Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
  • entries
    70
  • comments
    807
  • views
    22,231

The Bicycle Thread

Sign in to follow this  
nevets88

14,836 views

All things bicycle here.

This guy installed a Loud Bicycle. It's basically a car horn on a bike. Folks, don't be surprised if you hear a car horn and a bike is behind you. He also vlogged his ride via his helmet cam. LOOK AT ALL THOSE BICYCLISTS! You can hear him use the Loud Bicycle at around 05:54. I wondered if the drivers even noticed in time.

 

Sign in to follow this  


112 Comments


Recommended Comments



When I was working, I commuted daily 52 miles one way.   Not really practical to ride a bicycle.   I enjoy riding a bike but for my safety I'll stick to the trails or the paved paths.   I've known three people that were killed riding their bikes on the road, the message to me is clear.   

Share this comment


Link to comment
19 hours ago, billchao said:

NYC subways are falling apart because they're old and half the reason for the delays is because they're trying to upgrade stuff. NYC Metro isn't London, Hong Kong, Singapore, etc., but it isn't Los Angeles, Detroit, or Mumbai, either. But the grass is always greener somewhere, right?

There's also the trash problem, trash causes fires. MTA doubled fines. Not sure how much of that is to distract from infrastructure issues though.

 

 

Share this comment


Link to comment

I can't play golf right now due to my knee. Even practice swings are an issue. But for some reason I can ride and it doesn't hurt the meniscus tear. So I've been hitting the trails again and did a road ride yesterday. I felt very comfortable on the bike.

We talk a lot about muscle memory in golf, but the same applies to cycling. Other than fatigue, my pedal cadence is the same and the way I approach hills and obstacles on the trail hasn't changed. I don't even think about it much (stupid monkey I guess applies here too). 

When I learned to ride to race, I studied a lot about proper form, cadence and tactics. They became ingrained with good practice. The only 'ride thought' I would have would be to kick the knees toward the handle bars during the pedal stroke to smooth out the circle or watch your breathing rhythm. Everything else was on autopilot.

I want to get there in golf too. I'm not close to the number of hours training I had in cycling yet in golf. But I will continue to take the right approach.

Share this comment


Link to comment
On 9/25/2017 at 7:22 AM, boogielicious said:

I can't play golf right now due to my knee. Even practice swings are an issue. But for some reason I can ride and it doesn't hurt the meniscus tear. So I've been hitting the trails again and did a road ride yesterday. I felt very comfortable on the bike.

We talk a lot about muscle memory in golf, but the same applies to cycling. Other than fatigue, my pedal cadence is the same and the way I approach hills and obstacles on the trail hasn't changed. I don't even think about it much (stupid monkey I guess applies here too). 

When I learned to ride to race, I studied a lot about proper form, cadence and tactics. They became ingrained with good practice. The only 'ride thought' I would have would be to kick the knees toward the handle bars during the pedal stroke to smooth out the circle or watch your breathing rhythm. Everything else was on autopilot.

I want to get there in golf too. I'm not close to the number of hours training I had in cycling yet in golf. But I will continue to take the right approach.

Hope you get better quickly Scott.

I agree, I take for granted the skills I've accumulated from riding for so long, don't even think twice about riding in places most people would be petrified to ride in (as am reminded by family and friends who say nooooo to riding in the city, even in carless Central Park), the death avoidance, avoiding puncturing tires, riding straight between tight spots without touching anything, figuring out ways to sit on the bike without putting a foot down, taxi-ing another bicycle while riding, knowing exactly what gear to shift to, etc...

WQO6BEaFocVhjMH4Xhpl8wOyp9qTFItc07gqGvXa

Share this comment


Link to comment

I bought a folding bike.

Have always thought of these as oddities, but never considered using one. You can bring it on commuter trains (yes, during peak hours), some buildings - still, not all buildings are bike friendly, guess especially for older buildings that may be historical landmarks don't want you scratching them up. You can put it in the car trunk and still have plenty of space, no need for a bike rack.

Instead of going all in and buying something like a Brompton, which starts at 1,200 USD and can go up to 4,000 easily, for a bike yes (it's built in London, high quality craftsmanship, etc...), dipped the toes into the water and paid $180 for a simple single speed 20 pound made in China. It's not the best build, there's some rattling, it doesn't fold up to the smallest size, but it's actually not a bad deal, considering a Citibike membership costs 160, 170 ish USD, annually. You can't go as fast, steering is a little dodgier but you get used to it and it's really light. I can fit the bike and two golf bags in the trunk, maybe bike, bag and push cart. Have yet to figure out locking it up, don't want to carry a seat around and can't fit the lock cable through the seat post. Wonder if someone would steal the handlebars too. 

Anyways, my traveling options have opened up and the Urbana has saved me time and money already, if it stays together, it'll be well worth the price and if I get hooked on the concept of a folding bike, may upgrade. Now I have a road, mountain, commuter and folding bike. Mountain bike's gonna gather dust.

71K5rAT3UjL._SL1500_.jpg

 

I quit Citibike.

Empty stations, full stations, broken bikes, not docked charges that took 15 minute call to undo, monopoly - doesn't allow competition. Don't get me wrong, it's a life changer for many people and I'm glad it's expanding, but it doesn't fit my use case. Until it allows competitors, convinces me the chances of me being charged 1200 dollars for a bike that I properly docked are close to nil, I'm out.

Share this comment


Link to comment

I have to say this is where I stand for the most part. More than a few holier than thou cyclists out there.

Quote

But before readers decry this as a fossil-fuel enthusiast’s rant, consider these facts: I cycle to the office at least four months a year, walking and taking transit the rest of the time. I don’t drive much, but have a car and a driver’s perspective, as well as a cyclist’s. From those vantage points, here are a few ways I see the pedal-pushing revolution going awry:

The Right to Die:

A car turns right from a main street onto a side street and the driver’s focus is on one thing: the pedestrians crossing the intersection in front of them. They are not looking for cyclists speeding up from behind, swerving in front of them just as they’re about to complete the turn. And yet this happens constantly, cyclists putting their lives on the line in the process. The rules are clear: the car in front turning right has priority; the cyclist has to go around to the automobile’s left or, God forbid, wait a second or two.

Quote

Manners!:

Almost daily, I watch a cyclist ride up alongside a car and slam his or her palm against a window, make an obscene gesture, or shout epithets at the occupants for seemingly inadvertent – or non-existent – offences. This usually occurs after some death-defying slalom through traffic went amiss. Drivers do stupid things sometimes, but cyclists cannot expect the rest of the traffic to essentially part and let them through unencumbered. They’re just another vehicle that should be observing the rules.

I joined the bicycle revolution, but my comrades are worse than I expected

Tom Blackwell: From my vantage points as a driver and cyclist, here are a few ways I see the pedal-pushing revolution going awry

http://nationalpost.com/opinion/lets-stop-treating-drivers-as-villains-and-bicyclists-as-angels

Share this comment


Link to comment

Finally got around to test riding a Brompton the other day, forgot the name of the model, there are so many, it had 6 gears I think, went for around 1600 USD. Compared to riding my entry level single speed, it is a much tighter ride and having the gears is much better, I think the Brompton's tires are 100 psi and mine are 40 psi, that makes a difference as well. The Brompton build quality is excellent and folding up is a cinch after you learn the moves. Still muddled as to whether it's worth the cost, will have to try other brands, like Dahon, etc...

Share this comment


Link to comment

Guest
Add a comment...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...