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Vespidae

Best Weekly Practice Plan?

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I completely redid my practice routine based on 65/25/10 ratios. I tend to practice 100 minutes daily using this framework and it's really helped provide structure to my practice. My short game has improved dramatically.

Question?

Is it better to practice all areas of the game (putting, short game, full swing) each day ... or ... break it up into alternating days? For example, Monday/Thursday: Short Game, Tue/Fri: Putting; Wednesday/Saturday: Full swing. (I'm also thinking of playing 9 holes a day on a par 3 course attached to the range.)

Any thoughts?  

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5 minutes ago, Vespidae said:

I completely redid my practice routine based on 65/25/10 ratios. I tend to practice 100 minutes daily using this framework and it's really helped provide structure to my practice. My short game has improved dramatically.

Question?

Is it better to practice all areas of the game (putting, short game, full swing) each day ... or ... break it up into alternating days? For example, Monday/Thursday: Short Game, Tue/Fri: Putting; Wednesday/Saturday: Full swing. (I'm also thinking of playing 9 holes a day on a par 3 course attached to the range.)

Any thoughts?  

To me, working on any one part of the game for an hour and a half would be too much.  I'm pretty sure I'd lose concentration, and to be productive, you really do need to be concentrating on something specific all of the time.  For that reason alone I'd recommend splitting each session into several segments for different skills.  The time spent in each segment can and should vary depending on the level of your game in each of the skills.  The 65/25/10 recommendation is absolutely appropriate if your game is similar across all facets, but if your putting is the poorest part of your game (for instance), you should allocate more time to putting drills.  You might only need to practice your putting for 20 minutes in a week, and dedicate the more time to some other facet of the game that needs improvement.  

You might also look at your sample schedule, your ratios in that are 33/33/33.  Even if you do decide to dedicate entire days to a single facet of the game, putting might need one day, fulls swings 3 days.

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47 minutes ago, DaveP043 said:

To me, working on any one part of the game for an hour and a half would be too much.  I'm pretty sure I'd lose concentration, and to be productive, you really do need to be concentrating on something specific all of the time.  For that reason alone I'd recommend splitting each session into several segments for different skills.  The time spent in each segment can and should vary depending on the level of your game in each of the skills.  The 65/25/10 recommendation is absolutely appropriate if your game is similar across all facets, but if your putting is the poorest part of your game (for instance), you should allocate more time to putting drills.  You might only need to practice your putting for 20 minutes in a week, and dedicate the more time to some other facet of the game that needs improvement.  

You might also look at your sample schedule, your ratios in that are 33/33/33.  Even if you do decide to dedicate entire days to a single facet of the game, putting might need one day, fulls swings 3 days.

Pretty much echoing everything @DaveP043 said.

I'm really trying to hone in my full swing so that's where I spend 95% of my time on which is probably too much anyway, but I typically get a small bucket and record myself and from the time I get out of the car to the time I get back into the car is about an hour.

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I put in an hour (+/-) of practice (most) every day that I am not playing. It usually involves more than one aspect of my game. I very seldom spend the whole hour (+/-) on just one aspect of my game. 

Some days it will be d-range work with my longer clubs, hitting various shots, from different lies if possible. I use my own diy fairway to land balls in. 

Other days it will be short game stuff, like flops, pitches, chips, and putts. Sometimes I will combine putting with the other three shots for a practice score. Some days I might use both the d-range, and the short game areas. 

For a change, I will hit balls from trouble spots. Spots like uneven lies, bunkers, 2nd cut rough, unmowed rough, over trees, from under trees, bare/thin lies. Anything I can think of, that I might encounter when playing. 

I don't spend any particular amount of percentage time on any one aspect of my game. Just what ever I think I need, or want to work on that day.  

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I think you have to practice on what you need work on. Everybody’s game is different. Some guys don’t need to practice at all. I recently bought my first 60* wedge and haven’t gotten used to it yet so I spend a greater percentage of my practice time with that club. I’m hitting my driver pretty well so I’ll spend less time with that club. I just try to keep my practice fun and productive.

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I find that practice routine can be more dictated by availability. Sometimes range is closed on a certain day. Rain. Course/range not available because there's an event. If you go full bore you will burn out. There's a happy medium, different for every person, where you get in as much as you can without it feeling like work. And don't discount practice at home with a mirror or Mirror Vision.

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I probably practice maybe an hour a week and the routine changes depending on the part of the season we're in. Early in the golf season it's probably  80% full swing, 20% short game & putting. (I HATE practicing putting, It's boring and as a result I'm a crummy putter early in the season.) As the season progresses and my swing gets more dialed in, it flip-flops 180° and I concentrate much more on the short game (100 yds. in) because that's where strokes and a round can really be saved.

My summer routine is go to the range on Saturday, hit a small bucket (45 minutes) + some chipping, pitches, sand,  play Monday for fun (walk), Wednesday with my league (ride) and the rest of the week just do other non-golf things.

I would NEVER consider practicing 100 minutes/day. If I practiced that much I would grow to hate the game.

 

Edited by xrayvizhen

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