Jump to content
barooo

Has Anyone Done Olympic Lifting as Part of Their Routine?

4 posts / 2577 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

I know the stereotype is that golfers skew older and less active, but that's definitely not nearly the whole of it.  I'm definitely not someone to take advice from on any part of the game, but I'm curious if anyone has used olympic lifting or variations (meaning clean & jerk, snatch, or variations like power cleans) in their exercise routine? 

I spent several years learning the olympic lifts while I was taking a break from golf, and I feel like the move you make to drive off the ground in the swing has some commonalities with the 2nd pull in olympic lifting (which is when you explosively pull the bar up from about mid-thigh, explosively extending your hips, your traps, and your ankles) to prepare to catch it), and training myself to do something explosively with a large timing component seems to carry over a bit, if nothing else in terms of thoughts and patterns.  Plus working the lifts has done wonders for my hip and shoulder flexibility and my core strength.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Want to hide this ad? Register for free today!

I do power cleans in my routine. My tennis coach when i was in HS recommended it for me when my biggest weakness was power (wasn't a "golfer" then). And I've kept it in my routine ever since where possible (a lotta gyms don't allow it). I have only personal feeling data on the matter tho, and in that respect I agree with what you wrote and how it feel helpful to my general strength.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As with any sport lifting helps. Olympic lifts are excellent dynamic lifts and train the body to develop power(force/time). This training is both muscular and neural. This type of explosive movement is exactly what is needed in a golf swing and why you see so many professionals doing this type of lifting.

A major reason it is not used more frequently in gyms and workout routines is the risk of injury from using too much weight or bad form. The strain of getting the weight moving and stopping it can be many times the static weight and can injure joints, ligaments or tendons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

We do them as part of our crossfit workouts.  Gotta admit, they are not my favorite.  As said before, go lighter with better form.  What I get sucked into is looking at the men's weight and women's weight on the board.  Being 58 and 143 lbs I hate that the men's prescribed weight is the same for me as it is a 25 year old hulking male.

often times I do something in the middle or the women's weight so I don't hurt myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...