Jump to content
barnum1

What if I Play a Ball for Slower Swing Speed?

16 posts / 1280 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

Hi! 

I've read a lot about why you shouldn't play a ball that requires a swing speed higher than you have. 

But what if I played a ball designed for slower swing speeds? I have a driver swing speed of 95 mph, and if I were to play for example Callaway Supersoft (designed for under 90 mph I believe), what would I lose? Distance? Accuracy? 

Where I live, I can buy a dozen Callaway Supersoft $10 less than Callaway SR2 (that I usually play). Not to mention Callaway Chrome Soft which is even more expensive. 

Thanks for input! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, barnum1 said:

Hi! 

I've read a lot about why you shouldn't play a ball that requires a swing speed higher than you have. 

But what if I played a ball designed for slower swing speeds? I have a driver swing speed of 95 mph, and if I were to play for example Callaway Supersoft (designed for under 90 mph I believe), what would I lose? Distance? Accuracy? 

Where I live, I can buy a dozen Callaway Supersoft $10 less than Callaway SR2 (that I usually play). Not to mention Callaway Chrome Soft which is even more expensive. 

Thanks for input! 

I would recommend trying them. It really is up to you to find a ball you are comfortable with. I’ve not noticed much performance difference in balls except for maybe Pinnacles, which feel rock hard to me. I’m not sure if I believe in the ‘swing speed’ marketing approach. They don’t really show much data to support it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

The idea that certain balls are better or made for slow swing speeds haven't really held up under testing from what i've read.  Its more marketing myth than anything in an attempt to make market segmentation easier (or at least thats my opinion).

Check out this article from MyGolfSpy.  Particularly points 3 and 4 in the introduction.  Then take a look at the data for balls at 85 mph swing speeds.

Generally speaking, golf balls marketed to slower swing speed golfers are lower compression balls.  And lower compression balls are generally slower in ball speed, resulting in less distance.  And if you play balls that don't have a soft urethane cover, you will lose spin around the greens.  So a ball like Callaway Supersoft, you will lose distance off the tee and spin around the green versus something like a Pro V1x.  In fact, that article recommends the Pro V1x as the best ball for distance for slower swing speeds, which runs contrary to almost everything you see related to marketing for the Pro V1x.

It looks like price is a consideration to you and how much that difference in performance is worth to you is entirely up to you.  There are some great balls comparable in price to the Supersoft (or a little more expensive) that should give better performance at any swing speed, such as the Maxfli Tour or Snell MTB or Kirkland balls.

 

topballs_v2.jpg

This is the most impactful test we have ever published. Over the past 10 years, MyGolfSpy has conducted hundreds of tests, and published thousands of articles that have influenced millions[...]

 

Edited by bweiss711

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

29 minutes ago, bweiss711 said:

The idea that certain balls are better or made for slow swing speeds haven't really held up under testing from what i've read.  Its more marketing myth than anything in an attempt to make market segmentation easier (or at least thats my opinion).

Check out this article from MyGolfSpy.  Particularly points 3 and 4 in the introduction.  Then take a look at the data for balls at 85 mph swing speeds.

Generally speaking, golf balls marketed to slower swing speed golfers are lower compression balls.  And lower compression balls are generally slower in ball speed, resulting in less distance.  And if you play balls that don't have a soft urethane cover, you will lose spin around the greens.  So a ball like Callaway Supersoft, you will lose distance off the tee and spin around the green versus something like a Pro V1x.  In fact, that article recommends the Pro V1x as the best ball for distance for slower swing speeds, which runs contrary to almost everything you see related to marketing for the Pro V1x.

It looks like price is a consideration to you and how much that difference in performance is worth to you is entirely up to you.  There are some great balls comparable in price to the Supersoft (or a little more expensive) that should give better performance at any swing speed, such as the Maxfli Tour or Snell MTB or Kirkland balls.

 

topballs_v2.jpg

This is the most impactful test we have ever published. Over the past 10 years, MyGolfSpy has conducted hundreds of tests, and published thousands of articles that have influenced millions[...]

 

Good stuff. I hadn't seen this. Time for me to go to lostgolfballs and buy a massive bucket of something better than the Srixon Soft Feel I've been playing. Not really sure why I went for them in particular. They have 120 mint graded K Sigs for $90...might jump on that.

Edited by Grizvok

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

7 minutes ago, Grizvok said:

Good stuff. I hadn't seen this. Time for me to go to lostgolfballs and buy a massive bucket of something better than the Srixon Soft Feel I've been playing. Not really sure why I went for them in particular. They have 120 mint graded K Sigs for $90...might jump on that.

I'd be curious what you think if you go for it.  Prior to this year, and doing that kind of research, I'd played Titleist Velocity that I could find used for about 50 cents a ball.  This year, after doing the research, particularly on the benefits of the urethane cover, i tried the Pro V1x.  Still used, but quite a step up to about $1.65 a ball for prior year's model.  The difference around the green is crazy. Pitch shots from 50 - 100 yards in stop on a dime, and chipping around the green with high lofted clubs gets almost no roll.  I still remember my first round of the year with the new ball, and i had a chip from just a few feet off the green with a 54 degree wedge, and it checked up and stopped after just a few feet of roll.  My buddy and I looked at each other both with that WTF look.  I don't really notice too much difference off the tee, putting, or on longer approach shots.  But there is just so much more control around the green, and don't think ill be going back to Velocity any time soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

1 minute ago, bweiss711 said:

I'd be curious what you think if you go for it.  Prior to this year, and doing that kind of research, I'd played Titleist Velocity that I could find used for about 50 cents a ball.  This year, after doing the research, particularly on the benefits of the urethane cover, i tried the Pro V1x.  Still used, but quite a step up to about $1.65 a ball for prior year's model.  The difference around the green is crazy. Pitch shots from 50 - 100 yards in stop on a dime, and chipping around the green with high lofted clubs gets almost no roll.  I still remember my first round of the year with the new ball, and i had a chip from just a few feet off the green with a 54 degree wedge, and it checked up and stopped after just a few feet of roll.  My buddy and I looked at each other both with that WTF look.  I don't really notice too much difference off the tee, putting, or on longer approach shots.  But there is just so much more control around the green, and don't think ill be going back to Velocity any time soon.

Honestly, I lose don't lose too many balls nowadays, and the last few rounds have been played with a small'ish collection of Pro V1's I've found on the course. I do notice a significant difference with those balls versus the Soft Feel, and you are absolutely right; it comes down to how the ball reacts on the green from shorter approaches and short game shots. I'm going to need them on Friday as I'm playing a 7000 yard course with glass-like greens that has been used on the Web.com and Senior PGA Tour.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Nothing better than to try it yourself!

So I played 12 holes on a local shortish course with two balls: Callaway Supersoft and Callaway SR2 (the one I usually play).
To be honest, I could not see a definite difference in distance. 
What I did see somewhat systematically was that Supersoft was straighter, especially from tee. 
The only advantage I could find with SR2 was that I got more backspin. I had a few wedges spinning back towards me, but none with Supersoft.

This was of course not a scientifical experiment, and not that many shots. So take it for what it's worth...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've played both low and higher compression balls. Low compression balls Wilson Duo Soft, Callaway Supersoft, Maxfli Softfli. Higher compression balls TP5x, ProV1x, MTBx, Cut Blue, Vice Pro Plus.

I didn't really notice any significant performance difference, however I like the feel of the Snell MTBx balls the most, so that's what I play most often now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I play all different makes of balls from top flights to Pro v1s, (when I find them). I never noticed a difference in carry, except I tried the KIrkland 3 piece ball I bought at Costco. I definitely lost carry yardage, like 10 yards maybe. I looked up a  review of the ball and they said it was not for a person like myself who has a slower swing speed, compression ratio is to high, They recommended a compression ratio between 55 and 75, (whatever that means), I never see compression ratio listed on the box so how is one to know?

Anyone else find a make of ball that causes a loss of yardage?

I'm 69 years old, have had three back surgeries, swing speed around 90 mph with a driver.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a slow swinger. I like the feel of SuperSoft and generally get good distance. The ProVIx also. Go figure. Best, -Marv

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I have a relatively slow swing swing speed - never been on a machine but based on my "average" yardage carry its in the low 80's.  What does that mean in terms of which ball I use - I hit them all about the same distance.  Now some sound better coming off the head than others. Some really check up better than others.  What do I play these days?  A very cheap 2-piece Wilson ball that you buy by the bag at Wally World.  By cheap, I mean really cheap.  These were on close-out at $1 for a two dozen bag!  The ball hits well, stops pretty good and for some reason I cannot lose one. Have played the last two rounds with the same ball!   And if I do lose one, so what it is a $.04 ball not a $4.00 ball!  

Edited by WillieT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

On 8/11/2020 at 2:08 PM, barnum1 said:

Hi! 

I've read a lot about why you shouldn't play a ball that requires a swing speed higher than you have. 

But what if I played a ball designed for slower swing speeds? I have a driver swing speed of 95 mph, and if I were to play for example Callaway Supersoft (designed for under 90 mph I believe), what would I lose? Distance? Accuracy? 

Where I live, I can buy a dozen Callaway Supersoft $10 less than Callaway SR2 (that I usually play). Not to mention Callaway Chrome Soft which is even more expensive. 

Thanks for input! 

FWIW, I haven’t bought the golf ball in a store in over 2 years.

Amazon is your friend!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I do not like the way the very low compression balls feel when I chip or putt.  They seem to jump off the face of the club.  I am sure I could get accustom to it...but I would rather not.  It works better, for me, if I have to put something behind it in order for the ball to behave.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

I can score my normal numbers with urethane and/or a distance/cheaper (non urethane) brand ball. My choice is purely on feel with wedges and putting. I wish had a scratch game and the need to zero in on one type / brand of golf ball but I just get in a mood and buy one brand/model that feels good with my putter of the day. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 8/11/2020 at 2:08 PM, barnum1 said:

Hi! 

I've read a lot about why you shouldn't play a ball that requires a swing speed higher than you have. 

But what if I played a ball designed for slower swing speeds? I have a driver swing speed of 95 mph, and if I were to play for example Callaway Supersoft (designed for under 90 mph I believe), what would I lose? Distance? Accuracy? 

Where I live, I can buy a dozen Callaway Supersoft $10 less than Callaway SR2 (that I usually play). Not to mention Callaway Chrome Soft which is even more expensive. 

Thanks for input! 

There is no such thing as a ball for slower swing speeds.  There are merely premium balls, balls somewhere in the middle, and bargain balls.  There are varying degrees of spin and feel with each.  Play the best ball that you're willing and able to pay for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.




×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...