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Hey,

I recently purchased a used Sm7 54° wedge. Upon closer inspection there is a dent on the toe, which makes the slight dent proud on the toe face. Whilst feeling it won't really affect play, it's slightly annoying to the eye. Is there anything I can do to make this good? 

Thanks for your time,

Sam

20190715_120613.jpg

20190715_120550.jpg

20190715_120518.jpg

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3 minutes ago, Sammmmmmyp_456 said:

Hey,

I recently purchased a used Sm7 54° wedge. Upon closer inspection there is a dent on the toe, which makes the slight dent proud on the toe face. Whilst feeling it won't really affect play, it's slightly annoying to the eye. Is there anything I can do to make this good? 

Thanks for your time,

Sam

20190715_120613.jpg

20190715_120550.jpg

20190715_120518.jpg

If you try and grind it out, it will remove the chrome layer and allow rust to happen. Just consider it a badge of honor and play on.

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Thanks for the reply boogie. I kind of had that thought too of the chrome layer disappearing! Little things just really bug me once they've been noticed. Is that a Martin, Taylor, faith, I can see in that pic? 😉

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As @boogielicious it will rust if you file or grind the chrome finish completely off.
If it were mine, I would place the wedge on a hardwood block of wood and lightly tap the bulge portion.
It will flatten out and be less noticeable.
Then lightly file or grind the face and corner edge, not to remove too much of the chrome.

There are club repair specialist, but the cost would be more than replacing the wedge.

The back indentation can only be filled by a welding process.
Then the club grooves would need to be cut to proper depth to allow for re-chroming the club head.
The club head will also be removed and reinstalled after the repair.

They can make it nice and shiny and it will look like new again.

36 minutes ago, Sammmmmmyp_456 said:

Little things just really bug me

The other option is to just replace the club.
Similar like new wedges are relatively inexpensive.

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Place the club head on a piece of wood like the above poster said.  Then take a ball peen hammer and lightly tap on the deformed part of the face.  It should go back somewhat flat.  If needed you can also tap on the sole part.  Do one then the other to get it as flat as you can.  Forget about sanding/scraping/filing.  Those will do more harm than good.  

I garnered a set of Ping I200s of eBay a while back and the 7 iron had a nick on  the sole.  No one would bid because of that. Got em for a steel.  Hammered the nick flat on the sole and then hammered from the sole.  Now you can't even notice where the nick was.  

HTH

Edited by denkea

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I'll add an additional tip when trying to hammer the dented area.
It will help to have someone hold the club by the shaft area and the person doing the hammering hold the face of the club head.
Trying to do this alone can be done, but having a helping hand makes it easier.

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It will be simpler to work on if you pull the shaft first.

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Guys.  This isn't re-forging or re-casting a club or using a sledge hammer to do the work.  The steel used (forged or cast) is not a very hard steel to begin with.  lightly tapping will do the trick.  You can hold the head in one hand.  Rest the shaft on the wall and tap and then turn over and hold the head from the crown and tap the sole.  Easy peasy.  

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On 7/15/2019 at 2:53 PM, denkea said:

Place the club head on a piece of wood like the above poster said.  Then take a ball peen hammer and lightly tap on the deformed part of the face.  It should go back somewhat flat.  If needed you can also tap on the sole part.  Do one then the other to get it as flat as you can.  Forget about sanding/scraping/filing.  Those will do more harm than good.  

I garnered a set of Ping I200s of eBay a while back and the 7 iron had a nick on  the sole.  No one would bid because of that. Got em for a steel.  Hammered the nick flat on the sole and then hammered from the sole.  Now you can't even notice where the nick was.  

HTH

What he said, DONT grind anything here, its NOT needed.
A hammer with a clean flat face, small LIGHT taps...many of them, and you will be able to "push it back" where it belongs. Its called "cold forging", and thats was "good enough" on weapon parts when i was a Gun Smith in the army, so its more than good enough on Golf clubs.

Its a 5-10 minutes job, NO grinding or sanding, ONLY the hammer.....so thats "hammer time", and so easy you will be amazed. Just remember NO FORCE, only light small taps so dont use a "heavy hammer", but a small light one.

And DO NOT fix the club head in a Vise, then you risk to hit loft or lie out of specs like PING adjust some club heads, so just hold it in one hand, and use the other for the hammer
 

Edited by Howard Jones

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