Jump to content
IGNORED

General COVID-19 Topic


Recommended Posts

  • Moderator
17 minutes ago, flopster said:

Though it hasn't been years since getting the vaccine my 83 year old stepmother got the Pfizer vaccine this past January and up until now has had no adverse side effects, also my 91 year old mother has had the Moderna vaccine last March with zero side effects. Bottom line is these are safe take them not just for yourself but for everyone around you.

My 87 year old mother, who has survived ovarian cancer only got a sore arm with Pfizer. And she also has a weak immune system do to kidney issues. She got hers the second it was available. Sad that healthy people are foolish not to get it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

  • Replies 2.6k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

(edited)
2 hours ago, David in FL said:

Yep.

And I did so voluntarily, after doing my research.And I did so voluntarily, after doing my research.

My bet would be that you haven't, because you must've used the term "side affect" 20 times.

You are not going to change your opinion. We get that. In the face of overwhelming evidence, you persist in pretending to yourself that you are making a deeply considered, logical and thoughtful decision. You just don't want to take it because you are anti something which a lot of people, for some inexplicable reason, think has a political dimension to it.

You passively aggressively taunt people about masks by "non judgementally asking the question".

If I had to wear a mask on planes and buses for the next 5 years I wouldn't give a damn. If the price of a healthy population is short term vigilance and extra care, I'll pay it with pleasure.

Honestly, reading  you tying yourself in knots trying to defend the indefensible is like listening to someone trying to prove that 9/11 didn't happen because of the boiling temperature of some liquid or melting point of a metal they wouldn't be able to distinguish from a piece of wood.

Here is a couple  in India comparing their research and debating whether "long term" means 6 months, 2 years or 10 years.

 

covid-19-india-crisis-surge-infections-full-003.jpg__2100x1400_q85_crop_subject_location-1050,700_subsampling-2_upscale.jpg

Edited by Shorty
Link to post
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, Shorty said:

You are not going to change your opinion. We get that. In the face of overwhelming evidence, you persist in pretending to yourself that you are making a deeply considered, logical and thoughtful decision. You just don't want to take it because you are anti something which a lot of people, for some inexplicable reason, think has a political dimension to it.

Bravo.-That summarizes my objections to the whole thing.

My club has had five members or member spouses die of COVID-19.-But we do not know if we will need a booster David says-Who the f*** cares if we need a booster if we can do something in the short term to kick this virus in the nuts?\-Right here and now!

They will even let you wear a red hat to get your vaccine, David. Or a blue one. Or no hat at all, and they have gotten pretty good at it-You can get it in less time than it takes you to play a few holes-Even you mr. speedy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

AgEXQTVwc3drVXNFUUJlU1ZrMEFvbUhaSUEAMA

People who have been fully vaccinated should still follow precautions in doctor’s offices...

 

Fully Vaccinated People Can Stop Wearing Face Masks, Physical Distancing in Most Settings, CDC Says

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

(edited)

Some good information on breakthrough cases in the link attached, and also this comment:

“When people hear about breakthrough infections, they automatically think ‘oh, these vaccines are not working’ or ‘they’re not effective,’” says Richard Teran, an epidemiologist with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Epidemic Intelligence Service. “That is just not true … the majority of individuals who do get the vaccine are protected against COVID infection and also from severe disease.”

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/coronavirus-covid-vaccines-breakthrough-infections-variants

Edited by iacas
fixed formatted text - please begin doing this before you post, Billy Z
Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

8 minutes ago, ncates00 said:
 

 

Fully Vaccinated People Can Stop Wearing Face Masks, Physical Distancing in Most Settings, CDC Says

But.....but.......that's discrimination against people who don't trust the MSM and do their own research!!!!!!

When are they going to make up their minds? I thought we were supposed to wear masks. The CDC just flip flops all the time.

A year ago it was masks and social distancing. So they admit that that was BS.

Now the elites (sheeple) who have been "vaccinated" with poison are given a privilege that independent people believe is a right. It's COMMUNISM!!!!! 

(joking)

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 5/5/2021 at 10:16 AM, mattm16 said:

I don't necessarily agree with that.  I know of people not getting the vaccine, and they are not uncaring.  For me, I do not think I need the vaccine.  I just don't.  The odds that I've seen of something majorly happening to me if I get COVID is small (and I do have a heart condition).  However, I am getting the vaccine for my friends/family.  They know that I don't think I need it; I'm doing it for them, not for me.

This is really a major reason to get the vaccine. Were COVID primarily a threat to the individual I wouldn’t care, however until this virus is at an extremely low level community spread present a risk to everyone. You might be fine but you can transmit to someone at risk.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

3 hours ago, Double Mocha Man said:

I have seen this before.  It may strike a nerve with David, bless his heart.  Putting forth a ton of "I want to wait" babble is oftentimes a cover up for something else, something that person is unwilling to share. 

In David's case it may be a strong allegiance to his buddies at the pool hall... he'd look foolish in their eyes if he did get vaccinated.  It may be an abject fear of needles he doesn't want to reveal.  It may be that his parents were anti-vaxers and he still buys in.  Oh hell, it just might have something to do with machismo. 

We will probably never know the real reason behind David's reluctance to be vaccinated.

Humans have a way of talking around things they don't want to deal with.

I’m getting a real vibe of Marty McCoy being called chicken here…and I love it!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

@David in FL
I used to think the exact way you did and then realized I was still buying into the paranoia over COVID being some special virus. Knowing that it is a strain of a well-known virus family and that the core vaccine technology itself was not developed in response to this pandemic made the long term effect fear no longer seem reasonable. I did not care about potentially needing a booster because that is not really any different than a flu shot.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The elephant in the room here  - and everyone knows it is as follows:

Not all people of a particular political persuasion are against this and other vaccines.

But all people who are against this and other vaccines are of that particular political persuasion.

@David in FL is pretty obviously seen as a man of sage like wisdom amongst his friends at the pool hall who base their "opinions" on misrepresentations of reality and downright lies. ("Research")

Problem is, when asked to defend his position he puts up straw man "arguments" where the goalposts keep shifting and he can always be seen as being prudent and sensible amongst the uneducated. So freaking what if lay people can't describe to you what the effects will be in 2 years or - the scientists (who, amazingly are on our side) have a pretty good idea and I for one don't feel like a "sheep" for believing them. If they can convince him it's safe after 2 years he'll scratch his chin, put down his glasses and ask "What about 7 years?". 

When a role model is a national leader who gets his shot in secret for fear of upsetting his followers, it should make one more determined to bow to peer pressure and get the vaccine. Peer pressure meaning giving a shit about your fellow man/woman and children.

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Moderator
1 hour ago, Shorty said:

The elephant in the room here  - and everyone knows it is as follows:

Not all people of a particular political persuasion are against this and other vaccines.

But all people who are against this and other vaccines are of that particular political persuasion.

@David in FL is pretty obviously seen as a man of sage like wisdom amongst his friends at the pool hall who base their "opinions" on misrepresentations of reality and downright lies. ("Research")

Problem is, when asked to defend his position he puts up straw man "arguments" where the goalposts keep shifting and he can always be seen as being prudent and sensible amongst the uneducated. So freaking what if lay people can't describe to you what the effects will be in 2 years or - the scientists (who, amazingly are on our side) have a pretty good idea and I for one don't feel like a "sheep" for believing them. If they can convince him it's safe after 2 years he'll scratch his chin, put down his glasses and ask "What about 7 years?". 

When a role model is a national leader who gets his shot in secret for fear of upsetting his followers, it should make one more determined to bow to peer pressure and get the vaccine. Peer pressure meaning giving a shit about your fellow man/woman and children.

We are not going political in this thread please. Also, I know of people on the opposite side of who you are referring to who are also anti-vaccine sadly. It’s the trust is misinformation that is driving them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Do you remember the discussion in this thread about the upcharge on power golf carts for a single rider during the pandemic? 

On Tuesday I walked into the pro shop and right up to the head pro and complimented him and gave him a shout-out for never up charging me once during the pandemic. And then I paid him full price for a cart rental and went and hopped in it with Mark, both of us fully vaccinated, and drove off to #1 tee.

First time in a year I shared a cart.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

3 minutes ago, Double Mocha Man said:

Do you remember the discussion in this thread about the upcharge on power golf carts for a single rider during the pandemic? 

On Tuesday I walked into the pro shop and right up to the head pro and complimented him and gave him a shout-out for never up charging me once during the pandemic. And then I paid him full price for a cart rental and went and hopped in it with Mark, both of us fully vaccinated, and drove off to #1 tee.

First time in a year I shared a cart.

That's nice! I have always rode with my golf buddies in a cart, even last year before I was vaccinated. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

2 hours ago, boogielicious said:

We are not going political in this thread please. Also, I know of people on the opposite side of who you are referring to who are also anti-vaccine sadly. It’s the trust is misinformation that is driving them.

It’s the lack of information at this point.

Believe what you want. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

15 hours ago, measureoffsetinnm said:

@David in FL
I used to think the exact way you did and then realized I was still buying into the paranoia over COVID being some special virus. Knowing that it is a strain of a well-known virus family and that the core vaccine technology itself was not developed in response to this pandemic made the long term effect fear no longer seem reasonable. I did not care about potentially needing a booster because that is not really any different than a flu shot.

I don’t get flu shots either.

Interestingly only about 50% of the population do get flu shots. The efficacy of the flu shots generally runs about 50% each year as well as they try to predict the strain to target each year.

I suspect if annual shots are required for Covid the compliance in terms of getting them every year will drop dramatically just as it has with the flu.  We’re likely to end up somewhere around 65% - 70% vaccinated for Covid this first go around.  I’d be surprised if it didn’t drop dramatically in subsequent years.  Time will tell...

4 minutes ago, saevel25 said:

I think it is a reluctance to accept that the information we have at hand is good enough. 

 

True.

What one person believes to be “good enough” for them, may not be “good enough” for another.  I don’t disparage either one.

It’s also true that some people simply and blindly do what others that they perceive to be in positions of authority tell them to do.  By the way, that’s not directed at anyone here.  It’s simply stated as a fact.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

As of 9am today Michigan has opened up most things for people that are vaccinated.   People that are fully vaccinated aren't required to wear a mask unless still required by the business.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

(edited)
16 minutes ago, dennyjones said:

As of 9am today Michigan has opened up most things for people that are vaccinated.   People that are fully vaccinated aren't required to wear a mask unless still required by the business.  

But I still want to know how we can tell the vaccinated from the unvaccinated? Will the latter be wearing a scarlet letter "U"  on their chest?

Edited by Double Mocha Man
Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Want to join this community?

    We'd love to have you!

    Sign Up
  • Support TST Affiliates

    TourStriker PlaneMate
    Golfer's Journal
    Whoop
    SuperSpeed
    FlightScope Mevo
    Use the code "iacas" for 10% off Mevo and the code "iacasjun21" for 10% off SuperSpeed.
  • Posts

    • My memories and reviews of the courses we played, finally: Sandbox 10 of 10 Just fun, 40 yards to 170, most under 100 yards, many options to play each hole, including putting, low lofted chip and run, to traditional pitches.  Highlights include 5 or 6 birdies the first two days, 1 over par on day 2 for total 52 strokes.  Also was the first to lose the “no sixes” challenge by going bunker to bunker on Hole 2 on the first day. Mammoth Dunes 8 Huge golf course, first fairway was over 100 yards wide, first green was probably 50 yards wide.  Maybe reading the Golf Club Atlas article helped me, but I was able to discern the major v-shaped ridge the course was built on and around.  Greens were generally pretty welcoming on many sides, in lots of areas a ball would funnel onto the putting surface.  However,  there were a few very deep greenside bunkers, in particular on the short 13th.  I enjoyed the course while playing fairly poorly.  Given the width of most fairways, I think additional rounds would lead a player to explore a variety of angles, there were a lot of ways to play most of the holes.  Or maybe the best way to play a hole would vary significantly depending on pin position.  I’d like to get a chance to figure it out a little more. Sand Valley 7.5 From satellite photos it would be hard to discern many differences between Sand Valley and Mammoth Dunes, but playing them becomes two very different experiences.  At Sand Valley the fairways seem a bit tighter, and the areas surround the greens generally funnel balls away from the green.  To me, this meant it played substantially tougher.  I also felt like there were more uphill walks, especially on the front 9, including several climbs to get from a green to the next tee.  Of course, that type of design tends to result in downhill tee shots, as was the case for almost every hole here.  A notable exception was Hole 7 (Dan’s favorite), which required a blind uphill drive to a “fade” fairway with sand on both sides beyond a certain distance.  Highlights for me were #1, with birdies both days, and #17 with two pars (driver on day 1, 3-wood on day 2).  Lowlights were some kind of high number on #2 (first day) after playing back and forth across the raised green a few times. All in all, I think I prefer Mammoth Dunes, but I’m glad we played Sand Valley twice. If I lived and played here regularly, I’d probably play Mammoth 6 times out of 10.  If I get back there, I’ll almost certainly play shorter tees than I did.    Lawsonia Links. 8.5 We went from modern courses designed by well-respected current designers to a 90-year old course, designed by well-respected designers of their time.  I really enjoyed the look of this course, its a style from a bygone era.  For the most part the course appears to follow the original terrain.  But the designers dug relatively linear bunkers and/or hollows, piling the excavated material to form linear mounds.  And they moved a lot of earth for at least a few of the greens, creating very steep drop-offs.  In many cases, the bunkers and mounds were well short of the greens, requiring a shot to carry the bunker or hollow, but not requiring the ball to carry all the way to the green.  This also confuses the depth perception at times, “just over the bunker” wasn’t anywhere close to being on the green.  Conditions were very good, the greens had plenty of contour, but never seemed to leave an “impossible to get close” putt.  Unlike the very tight turf at the Sand Valley courses, the turf here was a little more lush, so perfect contact on short game shots was a little less critical.  And there was rough, and beyond that some tall fescue, as opposed to the native sand at the previous courses.   The clubhouse and range and other facilities were pretty modest, but the staff were friendly and efficient.  Our foursome enjoyed the first few holes so well we decided that a second 18 was a great idea.  This is also where I had my best round, 76.  As much as I try to evaluate courses based on their merits, the quality of my play is bound to be at least a subconscious factor. Lac La Belle 7 This is a very recent rebuild on the site of a previous course.  From what I’ve read, there’s very little remaining from the old course, its been almost entirely redesigned.  Conditions were excellent, and the course is very pretty.  Its pretty demanding in places, with woods or creeks or bunkers on both sides of the fairway, and mostly slightly to significantly elevated greens.  Greens varied, some relatively small, others were huge and heavily contoured.  I thought in that on a few of the greens the slopes were too severe for the speed of the greens, but that was only a few.  The facilities were excellent, a good driving range, nice new clubhouse.  But the course just doesn’t stand out to me, its a good modern golf course.  And there are just a few goofy greens, 60 yards or more deep, really severe contours, its as if they’re done that way to inspire conversation, not to actually play. All in all, we played some really good golf courses, each and every one.  Of the 5 full-size courses, the ones I’d like to play most are Mammoth Dunes and Lawsonia Links. 
    • To me this is fairly simple geometry.  If you're set up right, your hips will turn around an inclined axis.  Imagine a hula hoop around your waist, tilted a little.  That means that in the backswing, your lead hip will move "around" that axis, away from the target, closer to the ball, and closer to the ground.  The trail hip does the opposite.  So your lead leg has to increase flex, your trail leg has to extend.  The opposite happens in the forward swing.   As to what feel will produce the most efficient movements, that's going to vary from person to person.  
    • Any guys here know the courses up near Albany/Saratoga Springs area ? Driving up from Northern NJ and doing a three day up to the race course in Saratoga Springs and would like to place a course close to the NY thruway going up and coming back. We already have a tee time at Saratoga National so looking for one or two more nice tracks. 
    • A better way to say it would be using the leg to push the hip, here's a video of what I mean he's referring to the downswing but am I right in saying for the backswing should you do something similar, where you use your leg to push the hip rather than just trying to get the hip to turn clockwise   
  • Today's Birthdays

    1. camerongautx
      camerongautx
      (30 years old)
    2. CyboNinja
      CyboNinja
      (40 years old)
    3. Hawk367
      Hawk367
      (54 years old)

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...