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How Much Does The Tightness Level of your Grip Influence Club Position at Impact and Swing Path?

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9 minutes ago, golfindude1 said:

golf is a sport that requires attention to the littlest of details.

And...paying attention to the littlest of details can wreck one’s swing something awful.🙂

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I've been over this article before, and I was happy to do it again. Nothing in the article mentions grip, and when it comes to ball flight "laws", or more correctly "impact", grip means nothing at all. More specific to the 7 impact criteria (ground contact, face contact, clubface direction, club speed, swing path, angle of attack, and dynamic loft), none of them have to do with how much pressure your fingers/hands put on the club.

I am assuming that you think that your grip is too tight (most golfers do). Read this and change your own mind.

If the club isn't flying out of your hands and your knuckles aren't white, you are probably in the good zone.

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3 minutes ago, Vinsk said:

And...paying attention to the littlest of details can wreck one’s swing something awful.🙂

What I mean by "paying attention to the littlest of details" comes from the "5 S's of Great Practice" article. Based of of that, I wanted to focus on shortening my swing and making sure that reaching the A4 doesn't look whippy. To aid that new swing, I came up with a technique to ensure that I get a feel of the A3 which is the perfect time for me to cup my wrists to the maximum ability. So far, I feel like I've done a good job. I'm just looking for new things to work on once I'm confident in my new swing.

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15 minutes ago, Bonvivant said:

I've been over this article before, and I was happy to do it again. Nothing in the article mentions grip, and when it comes to ball flight "laws", or more correctly "impact", grip means nothing at all. More specific to the 7 impact criteria (ground contact, face contact, clubface direction, club speed, swing path, angle of attack, and dynamic loft), none of them have to do with how much pressure your fingers/hands put on the club.

I am assuming that you think that your grip is too tight (most golfers do). Read this and change your own mind.

If the club isn't flying out of your hands and your knuckles aren't white, you are probably in the good zone.

I've read this article before and had decided to make my grip more firm next time I'm swinging the club.

The reason I ask is if the level of tightness influences how much twist one will apply to the clubface. Through the past few rounds the direction of where I hit the ball is inconsistent. Well, I guess, it must me something that's not grip then.

Thank you for clearing things up though.

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Something I noticed regarding grip regardless of how I grip the club at address... with standard size grips I tend to regrip the club and close the club face during my swing. With midsize grips I do not.

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