traditional 2-PW/1,3,4,5 woods.
My set: Dr., 4W, 4H, 5-PW, GW, SW, LW, putter (13 clubs is all I need!)
post #25 of 25

Gap wedge is the old Pitching wedge. Check out the loft creep phenomenon.

http://www.leaderboard.com/LOFTINFO.htm

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