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All the right words, in all the right places?

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Wow, maybe more and more people are using video

No one at the ranges I go to make use of video, and if they do, they're doing it wrong, I'm one of the rare few who brings a tripod. Looking at the Facebook page of a popular instructor today, and it's the dead of winter, there are tons of people jury rigging whatever they have to practice indoors - school gyms, basements, backyards - from all over the place, US, UK, Canada. They're all using video, some high frame rate, although their angles could be better. So maybe I'm just in an unrepresentative area but it seems from this little keyhole I'm looking through people are more and more comfortable using video. Watching all these people working at their game is inspiring.

nevets88

nevets88

 

Whenever I see these modified grapes, I buy them

There are the ones that look like chili peppers and the ones that taste like cotton candy are my favorite. These were at Trader Joe's yesterday: They're ok, cotton candy grapes still my favorite. Sugar Crunch has like a "dry" taste to it, it's a little different from your standard variety green grape, sweeter and harder obviously. I'd still buy it again, because you don't see these everyday, but always on the lookout for cotton candy grapes.

nevets88

nevets88

 

What watching a regular tour event would be like with none of the cruft

Due to account restrictions, could only upload a 6 minute video, had much longer coverage in the original, which proves my point better but here is a regular tour event, the recent Honda Classic, with all action, no commercials, no blimp, no CEOs, no reporters. Isn't this just a better watch? Of course you can't eliminate ads, but there are ways to make improve the quality of current broadcasts as a recent blog post by @nolayingup outlined. There's probably more golf action in this 6 minutes than in 40 minutes of a typical broadcast. Apologies in advance for the shoddy video editing.     

nevets88

nevets88

 

TV is not a frontal lobotomy, golf edition

Recently, there's been a lot of "golf" you can watch on tv not Golf Channel, not anything coming from a multinational conglomerate, but by way of individuals and social circles.  There's the 3 things video that @iacas posted here, which was excellent. In addition, the 5SK videos that were included with the subscription was an excellent overview of 5SK, plus there were a couple of videos from Dana Dahlquist and a ton from Chuck Evans.  Here's an overview of the video goodies that you might have seen in your social media feed: A limited number of the Top 100 Summit talks were available via Periscope (it only keeps videos for 24 hours, so not there anymore), Mark Broadie's was the best (if you want a copy, PM me), he really did a good job of encapsulating his book into an hour talk and it seems like he integrated some LSW like concepts into his presentation w/respect to decision mapping. Sasho MacKenzie's went way over my head, I'll have to revisit it. The Open Forum 3 videos, which include 2 live lessons (Brian Manzella and Rob Houlding), 3 biomechanics lectures, a golf stats panel, skills acquisition panel and dog & pony shows from Trackman, K-Vest and Gears Golf. The most interesting parts were the Q&A portions of the panels, golf instructors were probably a majority of attendees, so the questions were practical. The last bit of Dr. Cheetham's talk about twist velocities where an instructor outlined his practical takeaways from Cheetham's dissertation was fun - he put up photos of two golfers and asked the audience who they thought had the higher twist velocity and the results were not what you'd expect. The skills acquisition panel gave some insight into practicing (internal vs external, block practicing) and TPI. @david_wedzik and @iacas were on the stats panel, but the Q&A portion, the questions weren't that interesting, actually, that was the shortest video. The live lessons were what you'd expect. If you follow ggswingtips, George Gankas, you know that many of his juniors have crazy good swings so couldn't resist and signed up for the early bird deal for his new online video lessons site. So far, his videos on the full swing are very good, there's lots of great insights into many different aspects of the swing, especially what he said about the grip, shallowing and rotation. The site is more focused towards juniors and he also posted actual lessons with juniors. Available soon will be videos in which Martin Chuck, Dana Dahlquist, Andrew Rice and Trackman Maestro present and also give lessons, but it's pricey and we'll have to see whether that's worth it or not. There was a Periscope of them giving a lesson to the same guy, but the video was very short and low quality.  And those are the ones I know of, bet there are some I missed. I'm not sure if I'm information overloading myself with all this content but it's certainly been interesting seeing more of what's out there, hearing different points of views, and getting more informed.

nevets88

nevets88

 

Thoughts about backswing shortening

Is making a shorter backswing harder than a longer one? When coming back from not playing for awhile, the first noticeable thing on video is my backswing is longer. Both the big muscles and the small. Shoulders turn more and wrists hinge even more so. It seems like if you look at swings at your typical driving range, you have more swings going past parallel than not. PGA Tour and good amateurs less so these days because the "modern" swing you don't see the shaft go past parallel as much w/exception of driver, longer clubs. You'd think it'd be easier making a shorter backswing than a longer one, fewer moving parts but I think it's easier to make a longer one because a longer swing gives you more "time" to make a swing. Plus it feels more powerful because you're taking more of a windup.  A shorter backswing, I intellectually know its advantages, easier to shallow, less opportunity for things to go wrong, simpler, but human instinct seems to take precedence over what you're brain "knows" is "right". A shorter backswing is uncomfortable because you have less time to make the swing, it feels rushed if you're used to a longer backswing. Like you're trying to compress the pieces you want to implement in 1/2 the time. You hear so many times during a lesson that the shorter swing felt like a 1/2 swing or even 1/4 one. I guess you could write this same piece saying the exact opposite, but if I had to guess, more people, 60/40, maybe more, would say shorter is harder, especially as the club gets longer.

nevets88

nevets88

 

This is me reading reddit's golf subreddit

There are so many old school cliches there in a space that usually trends young, it's a non sequitur. I don't claim to have it all right, but I've been around a lot longer than some of the young'uns and have made many, many mistakes and I hope to prevent these guys from doing the same. So downvote me, I don't care, just stop banging your head on the wall and get better faster. Getting off my soapbox.   

nevets88

nevets88

 

The New Tappan Zee Bridge

Not crazy about how it was named the Mario Cuomo Bridge (passed in wee hours in secret by his son), but official opening is tomorrow, in my mind, it'll be the new Tappan Zee Bridge. Maybe the Nyack - Tarrytown bridge?   http://www.newnybridge.com/ready-and-waiting-new-bridge-prepared-for-friday-nights-traffic-shift/    

nevets88

nevets88

 

The Cable Stayed Bridge

The cabled stayed bridge. When done right, it can really transform a skyline and especially look dramatic at night. Under certain conditions, it costs less to build and maintain than a suspension bridge, something to do with maximum road segment length. But it seems many of these projects are plagued with cost overruns. Rusted supports, salt water eating away. If they're supposed to save money, you wouldn't be able to tell based on news headlines. See eastern segment of the Bay Bridge. If you travel around the world and return home only to see none, you wonder where are my taxes going? Why isn't the infrastructure being updated? Of course it makes no sense to tear down an old bridge and put up a new one just for the sake of it, but NYC, for example, has some pretty old, ugly looking bridges that must cost a pretty penny to maintain. The pigeon droppings alone costs a substantial amount to clean. The Williamsburg. The Manhattan. They just look... old. The first cable stayed bridge in the US was built in Washington in the late 70s. Tampa has a stunning one. Boston's was finished 13 years ago. The one in Delaware is over 20 years old. Oakland has a new bridge to rival the GG. There are about 30 in the US. There are at least 60 in China alone and there are some stunning ones around the world. One of the bridges below is Calatrava's, but his projects tend to go over budget. The NYC metro area is finally getting two. There are currently two in existence, but they're pedestrian bridges, at Rockefeller University and the Intrepid, that's it. You have the new Goethels and the Tappan Zee replacement, which 44 fast tracked because the TPZ was literally falling apart with holes and way over its 50 year shelf life and built to bear a lighter load than it does now. I guess that's not uncommon, we wait until the last minute or an accident to do something. Who knows how much the final tally will be, but at least it's a sign we're updating our infrastructure. The new TPZ (The New NY Bridge? Hope it gets a more original name) has a pedestrian roadway, you'll finally be able to cross the Hudson on foot or bike from Nyack to Tarrytown. For 4 billion, there better be one. http://www.johnweeks.com/cablestay/index.html   The C&D Cooper River Bridge On a totally unrelated note since we're speaking about infrastructure:

nevets88

nevets88

 

The Bicycle Thread

All things bicycle here. This guy installed a Loud Bicycle. It's basically a car horn on a bike. Folks, don't be surprised if you hear a car horn and a bike is behind you. He also vlogged his ride via his helmet cam. LOOK AT ALL THOSE BICYCLISTS! You can hear him use the Loud Bicycle at around 05:54. I wondered if the drivers even noticed in time.  

nevets88

nevets88

 

Staving Off Inevitability

I got reading glasses, well, progressive lenses, put it off as long as I possibly could, can make due with regular glasses, but easier at the computer and duh, reading, with these. Turning my head from left to right and right to left and everything is warping. I guess sooner or later, I'm gonna be the guy with the glasses in the straps hanging from my neck, and tilting my head down, looking at people when I talk. Sigh.   

nevets88

nevets88

 

Runner's view

Pretty soon, there are going to be tons of people running by, ~12 miles done, the first running sub 5 minute miles like they're nothing. 

nevets88

nevets88

 

Reddit rant

Commenting on a post of a before and after video, one redditor asked what was the difference. Apparently he/she saw none. This was the before and after top of backswing positions. And the guy got upvotes.   The place is ADD.

nevets88

nevets88

 

Range design for the future

It annoys me when you go to a range and you can't take face on video. It's one thing if the range is full and you can't place your camera because the stall in front of you is occupied. That's fine. It's when ranges build dividers that block an important part of the swing, impact, some build stalls that block nearly everything. It's twenty freaking seventeen, and video is available to the masses, hell, you could even say most people have high speed video available now. In H forking D. No, in 4 f**king K. Maybe even 8K. The wherewithal to use video is another thing, but imho, if you're building a range, you should consider alternative setups that allow customers to take face on video. Privacy at a public range is for nought, anyone who is curious enough can just stand behind you and gawk (get out of my view you nosey body). The grill dividers are ok, you can kind of see through them, I dunno, why have divders at all? You don't see them at a grass range. Dividerless, maybe people will be less inclined to do something stupid, like anything they come up with drunk or happy Gilmores. 

nevets88

nevets88

 

Practicing with video - tips that may hopefully help you

Some of this is obvious for experienced players, I'll list them anyway for the benefit of those starting out. Will add as I learn/discover more.   Duh, camera angles are very important. You probably know this already, but will mention it anyway. Always bring an alignment stick, which will make pointing your camera much easier. You may hit a cr@p shot, but video may redeem you by showing you you actually did what your instructor advised. That's a good thing, you're changing the picture. This should gave you encouragement, you'll eventually hit the ball more solid with the new piece. Everyone around you may be hitting more balls than you, it may seem video is slowing you down, but you're seeing what's actually happening versus guessing. By associating feel and real, you're actually making faster progress than those not using video. You don't have to be at a range to use video, practice your moves at home and video them. Even without a ball or club. Frequent shorter spurts of practice is much better than cramming. As per @billchao, work on one thing at a time. Usually there's a better angle for a specific piece. For shallowing, down the line, impact, face on. Review your swing in realtime, 30fps and high frame rate, 120/240+fps. You'll see different aspects of your swing.  Switch up the camera position often, don't stay with down the line or face on too long. You'll get caught up in one aspect of the swing perhaps to the detriment of another. There's also the posterior view. I'm pretty sure your range will frown upon you using a drone for overhead views. Review your swing on a big screen the night of or day after. You'll notice things you didn't see on the small screen. Use Analzyr (Mac) or Kinovea (PC). My preference is Analyzr as it's much simpler but feature rich. If your range has dividers that block the face on view, pull the mat back past the divider. If your stall is walled on both sides, you could try turning 45, 60 degrees to get a face on view, that's what I've been told, have yet to try this though, comment below if you got this to work (or not). If it's sunny and blistering hot, put a large towel over your head to review video, you'll look stupid, but you'll see the video better, save battery life and get respite from the sun. Get a tripod bag. Be prepared to say, no, I'm not going to hot yoga. It'll make life easier, trust me on this. When using an iPhone to record video, to save battery life, I turn off the GPS and turn on low power mode. When recording, I turn the screen brightness down - you're not watching the screen, so it doesn't matter. Yes, it's annoying you have to turn the screen brightness back up when viewing. Not sure how much this helps, but in theory it should save some battery consumption. Or you can painter's tape a portable power bank to your tripod and your phone will outlast you, no battery worries there. It shouldn't make manipulating the tripod any harder. I'd recommend a model that's at least 20,000mAh so you don't have to charge the bank as often.   You may forget one or two important things your instructor told you, no matter how many times you watched your lesson video, reviewed notes. When you're in the thick of practicing, not hard to do. Copy your lesson text and/or video to your phone so you can read/watch again when things get pear shaped. I use Evernote for text, Dropbox/OneDrive/Google Drive for video. Try and put all your lessons in the cloud so that they're easily accessible. It's the closest thing to having your pro with you without him/her physically/remotely being there You're going to have lots of video in storage and you'll probably delete them, don't delete them all, leave a couple of videos, preferably the last swings from the practice session, on your phone for quick reference. Learn how to clip videos to save space. A full swing, 240fps, on an iPhone, takes up about 15-30 megabytes, depending on how much ball flight you capture. Portrait mode is looked down on, but is better for down the line views, you don't have to set the camera as far back as landscape and you can see more of the ball flight if you hit it high. Heck, use portrait all the time, that's what all my instructors do, they know a thing or two.   To see if your shaft is pointing inside or outside the ball at A5 you can use a straight edge to superimpose over the display as opposed to a swing analysis app to draw lines, don't use a credit card or transit pass or anything important (duh), it's going to increase the chances of you losing it. Use a clubshaft as a straight edge, just superimpose it over your smartphone display. Or if you have a removable case, use that as a straight edge, or even the bottom of your hand made into a karate chop.   If you're hitting into the sun and you lose track of the ball and you're recording in high speed video from down the line, you'll be able to the start line and maybe some of the initial curvature depending on conditions. To see if you're hitting the ball fat, when videoing face on, if your mat is wet, you'll see the splash the water makes, it'll be especially obvious when you hit it fat. If it didn't rain, pour some water onto the mat. Same goes for when you make contact with the mat after hitting the ball.   To protect your smartphone while videoing yourself in the rain, trying using a rain cover provided with a bicycle smartphone mount. I use this from Morpheus Labs, it's a very snug fit, actually a bit of an effort to get on, but you can still use the touch screen, you'll have to press harder. The fingerprint scan won't work though and it'll widen your phone so your tripod mount will need to accommodate the extra width. If it protects the phone while cycling, which I found it does, pretty sure it's good enough for videoing your swing in the rain. You can use your bicycle smartphone mount as a portable kind of gorilla pod if there's something nearby to mount it to.   Zooming in is very handy. From down the line, I'll max out the zoom in and focus in on the ball, to see where on the club head the ball hits the face. You can see heel, toe, thin, fat better this way. Instead of using a heavy power bank, you could use a lipstick charger and a short cable, the lipstick is not heavy enough to pull the cable off your phone. Don't need tape, simpler.

nevets88

nevets88

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