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A Journey of a Thousand Miles

billchao

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I got back into working out towards the beginning of the year. I used to lift back when I was a teenager so I have a solid background and it turns out I was in decent shape because of work. I'm paying a lot of attention to doing things with proper form even if it means I'm using lighter weight, because building the proper foundation is important to me as a more mature person, but also because I'm significantly more prone to injury these days than when I was a teenager. I find I enjoy doing exercises that I avoided in the past like core stuff and supplemental lifts.

I do have a confession to make, though: I have never liked running. Didn't do it much as part of my fitness routine as a teenager and didn't do it much up to this point. One day last week I just said f*** it, this is supposed to be about growing as a person, right? It was time to suck it up and get over whatever issues I had with it and just do it.

So I did. On Friday I ran a mile for the first time in over a decade. Didn't push myself and clocked in a respectable 9:48. It was actually better than I thought I was going to do, TBH. Went out again yesterday after work and ran 9:04. I can probably push it below the nine minute mark, though it probably already is because the track in the park by my house is slightly longer than a quarter mile. Next time I'm going to see if I can run two miles and eventually work my way up to 5K.

I'm actually excited about this, seeing how well I can run and trying to improve it. It's kind of like the way I approach golf. It's funny because I used to hate running. Now I'm researching clothing for different weather and waterproof socks. I've always said that if I started playing golf as a teenager, I probably wouldn't been disciplined enough to stick with it. Seeing now that my entire attitude towards running has changed as I've matured, I'm more confident than ever at the validity of that statement.



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Run Forrest, Run!

It is a great exercise. I wish I could do it, but the knees have had enough. If you have grass or a trail to run on, it can make it a bit easier in the joints to start out.

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Kudos to @billchao. Taking care of one's health at any age is very important.

Due to injuries, and repairs, my running is limited to more of really fast walk for less than 200 yards at a time. That said, I can walk an average of 2.5 mph for several hours at a time. This over various elevation changes. 

For golfers, (imo) the legs are so important to a proper golf swing. Running and/or walking as an exercise can only enhance one's golf swing.  

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Awesome Bill! Like Scott I just don’t have the knees for running great lengths anymore. I ran cross country in high school but that’s the extent of my ‘running history.’ Good for you and I’m sure you’ll make the 5k in no time!

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1 hour ago, boogielicious said:

If you have grass or a trail to run on, it can make it a bit easier in the joints to start out.

It's asphalt. I could theoretically run in the grass next to the path, but with the rain we've been having lately I'm probably safer on the pavement.

57 minutes ago, Patch said:

Due to injuries, and repairs, my running is limited to more of really fast walk for less than 200 yards at a time. That said, I can walk an average of 2.5 mph for several hours at a time. This over various elevation changes.

Walking is certainly better than not exercising at all.

21 minutes ago, Vinsk said:

I ran cross country in high school but that’s the extent of my ‘running history.’

Ironically, I was asked to join both the golf team and the cross country team in high school, which I declined to do. I guess they just needed another warm body on the roster sheet 😜

24 minutes ago, Vinsk said:

Good for you and I’m sure you’ll make the 5k in no time!

Thanks!

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Congrats on your running.   If you want real motivation, sign up for a 5k race.   Have a goal.   Races aren't for everyone but thought I'd drop the idea.  Good luck moving forward.

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25 minutes ago, dennyjones said:

Congrats on your running.   If you want real motivation, sign up for a 5k race.   Have a goal.   Races aren't for everyone but thought I'd drop the idea.  Good luck moving forward.

I will at some point. I want to make sure I can actually run 5k before I sign up for a race.

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I miss running. My knees just won’t support it any longer. I can still do an elliptical, but it just isn’t the same as pounding the pavement. 

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Been 'running' on and off with the wife a bit. 2 miles does it these days. According to her 14 mins/mile iqualifies a brisk walk. Hah.

Edited by GolfLug

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On 7/26/2019 at 9:05 PM, CarlSpackler said:

I miss running. My knees just won’t support it any longer. I can still do an elliptical, but it just isn’t the same as pounding the pavement. 

I refuse to use a machine. Ask me again in 15 years when my knees are shot 😜

9 minutes ago, GolfLug said:

Been 'running' on and off with the wife a bit. 2 miles does it these days.

I ran 1.5 the other day, then I got busy so haven't been out since. I'm going to go for 2 miles tomorrow. Goal is 8 total miles this week.

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Keep up the good work, Bill! I'm 30 and started working out again after several years of little physical activity. Tired of being 350 lbs. And I kind of started in conjunction with playing golf because it seems like you'd be a better player all around if you're fit.

I share your dislike for running. Glad you've been able to stick with it.

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Good work men. I hate running also, but i really enjoy going out with my bicycle. So i go out twice a week and lift some weigth when i return home. Best shape ever, good stamina, low body fat and groing muscules. 

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20 hours ago, weifert said:

Keep up the good work, Bill! I'm 30 and started working out again after several years of little physical activity. Tired of being 350 lbs. And I kind of started in conjunction with playing golf because it seems like you'd be a better player all around if you're fit.

Good for you! Fitness is important. My reasons for fitness are not golf-related and I think that's the best way to approach it.

20 hours ago, weifert said:

I share your dislike for running. Glad you've been able to stick with it.

Start slow, maybe with long walks at a brisk pace. Do it a few times a week and make it part of your routine.

18 hours ago, p1n9183 said:

Good work men. I hate running also, but i really enjoy going out with my bicycle. So i go out twice a week and lift some weigth when i return home. Best shape ever, good stamina, low body fat and groing muscules. 

Cool, keep up the good work!


So I didn't run at all this week and I haven't worked out since Tuesday because I've been really fatigued. I think I figured it out and I'm not eating enough.

So now I'm trying to add more calories into my day, but I've shut down my workouts for the rest of the week to let myself recover. Back at it Monday.

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Since I've been a runner for over 50 years, and am a current high school track and cross country coach, I feel qualified to comment.  Most people deciding "to get back in shape" start running way too fast.  They become exhausted, winded, tired, and sore.  It's an unpleasant feeling, so the training period is short lived. I tell people to start running very gently, a comfortable pace, where you can carry on a conversation with a partner without being out of breath. It might not be faster than a brisk walk.  Do that for 15 minutes and try to increase by 10% a week.  This is effective for conditioning, cardiovascular health, weight control, and just plain feeling good.  Doing this, many adults become pretty fit and enjoy the running much more.  You simply don't have to train like you're going to the olympics and exhaust yourselves.

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3 minutes ago, Carolina Doc said:

Since I've been a runner for over 50 years, and am a current high school track and cross country coach, I feel qualified to comment.  Most people deciding "to get back in shape" start running way too fast.  They become exhausted, winded, tired, and sore.  It's an unpleasant feeling, so the training period is short lived. I tell people to start running very gently, a comfortable pace, where you can carry on a conversation with a partner without being out of breath. It might not be faster than a brisk walk.  Do that for 15 minutes and try to increase by 10% a week.  This is effective for conditioning, cardiovascular health, weight control, and just plain feeling good.  Doing this, many adults become pretty fit and enjoy the running much more.  You simply don't have to train like you're going to the olympics and exhaust yourselves.

This is pretty much in line with everything I've read about getting into running. It's sound advice, even if it doesn't apply to my situation.

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