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Lost Swing Phenomena


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Lost Swing phenomena.

In preparation for 18 holes yesterday, I hit the gym in the morning with a light 30 min workout (not something I normally do-I usually don't workout right before golf)  and then headed to a range near my house where I struck the ball well and shaped it (fade, cut, draw) according to my setup and intentions. All was well. I then drove to the course about an hour away. I say this because, perhaps, the time between the warm-up and starting the round, my body got tense.

Arriving at the course, I hit the practice green, and did well to start the ball on line--no issues CHECK. On the range though, I kept shanking the ball with my irons even when my setup and swing felt like my normal cut/straight shot. I checked my alignment with sticks, but it was fine. It was the strangest thing. The swing felt right but shank, shank, shank over and over  Driving was fine. At any rate, the round started, and after a few holes of not striking the ball well with my irons, I resorted to a setup that would play a fade.

The rest of the round went much better.  So my question is, what in the world happened to my swing?  I was fine at the range just 2 hours before and then suddenly I "lost it". 

(it would nice to a caddy/friend with me at the course to make quick corrections)

Edited by greatgolfahead
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Well, aside from the ol' hit it great on the range, terrible on the course dichotomy,  I can tell you this:  Sometimes I'll hit the range and then head home and decide to go back and play golf a little later.  Sometimes I'll hit the range and then decide to travel and play a different course.  Sometimes I'll hit the range and then have to wait for the frost delay to end.  Never works out. I think it's that "cool down" period.

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2 hours ago, greatgolfahead said:

The rest of the round went much better.  So my question is, what in the world happened to my swing?  I was fine at the range just 2 hours before and then suddenly I "lost it". 

Keep a tripod on hand and record your swing at the range the next time you get the shanks. Then record your swing when you are doing well. 

Most likely it's a path issue. Either way the path is getting sent out towards the ball so much that you are hitting the hosel. It could be you already heel the ball a bit, and then the change in swing path wouldn't need to be that much to cause a shank. 

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4 minutes ago, saevel25 said:

Keep a tripod on hand and record your swing at the range the next time you get the shanks. Then record your swing when you are doing well. 

Most likely it's a path issue. Either way the path is getting sent out towards the ball so much that you are hitting the hosel. It could be you already heel the ball a bit, and then the change in swing path wouldn't need to be that much to cause a shank. 

It's also real handy to record those shanks you hit while on the course, at least in my own experience, I've learned a lot from seeing my course shank swings on video and have been able to correct in the same round.

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18 hours ago, nevets88 said:

It's also real handy to record those shanks you hit while on the course, at least in my own experience, I've learned a lot from seeing my course shank swings on video and have been able to correct in the same round.

That's a fantastic idea. I already have a smartphone mount on my tripod so that I don't have to carry a camcorder to the course.  I figure i can just say out loud the outcome of the shot and review the footage.  I think this is also going to help me incredibly with seeing what I'm doing compared to what I think/feel that I'm doing in the swing.

19 hours ago, Double Mocha Man said:

Well, aside from the ol' hit it great on the range, terrible on the course dichotomy,  I can tell you this:  Sometimes I'll hit the range and then head home and decide to go back and play golf a little later.  Sometimes I'll hit the range and then decide to travel and play a different course.  Sometimes I'll hit the range and then have to wait for the frost delay to end.  Never works out. I think it's that "cool down" period.

I agree. I'm going to google more on this concept of "cool down".  It was so strange. My mind was like, "let's do it", while my body was doing something different. Six months ago, I would been rather upset to make such horrendous mistakes before a round, but I've gotten control of my ego through mentality shifts-mainly, it's about recognizing that golf is difficult and that the game is about mistakes according to Tiger Woods.

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  • 2 weeks later...

In golf - I have noticed that too much of a good thing is often punished. Cruelly at times. So for instance, you were swinging feeling loose and great with some nice easy movement - and subconsciously you take that enthusiasm out on the course and things go haywire as soon as you get to the uneven lies and shoddy tee boxes that you are now  presented with. Maybe you added a little more gas to a swing and that was the cause of the miss. So you instantly correct - and try and do more of what you perceived was originally correct - and inadvertently misdiagnose what could be a minor sway, setup or grip issue - or just a fluke. Another miss. Then it is in your head and you are toast. I think this happens to most golfers at some point and the best remedy is having a routine for every shot that you can fall back on as well as some stock shots that you can always rely on - even if they are things like "feet together drill" or 3/4 swings. I know for me it is always a grip issue that creeps in - I love the feel of a weak grip and I have to check it every single time I hold a club to make it slightly strong in order to hit what I want to hit. So everyone has their issues and golf punishes you when you start feeling too good about something. Build a rock solid routine to foolproof your setup and swing. 

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3 minutes ago, DavidM said:

In golf - I have noticed that too much of a good thing is often punished. Cruelly at times. So for instance, you were swinging feeling loose and great with some nice easy movement - and subconsciously you take that enthusiasm out on the course and things go haywire as soon as you get to the uneven lies and shoddy tee boxes that you are now  presented with. Maybe you added a little more gas to a swing and that was the cause of the miss. So you instantly correct - and try and do more of what you perceived was originally correct - and inadvertently misdiagnose what could be a minor sway, setup or grip issue - or just a fluke. Another miss. Then it is in your head and you are toast. I think this happens to most golfers at some point and the best remedy is having a routine for every shot that you can fall back on as well as some stock shots that you can always rely on - even if they are things like "feet together drill" or 3/4 swings. I know for me it is always a grip issue that creeps in - I love the feel of a weak grip and I have to check it every single time I hold a club to make it slightly strong in order to hit what I want to hit. So everyone has their issues and golf punishes you when you start feeling too good about something. Build a rock solid routine to foolproof your setup and swing. 

Touche, this game will present surprises and mistakes. It's inevitable. Through practice and coaching I have developed a routine, and on days I'm hitting it straight or cutting it, I do have other options to shape the ball. The more tools (skills) you have at your disposable, the more adaptable you can be to the conditions.    

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The dreaded shanks are contagious. If you hit one on the range fine, but two in a row and just walk away and go putt and come back after a few minutes and remember to breathe. Once you do come back, work on your path with a headcover just outside the ball and start with some easy shots then progress to full shots. Question for you, do you tend to whip the club inside on the takeaway or slide forward a bit? And remember: 

Everybody shanks, sometimes.....

 

Edited by TourSpoon
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(edited)
1 hour ago, TourSpoon said:

The dreaded shanks are contagious. If you hit one on the range fine, but two in a row and just walk away and go putt and come back after a few minutes and remember to breathe. Once you do come back, work on your path with a headcover just outside the ball and start with some easy shots then progress to full shots. Question for you, do you tend to whip the club inside on the takeaway or slide forward a bit? And remember: 

Everybody shanks, sometimes.....

 

Since that day of shanking the ball one after another, I have modified my ball position to be half a club face further away from me. This feels better.  If the shanks come back, I can always switch to a draw or cut setup.  I like to have options.

Edited by iacas
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