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This is my first post so please be nice.

I purchased my first set of golf irons after doing lots of research on beginner irons I went for a set of second hand TM Rsi1's I got them quite cheap as the 7 iron needs Re shafting.

On closer inspection it seams like most of the iron heads have started pulling away from the shafts. 

I've decided on giving the re shafting a go myself but I'm not sure what ferrules I need.

Any advice on the re shafting process would be much appreciated

Thanks in advance

15696596000238127623828707784239.jpg

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3 hours ago, Lewis55555 said:

This is my first post so please be nice.

I purchased my first set of golf irons after doing lots of research on beginner irons I went for a set of second hand TM Rsi1's I got them quite cheap as the 7 iron needs Re shafting.

On closer inspection it seams like most of the iron heads have started pulling away from the shafts. 

I've decided on giving the re shafting a go myself but I'm not sure what ferrules I need.

Any advice on the re shafting process would be much appreciated

Thanks in advance

15696596000238127623828707784239.jpg

Looks like they have pulled away, especially the bottom one. They need to be re-epoxied. A golf shop can do them pretty fast. I think Golf Galaxy charges $3-4 per club.

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You are going to need .370 tip ferrules, that is the inside diameter. As far as outside diameter, you need to get a caliper and measure the outside diameter of the hosel to see what you need. Ideally you would buy ferrules that have a slightly larger OD than the hosel so you could turn them down, however that can be intimidating to many new club builders. If you don't want to mess with it at all, you can get ferrules that are slightly smaller OD than the hosel and not have to do anything with them. Club builders will shake their heads at this but it works and still looks okay when you're all done.

Shameless self promotion. If you look up Mobile Clubmaker on Youtube, I have a series of videos on club making including ones specifically on installing and turning down ferrules if you want to do it the professional way. Best of luck.

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Just these two or the whole set is looking like so ?

On second thought, if these two had problem then, probably should redo the whole set.

If you have done this before, the ferrules can be saved,  it might take extra effort but can be done.  Otherwise use a caliper to measure the dimension of the OD of the top of the ferrule and order the length you want in a collared ferrule.

It matters not whether it's a .355 or the ,370 advertised ferrule.  The tapered section of a .355 shaft is but about 5/8" down the very end of the tip of the shaft , all shafts measure at .370 just above the ferrule.  Since the OEM used the collared ferrule ( which means they coned the hosel at the top to accept epoxy to prevent the ferrule slipping) , obviously in this case is the failure of the epoxy cause the slippage, or by storing the golf club in the trunk of the car in the hot Summer days, the shafting epoxy will soften at temperature over 100 degree F and starting to break down at about 120 degree F.

If the set of clubs had been sitting in temperature over 100 degrees F for hours and taken out to be played immediately then this could happen.

This is why most of the golf club builders use a slow cure epoxy which will resist heat break down a little better than the 5 minute tour ( fast ) cure epoxy.

If you want to spend some time to save the ferrule. wrap the plastic ferrule with leather or paper towel dowsed with the cool gel to prevent direct heat from pulling the shaft ( I just wet the material with water and keep it wet).  Heat up the hosel and full the steel shaft.  Careful not to touch the warmed up plastic ferrule to deform it.  Clean up the old epoxy on the ferrule shaft and inside the tip and of course the hosel inspect and dry fit before you mix the new batch of epoxy.

not a rocket science, it takes some practice.

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21 minutes ago, Release said:

 

It matters not whether it's a .355 or the ,370 advertised ferrule.  The tapered section of a .355 shaft is but about 5/8" down the very end of the tip of the shaft , all shafts measure at .370 just above the ferrule.  

This is not true. You can not use a .355 ferrule on a .370 tip shaft. I will not fit. These are .370 irons, so you will need the matching size ferrule. You can go the other way and use a .370 ferrule on a .355 shaft, and I often do, but not the other way.

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51 minutes ago, Release said:

Just these two or the whole set is looking like so ?

On second thought, if these two had problem then, probably should redo the whole set.

If you have done this before, the ferrules can be saved,  it might take extra effort but can be done.  Otherwise use a caliper to measure the dimension of the OD of the top of the ferrule and order the length you want in a collared ferrule.

It matters not whether it's a .355 or the ,370 advertised ferrule.  The tapered section of a .355 shaft is but about 5/8" down the very end of the tip of the shaft , all shafts measure at .370 just above the ferrule.  Since the OEM used the collared ferrule ( which means they coned the hosel at the top to accept epoxy to prevent the ferrule slipping) , obviously in this case is the failure of the epoxy cause the slippage, or by storing the golf club in the trunk of the car in the hot Summer days, the shafting epoxy will soften at temperature over 100 degree F and starting to break down at about 120 degree F.

If the set of clubs had been sitting in temperature over 100 degrees F for hours and taken out to be played immediately then this could happen.

This is why most of the golf club builders use a slow cure epoxy which will resist heat break down a little better than the 5 minute tour ( fast ) cure epoxy.

If you want to spend some time to save the ferrule. wrap the plastic ferrule with leather or paper towel dowsed with the cool gel to prevent direct heat from pulling the shaft ( I just wet the material with water and keep it wet).  Heat up the hosel and full the steel shaft.  Careful not to touch the warmed up plastic ferrule to deform it.  Clean up the old epoxy on the ferrule shaft and inside the tip and of course the hosel inspect and dry fit before you mix the new batch of epoxy.

not a rocket science, it takes some practice.

Thanks for the advice. I think I'll change the ferrule as well. It seams like a bad epoxy job to be honest. 

Is it worth getting some golf shaft epoxy or just some strong 24 hour set resin epoxy

2 hours ago, Adam C said:

You are going to need .370 tip ferrules, that is the inside diameter. As far as outside diameter, you need to get a caliper and measure the outside diameter of the hosel to see what you need. Ideally you would buy ferrules that have a slightly larger OD than the hosel so you could turn them down, however that can be intimidating to many new club builders. If you don't want to mess with it at all, you can get ferrules that are slightly smaller OD than the hosel and not have to do anything with them. Club builders will shake their heads at this but it works and still looks okay when you're all done.

Shameless self promotion. If you look up Mobile Clubmaker on Youtube, I have a series of videos on club making including ones specifically on installing and turning down ferrules if you want to do it the professional way. Best of luck.

I just watched one of you YouTube tutorials about ferrules and doesn't seam too hard. 

I have everything apart from epoxy and ferrules.

Any recommendations on epoxy. I'm from the UK so may be different brands here.

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If you are new to golf why would attempt to do this yourself? IMHO take the clubs to an experienced shop/person to have them done.

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9 minutes ago, cooke119 said:

If you are new to golf why would attempt to do this yourself? IMHO take the clubs to an experienced shop/person to have them done.

I'd like to give it a go to be honest. I have all the tools needed it's just the epoxy and ferrules in need.

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15 minutes ago, cooke119 said:

If you are new to golf why would attempt to do this yourself? IMHO take the clubs to an experienced shop/person to have them done.

Being a new golfer and having the mechanical aptitude to be able to assemble clubs are not directly related.

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1 hour ago, Lewis55555 said:

Thanks for the advice. I think I'll change the ferrule as well. It seams like a bad epoxy job to be honest. 

Is it worth getting some golf shaft epoxy or just some strong 24 hour set resin epoxy

I just watched one of you YouTube tutorials about ferrules and doesn't seam too hard. 

I have everything apart from epoxy and ferrules.

Any recommendations on epoxy. I'm from the UK so may be different brands here.

3M brand is a good one for epoxy. The DP420 two part is used by many OEMs. When it comes down to it, most 2 part epoxies will work as long as they have a lap/shear strength of 2500-4000 psi.

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2 hours ago, Adam C said:

This is not true. You can not use a .355 ferrule on a .370 tip shaft. I will not fit. These are .370 irons, so you will need the matching size ferrule. You can go the other way and use a .370 ferrule on a .355 shaft, and I often do, but not the other way.

Well, let's measure the diameter over the hosel length. they're all .370.

Don't tell me that they've changed the taper tip to more than 5/8" these days ?  Something new to me.

Edited by Release

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2 hours ago, Lewis55555 said:

Thanks for the advice. I think I'll change the ferrule as well. It seams like a bad epoxy job to be honest. 

Is it worth getting some golf shaft epoxy or just some strong 24 hour set resin epoxy

I just watched one of you YouTube tutorials about ferrules and doesn't seam too hard. 

I have everything apart from epoxy and ferrules.

Any recommendations on epoxy. I'm from the UK so may be different brands here.

If you can get the long cure shaft epoxy ( 24 hr. ) be the better choice, any reputable source will be fine.  Most of these epoxy all came from the same source in bulk volume then the store will package them into smaller retail samples.

Many of us had used off the shelve two parts epoxy for golf.  What you're looking for are the shear strength and the breakdown temperature.  There is a minimum shear strength you want in the golf epoxy and of course lower break down temperature ( 120-130 F).. You can basically use any type of two part long cure epoxy from 3M or the other major OEM for adhesive.  If, you don't care to change the shaft in the future.  The low temperature break down point is to allow easier access for removing the shaft for repair or replacement.  Steel shaft is okay to use some stronger epoxy with higher break down temperature point.  Graphite shaft is a must to use lower temperature break down point for the simple reason that you do not want to toast the layers of graphite sheets that made the shaft from high temperature if you wish to re-use the shaft.

If the ferrule is tight from the supplier ( it happens since high quality control is not essential to manufacturing the plastic ferrule )  use a rat tail file, passing through the Inner sides of the ferrule to get it fit.  A larger ID of ferule is often not usable, cause can't make it smaller to fit ( can tape the shaft to make it fit but not often done ).

Larger OD of the ferrule can also be fixed .  If you have a belt sander with linen belt, you can turn the ferrule to fit the smaller hosel, or hand sand and polish off the difference ( time consuming ).

Again, after you had done it a few times, it's not difficult if you like to work with your hands and have the average of life experience.  It's not like cut and dry, don't need to have the exact parts and many different way could make it work.

Of course, the exact replacement OEM parts will make life a little easier.  No brainer to just put the parts together and epoxy them.

Edited by Release

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46 minutes ago, Lewis55555 said:

I'd like to give it a go to be honest. I have all the tools needed it's just the epoxy and ferrules in need.

Careful, working with the golf clubs can be as addictive as playing the game.

In fact, not too too long ago, playing the game and working on the equipment are two peas in a pod.    Have fun.

The only advice I can give you is, start with some older equipment to practice if you had never done it in the past, just in case you mess it up ( hard to do but it could happen ).  And open your mind to all possibilities and to think for yourself.

It's a piece of cake than repairing other tools you might have in the household.

 

Edited by Release

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