Jump to content
mey123

Instruction/Lessons

11 posts / 1132 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

Hey Everyone,

I introduced myself a while back, and have sat in the corner and have tried to read every part¬†of this site (I have almost made it through all the rules threads, almost¬†ūüė®). I had a few questions that I hope you all could help me with.

I have spent the last 2 months at the range/backyard with limited distance balls (foam/plastic/birdie balls), and have yet to go to the course (want to feel a bit more confident with people around in case they pair me up with others). I have hit 1000's of balls so far (I thought i would hate the range part of starting out again, but its really nice, especially being able to hit the range at my lunch break (mountain branch GC near Abingdon, MD).

1. I am swinging and hitting the ball MUCH better than 2 months ago. Out of 100 balls, only a handful refuse to get airborn (thinning?), but I am certain I need lessons as I have no idea on what i should be feeling/looking for to correct things. But I am not sure on how to find a "good" coach. I see a lot near home (York, PA), and down near my office in Maryland, but not sure how to choose 1 vs the other. Any input would be great on this.  I feel like i fall into the Malaska swing style as he was the first guy i found online that i can relate a swing too (baseball background), but being so new, i have no clue what to look/feel for in the swing. I have also considered signing up for his online teachings, but I honestly do not know if that would go well, as I am so new, and could be thinking one thing and doing another.

2. I bought second hand clubs. Ping i5 irons (3-9), Ping G2 Driver (8.5), Ping G5 3 wood and PW, and the Ping Tour Gorge 56SS SW. I spent a bit more than I initially wanted, but I did not want to go the complete set route (bad experience). My question is, Can i get those fit for me and adjusted, without buying new clubs? I want to buy all new, but there is no way I will justify that until i get better and spend a bunch of time on the course.

 

Thanks

 

Edited by mey123

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finding a coach is like dating or looking for a home. You need to find the right one for you. A few items I would throw out.

Cost and commitment are a key questions: How much time will you commit? 

Do you understand their communication style?

Set up an interview. Most instructors will chat for a few minutes but if you like them I would offer to play for 20-30 min to discuss how they would go about achieving your goals. Some will not tell you details but give you a general road map.

After that it is about results and trust. Especially when you are starting out thing may get WAY worse if you are making a big change and you have to believe that they know where you are going and that it will work.

 

Just my experience

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

On golf instruction: "What is said-vs-What is meant-vs-What is heard, will equal a can of worms". No I didn't make that up. I read it some where, and thought it made sense..

Finding the right golf instructor can take a bit of search. My best advice is to talk with a perspective swing guru, to see if you two are compatible.

Tell the instructor up front what you are looking to accomplish. 

Talk about swing instruction terminology, so you both understand what's being said. 

As a student, who employs the golf instructor, don't be afraid toask questions when you don't understand something. It's your money, you are entitled to know what is being taught, and why. 

Once you find your swing guru, take copious notes on what is being taught. Write your own personal golf instruction book. It will come in handy in years to come. 

Also, should you find an instructor you are making progress with, stick with him/her for as long as you continue to improve. It could be months, even years of an instruction partnership. I had the same instructor for several years. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Thank you both. I have found 2 or 3 local to me that seem to be highly thought of. Thanks for the help, made me ease up a bit and give it a shot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Patch makes some good points about taking notes,setting goals and asking questions.

 

When I take a lesson (and I do frequently), I always make sure to leave with a set of drills, goals and metrics.

Like all goals they should be specific, measurable, achievable, and timely. You need to leave a session knowing what you will be working on (Not just better posture but making sure to bend from the hip when taking your stance, know that you will get into the position by standing tall and hinging from the hips while keeping the abdominal tight, you can confirm that it is correct by placing a hand on your stomach or hanging a club from your shoulder..., if it is a dynamic act then the goal should be something like starting all shots right of the target line and turning back towards the center-line 90% AVOID "hit it straighter", and Lastly you should set the time for your next lesson before you leave. Setting a lesson could be a specific time OR when you reach a certain measurable goal.

Good luck. It is a journey but if you take it in small bits you will get there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

1 hour ago, criley4way said:

Patch makes some good points about taking notes,setting goals and asking questions.

 

When I take a lesson (and I do frequently), I always make sure to leave with a set of drills, goals and metrics.

Like all goals they should be specific, measurable, achievable, and timely. You need to leave a session knowing what you will be working on (Not just better posture but making sure to bend from the hip when taking your stance, know that you will get into the position by standing tall and hinging from the hips while keeping the abdominal tight, you can confirm that it is correct by placing a hand on your stomach or hanging a club from your shoulder..., if it is a dynamic act then the goal should be something like starting all shots right of the target line and turning back towards the center-line 90% AVOID "hit it straighter", and Lastly you should set the time for your next lesson before you leave. Setting a lesson could be a specific time OR when you reach a certain measurable goal.

Good luck. It is a journey but if you take it in small bits you will get there.

Thank you (and Patch). This was super helpful. Absolutely want to go over all the stuff you mention, and was hoping to get drills from the lesson to practice at home. I can usually spare 30-60 minutes a day at home chipping, putting, hitting some practice balls after the kids get put down for the night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, criley4way said:

Like all goals they should be specific, measurable, achievable, and timely.

You forgot relevant (ūüėܬ†sorry couldn't help it, I work for a company that uses SMART goal setting as part of our yearly performance plans).

But this is great advice. After I started taking lessons, a huge challenge for me was learning how to practice what I had been taught. I have one hour of instruction per month, and I leave with new knowledge and things to work on, but the next 30 days are 100% my responsibility. My practice routine used to be going to the range, hitting a couple large buckets of balls with no real purpose. Bad shot, hit another ball, that one was good, okay swing is working. You definitely want to make sure you're practicing well.

After each lesson my instructor sends me a ~5-6 minute video summary of all the things we covered in the lesson, as well as some things to practice. I find the video summary really helpful as I have never been a note taker, and I can archive the emails to go back to specific lessons and revisit them. This might be something you want to look for with instruction if available from your local instructors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

32 minutes ago, Darkfrog said:

You forgot relevant (ūüėܬ†sorry couldn't help it, I work for a company that uses SMART goal setting as part of our yearly performance plans).

But this is great advice. After I started taking lessons, a huge challenge for me was learning how to practice what I had been taught. I have one hour of instruction per month, and I leave with new knowledge and things to work on, but the next 30 days are 100% my responsibility. My practice routine used to be going to the range, hitting a couple large buckets of balls with no real purpose. Bad shot, hit another ball, that one was good, okay swing is working. You definitely want to make sure you're practicing well.

After each lesson my instructor sends me a ~5-6 minute video summary of all the things we covered in the lesson, as well as some things to practice. I find the video summary really helpful as I have never been a note taker, and I can archive the emails to go back to specific lessons and revisit them. This might be something you want to look for with instruction if available from your local instructors.

DarkFrog,

 

I know but I kind of thought that golf instruction by definition was Relevant. Now to work on Six-Sigma for my approach shots ūüėȬ†

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

2 hours ago, Darkfrog said:

You forgot relevant (ūüėܬ†sorry couldn't help it, I work for a company that uses SMART goal setting as part of our yearly performance plans).

But this is great advice. After I started taking lessons, a huge challenge for me was learning how to practice what I had been taught. I have one hour of instruction per month, and I leave with new knowledge and things to work on, but the next 30 days are 100% my responsibility. My practice routine used to be going to the range, hitting a couple large buckets of balls with no real purpose. Bad shot, hit another ball, that one was good, okay swing is working. You definitely want to make sure you're practicing well.

After each lesson my instructor sends me a ~5-6 minute video summary of all the things we covered in the lesson, as well as some things to practice. I find the video summary really helpful as I have never been a note taker, and I can archive the emails to go back to specific lessons and revisit them. This might be something you want to look for with instruction if available from your local instructors.

I just got back to the range and worked on some things, and you hit the nail on the head with "Bad shot, hit another ball, that one was good, okay swing is working". Hoping that I can find a good instructor soon. Will be making calls this week at some point. 

I am a note taker by nature (i have a terrible memory, and forget things pretty easily), but i am intrigued by the video comment you made. Do they film you? or do they tend to send you a self video of things to work on? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, mey123 said:

I am a note taker by nature (i have a terrible memory, and forget things pretty easily), but i am intrigued by the video comment you made. Do they film you? or do they tend to send you a self video of things to work on? 

Where I take my lessons (indoor facility), the entire lesson is recorded with down the line and face on cameras and can be analyzed / dissected using software. I think it's called Swing Catalyst.

The lesson starts with a conversation of how my game is going, and then I warm up and start making some swings, usually 7-iron unless I ask for help with a specific club. Then we have a conversation/analysis where she highlights things that are working well and things that need adjustment. Then the she'll give me something to try for the next series of swings to help me make the adjustment (drill, new feel, etc.), and then repeat the analysis on video.

At the end of the lesson, the she compiles the highlights of the lesson into a single video and sends it to me via email.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

14 minutes ago, Darkfrog said:

Where I take my lessons (indoor facility), the entire lesson is recorded with down the line and face on cameras and can be analyzed / dissected using software. I think it's called Swing Catalyst.

The lesson starts with a conversation of how my game is going, and then I warm up and start making some swings, usually 7-iron unless I ask for help with a specific club. Then we have a conversation/analysis where she highlights things that are working well and things that need adjustment. Then the she'll give me something to try for the next series of swings to help me make the adjustment (drill, new feel, etc.), and then repeat the analysis on video.

At the end of the lesson, the she compiles the highlights of the lesson into a single video and sends it to me via email.

That is really cool. One of the instructors I am looking at is located at an indoor facility. He is a bit more pricey than the golf clubs near me, but a conversation with them should lead me in the right direction. Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




√ó
√ó
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...