Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
x-forged

speed of augusta greens.

Note: This thread is 4439 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

18 posts / 9011 viewsLast Reply

Recommended Posts

I always wondered how putting on carpet compared to an actual course stimp rating.

I was flipping through the latest golf magazine and came across a stimpmeter test. Augusta has an estimated stimp rating of 14, with the 16th hole having a rating of an estimated 18. According to this stimp rating, Augusta's greens compare to tight-weave office carpet. The 16th at augusta compares to an asphalt driveway. Give it a shot. I put this in swing tips to see if other people practice putting at home on capret, hardwood, etc. and if it has helped them on the course.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I practice putting at home, I just work on my stroke and grip.
If I putted on my carpet, I'd be the worst putter around.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i know oakmonts greens are very very difficult...i think it was johnny miller that said he used to putt on a linoleum floor and compare it to oakmonts greens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

basically they starve the greens of water the week of the tourney, and color them, (probably with iron) to keep them looking pretty.

That's why the players usually go lights out after it rains.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

basically they starve the greens of water the week of the tourney, and color them, (probably with iron) to keep them looking pretty.

Huh? Why are they coloring it with iron? C'mon, Augusta doesn't paint their greens...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Huh? Why are they coloring it with iron? C'mon, Augusta doesn't paint their greens...

Iron is not used as a paint, if that's what you were referring to. It has nutritional value which provides a "natural" green up. As to exact reasoning behind how the Augusta national greens get so fast, I would suspect it's a combination of multiple mowings/day, heavy rolling, liquid fertilizers/growth regulators, and scarce water applications. Typical for what any course does to increase speeds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and lets see if the greenstaff can get the roots of the green running towards the water- then there'll be some fun..lol.

On the stint, theyre usually about 6+ for this event...but they will have to look at the weather forecast beforehand to make sure that they protect the greens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Huh? Why are they coloring it with iron? C'mon, Augusta doesn't paint their greens...

Because they would be brown from lack of water. That is how they make them so fast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and lets see if the greenstaff can get the roots of the green running towards the water- then there'll be some fun..lol.

Stimp, 6+?

Try 13+

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and lets see if the greenstaff can get the roots of the green running towards the water- then there'll be some fun..lol.

It's bent grass. There's no grain, if that's what you're getting at.

On the stint, theyre usually about 6+ for this event...but they will have to look at the weather forecast beforehand to make sure that they protect the greens.

6+ has already been addressed.

They don't have to look at the weather forecast. Virtually every green has the sub-air system. They can pump water into greens or suck it out. They deliver their fertilizers and other items this way as well (in addition to some top-side applications).
Because they would be brown from lack of water. That is how they make them so fast.

Iron is typically used (by even home landscapers) early in the spring (i.e. right now in the northwest, or a month or two ago in Georgia). The greens - and the rest of the course - would still be green without the iron.

MrKadash has it closest... except the "scarce water applications" bit. They constantly regulate soil dampness via the sub system. It's rare that they'd ever have to apply water top-side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

It's bent grass. There's no grain, if that's what you're getting at.

Interesting... I had a friend who did maintenance for them in the early 90's during the tourney. It is likely that my information is simply outdated. He did say they used to absolutely starve the greens, then color them. Iron was simply a guess, could have been something else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a friend who did maintenance for them in the early 90's during the tourney. It is likely that my information is simply outdated. He did say they used to absolutely starve the greens, then color them. Iron was simply a guess, could have been something else.

Well, he was there before they had the systems beneath so many of the greens... so it's quite likely their practices have changed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Awards, Achievements, and Accolades

Iron is typically used (by even home landscapers) early in the spring (i.e. right now in the northwest, or a month or two ago in Georgia). The greens - and the rest of the course - would still be green without the iron.

Iron is actually an integral part of many superintendents nutritional programs. I have used it for years throughout the growing season in combination with other fertilizers and sometimes as a stand alone on every green, tee, and fairway on my course.

As far as Augusta National, they have a state of the art irrigation system that applies water above ground that is necessitated by the 90-100 degree temperatures during the months they are closed. The cooling of the turf canopy is absolutely imperative to keep it alive, especially bentgrass, which does not enjoy the high temperatures like bermuda. I can't comment on the subsystem, but can say with certainty that wet roots doesn't mean a wet canopy or leaf blade, which will fry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Iron is a quick green. Doesnt last very long. The greens are double cut at 1/10" with super thin bedknives, and rolled. You'd be suprised at what the filters on the cameras do. Im not sure what variety of bent is on the greens, it sure as hell isnt pencross. I believe everything else is overseeded rye. I've heard the monitor they ground temps around the azaleas so they bloom at the right time. With an unlimited budget, you can do anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Note: This thread is 4439 days old. We appreciate that you found this thread instead of starting a new one, but if you plan to post here please make sure it's still relevant. If not, please start a new topic. Thank you!

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to TST! Signing up is free, and you'll see fewer ads and can talk with fellow golf enthusiasts! By using TST, you agree to our Terms of Use, our Privacy Policy, and our Guidelines.

The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...